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polionamen

Recently Made Redundant And Need To Move

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Hi,

I've been renting for a few years with the same landlord.

I split up with the partner, who's leaving soon and also been made redundant.

The rent is now slightly too high for me for the moment but I wanted some feedback on how easy/hard it is to find a new tenancy being unemployed.

I have strong references and I have an income insurance (paying 80% of last net salary for 1 year) so clearly money is not a problem yet.

Can you tell your experiences, which route is better (agents, flatshares, direct), etc.

Thanks

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Hi,

I've been renting for a few years with the same landlord.

I split up with the partner, who's leaving soon and also been made redundant.

The rent is now slightly too high for me for the moment but I wanted some feedback on how easy/hard it is to find a new tenancy being unemployed.

I have strong references and I have an income insurance (paying 80% of last net salary for 1 year) so clearly money is not a problem yet.

Can you tell your experiences, which route is better (agents, flatshares, direct), etc.

Thanks

IME Agents are a PITA in this instance.

If you don't fit exactly into their model of "employed earning X" then they don't want to know, even if you can easily pay the rent out of savings or some other way.

tim

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IME Agents are a PITA in this instance.

If you don't fit exactly into their model of "employed earning X" then they don't want to know, even if you can easily pay the rent out of savings or some other way.

tim

So lie to them. They will be eager to believe you. Think about it - they just want to get the property let and move on. If it ever gets to the point where you need to provide an employer's reference, well, that's what friends are for. If you need to show bank statements as proof of earnings, then provide a downloaded (and suitably amended) spreadsheet, and say you do not receive paper statements anymore. Get creative, and don't worry about it.

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So lie to them. They will be eager to believe you. Think about it - they just want to get the property let and move on. If it ever gets to the point where you need to provide an employer's reference, well, that's what friends are for. If you need to show bank statements as proof of earnings, then provide a downloaded (and suitably amended) spreadsheet, and say you do not receive paper statements anymore. Get creative, and don't worry about it.

Not sure about this.

When we started renting our agency had us reference and credit checked, so I don't think we could have lied, even if we wanted to.

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Not sure about this.

When we started renting our agency had us reference and credit checked, so I don't think we could have lied, even if we wanted to.

The so-called 'credit check' only consists of a search for CCJs in one's name on the properties one has been living in. They cannot access financial information (arrears, etc); letting agencies are not financial institutions and thus do not have access to that information from the credit reference companies.

Other references will be taken from the contacts that are provided by the prospective tenant ;) ( your mates down the pub).

Obviously, MacGuffin would never recommend such a duplicitous course of action; I am only saying that it would be possible.

Edited by MacGuffin

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Hi,

I've been renting for a few years with the same landlord.

I split up with the partner, who's leaving soon and also been made redundant.

The rent is now slightly too high for me for the moment but I wanted some feedback on how easy/hard it is to find a new tenancy being unemployed.

I have strong references and I have an income insurance (paying 80% of last net salary for 1 year) so clearly money is not a problem yet.

Can you tell your experiences, which route is better (agents, flatshares, direct), etc.

Thanks

Do some research about how much rental property is available in your area (e.g. Rightmove with PropertyBee to see how long local rentals have been on the market). If a glut, have a chat with the LL about this and your current situation. It doesn't take too many void months for it to make sense for your LL to reduce the rent and keep you. Surely the LL is better with someone who has preumably been a good tenant for a few years than have to advertise? Would the LL object to you finding a flatmate (assuming the place is 2 bed) to help top-up what they might be looking for?

Relationship breakdown and job loss together is a pretty cr@p deal - I had the same some years ago, so you have my sympathies. Yes you might prefer to move on (bad memories etc) which is entirely understandable, but moving also has a price (mail redirection, hassle of remembering to contact everyone who might need to contact you by post, removal costs etc). Factor this in to the cost analysis.

Some LL's/agencies etc might forgo the references if you are prepared to pay a wodge up front (6 month's rental say). Not ideal but good to know your options.

If you really want to move, have you tried Gumtree?

Best of luck.

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Thanks for the replies.

I have not done much research.

I have a break clause starting in January 2010 and the ex is moving out at the end of October.

I have some redundancy insurance that will help me not dig into savings, even paying the full rent, so I am not too worried so far. My lifestyle will be lower than now probably.

But there will be 3-4 months maximum.

I just don't want to move to something crap because I have no job and having to move again in 6 months when I hopefully find a new position.

My LL likes us a tenants but I doubt he will lower the rent by say £200 pcm for me (paying near £1400pcm now).

I might have to find a flatmate for my single room ( I am in a 2bed flat but second room is tiny - we use it as study) for a few months I guess.

And for the one who asked : she was fit indeed.

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Thanks for the replies.

I have not done much research.

I have a break clause starting in January 2010 and the ex is moving out at the end of October.

I have some redundancy insurance that will help me not dig into savings, even paying the full rent, so I am not too worried so far. My lifestyle will be lower than now probably.

But there will be 3-4 months maximum.

I just don't want to move to something crap because I have no job and having to move again in 6 months when I hopefully find a new position.

My LL likes us a tenants but I doubt he will lower the rent by say £200 pcm for me (paying near £1400pcm now).

I might have to find a flatmate for my single room ( I am in a 2bed flat but second room is tiny - we use it as study) for a few months I guess.

And for the one who asked : she was fit indeed.

What and where on earth are you renting that costs almost £1400 for a 2 bed flat with a tiny 2nd bedroom? (Laaahdon?) We are just about to move into a 3 bed, 2 public, all large rooms, bungalow with huge garden for £800 pcm.

If it's just for 6 months because you are confident of finding something new then what's the hardship in renting somewhere "crap"? Even if you get the new job soon enough, would a 1 bed be such hardship?

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