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Sterling - Trash Currency

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Serious doubts about sterling again.

Trash government, backed up by trash Bankrupt of England with security of the most overworked and underhoused population in the western world (those that can get a job or mortgage themselves up enough to join the insane).

Other central banks puling back from the brink, our bunch of clowns want to drive right over the edge of the cliff.

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I think it was the YE OLD word for Silver!

Mike

£1 Sterling i presume was worth/exchangable for 1 pound of silver at some point in time.

Currently a pound of sliver costs £142.

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If youre so convinced the pound sterling is worth-less then tell up how many dollars or Euros you hold.

Risk is everywhere and its clear to me at least the USA plans on devaluing the dollar to reprice its debts.

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£1 Sterling i presume was worth/exchangable for 1 pound of silver at some point in time.

Currently a pound of sliver costs £142.

Although it's an international reserve currency a sterling pound is not even worth a pound of sausage never mind a pound of silver! :lol:

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If youre so convinced the pound sterling is worth-less then tell up how many dollars or Euros you hold.

Risk is everywhere and its clear to me at least the USA plans on devaluing the dollar to reprice its debts.

Yes the risk is everywhere - dollars, euros, pounds: they're all free-floating and subject to dilution through QE. Who knows what currency you should hold?

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If youre so convinced the pound sterling is worth-less then tell up how many dollars or Euros you hold.

Risk is everywhere and its clear to me at least the USA plans on devaluing the dollar to reprice its debts.

Bit like comparing rotten apples to rotten pears. I still think the stench from this one will be the worst, alas not in a position to fully protect savings either way, c'est la vie.

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Yes the risk is everywhere - dollars, euros, pounds: they're all free-floating and subject to dilution through QE. Who knows what currency you should hold?

Experiment with attempting to pay for your groceries with any token other than £ for a lesson in which currency to hold.

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Yes the risk is everywhere - dollars, euros, pounds: they're all free-floating and subject to dilution through QE. Who knows what currency you should hold?

precisely.

it's a bit of paper.

the real currencies are,and have always been,land and food.

gold is a universally recognised means of exchange,which transcends fiat.

but the means to sustainance are far more valuable than gold.

it's basic needs.Food,water,fuel and shelter.

create a scarcity in any of these and watch people squeal....the PTB are full aware of this,and it can be weaponised.

the problem occurs for these landowners,that people will get so hungry they,quite frankly,won't give a shit what's been put on the statute book to protect the "haves".

it'll be a total free-for-all.....and those who posess the most will end up losing the most.

Edited by oracle

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£1 Sterling i presume was worth/exchangable for 1 pound of silver at some point in time.

Currently a pound of sliver costs £142.

http://dollardaze.org/blog/?post_id=00405

The British Pound originally represented one troy pound of sterling silver back in 1560. Sterling silver is 92.5% pure silver and there are 12 troy ounces in a troy pound. Elizabeth I and her advisor Sir Thomas Gresham (of Gresham's Law fame) established the new currency to bring about order created by the "Great Debasement" of 1543-51 when Henry VIII sought to finance his costly wars with both France and Scotland.

Paper banknotes were issued shortly after the establishment of the Bank of England in 1694.

As of January 7, 2009 it now takes 81.8 GBP to purchase that same troy pound of sterling silver - a loss of 98.8%!

central bankers fighting the war against inflation :lol:

British_Pound.jpg

post-2696-1251225453_thumb.jpg

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Experiment with attempting to pay for your groceries with any token other than £ for a lesson in which currency to hold.

i say we pool some funds and manufacture our own tokens

injins perhaps

http://www.press.umich.edu/titleDetailDesc.do?id=307069

Good Money tells the fascinating story of British manufacturers' challenge to the Crown's monopoly on coinage. In the 1780s, when the Industrial Revolution was gathering momentum, the Royal Mint failed to produce enough small-denomination coinage for factory owners to pay their workers. As the currency shortage threatened to derail industrial progress, manufacturers began to mint custom-made coins, called "tradesman's tokens." Rapidly gaining wide acceptance, these tokens served as the nation's most popular currency for wages and retail sales until 1821, when the Crown outlawed all moneys except its own.

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Guest UK Debt Slave
Why is is still allowed to be called Sterling. surely this is misinformative?

I pointed this out on HPC before

But apparently, Sterling doesn't derive its name from silver (surprisingly)

If it did, there would be a very strong case for misrepresentation and fraud.......which of course, there is anyway, but that's a different arguement altogether

Edited by UK Debt Slave

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Guest UK Debt Slave
I pointed this out on HPC before

But apparently, Sterling doesn't derive its name from silver (surprisingly)

If it did, there would be a very strong case for misrepresentation and fraud.......which of course, there is anyway, but that's a different arguement altogether

Hmmm!

But everywhere I look says Sterling does derive its name from the value of silver

Anyone out there like to put this straight?

If Sterling derives its name from the value of silver, then surely the government and the bank of England is guilty of misrepresentation and fraud

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i say we pool some funds and manufacture our own tokens

injins perhaps

http://www.press.umich.edu/titleDetailDesc.do?id=307069

No need to pool funds for the manufacture of 'our own' tokens...Monopoly money would suffice, agreeing on the face value is a horse of a different colour tho'.

Injin Dollars?..a tad volatile methinks.

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No need to pool funds for the manufacture of 'our own' tokens...Monopoly money would suffice, agreeing on the face value is a horse of a different colour tho'.

Injin Dollars?..a tad volatile methinks.

Likely to vanish in a puff of imagination.

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Hmmm!

But everywhere I look says Sterling does derive its name from the value of silver

Anyone out there like to put this straight?

If Sterling derives its name from the value of silver, then surely the government and the bank of England is guilty of misrepresentation and fraud

they have stolen at least £150bn so far this year

what do they care

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Hmmm!

But everywhere I look says Sterling does derive its name from the value of silver

Anyone out there like to put this straight?

If Sterling derives its name from the value of silver, then surely the government and the bank of England is guilty of misrepresentation and fraud

Well, it illustrates just how incredibly clever they are at perpetuating an illusion.

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No need to pool funds for the manufacture of 'our own' tokens...Monopoly money would suffice, agreeing on the face value is a horse of a different colour tho'.

Injin Dollars?..a tad volatile methinks.

valued as per the relevant material

copper

bronze

silver

gold

etc

no face value

their value changes in the free market (or as free a market as possible)

Edited by lowrentyieldmakessense(honest!)

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Hmmm!

But everywhere I look says Sterling does derive its name from the value of silver

Anyone out there like to put this straight?

If Sterling derives its name from the value of silver, then surely the government and the bank of England is guilty of misrepresentation and fraud

All our currency notes still have a signed declaration on them 'I promise to pay the bearer on demand the sum of X pounds'

X pounds of what?

It can only be silver...

So can we all go to the bank of england and demand our pounds of silver in return for our notes just like its says?

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