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Guest Disposable Heroes

Skywatchers Set For Meteor Shower

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Guest DisposableHeroes

Skygazers are getting ready to watch the annual Perseid meteor shower, which peaks on Wednesday.

The Perseid shower occurs when the Earth passes through a stream of dusty debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle.

As this cometary "grit" strikes our atmosphere, it burns up, often creating streaks of light across the sky.

This impressive spectacle appears to originate from a point called a "radiant" in the constellation of Perseus - hence the name Perseid.

"Earth passes through the densest part of the debris stream sometime on 12 August. Then, you could see dozens of meteors per hour," said Bill Cooke of Nasa's meteoroid environment office.

No special equipment is required to watch the sky show. Astronomers say binoculars might help, but will also restrict the view to a small part of the sky.

The Perseids can appear in any part of the sky, but their tails all point back to the radiant in the constellation Perseus.

In the UK, the best times to see the Perseids are likely to be on the morning of 12 August before dawn and from late evening on the 12th through to the early hours of the 13 August.

This year, light from the last quarter Moon will interfere significantly with the view.

The rock and dust fragments which cause the shower were left behind by Comet Swift-Tuttle when it last came near the Sun.

The comet orbits the Sun once every 130 years and last swept through the inner Solar System in 1992.

Skygazers are getting ready to watch the annual Perseid meteor shower, which peaks on Wednesday.

The Perseid shower occurs when the Earth passes through a stream of dusty debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle.

As this cometary "grit" strikes our atmosphere, it burns up, often creating streaks of light across the sky.

This impressive spectacle appears to originate from a point called a "radiant" in the constellation of Perseus - hence the name Perseid.

"Earth passes through the densest part of the debris stream sometime on 12 August. Then, you could see dozens of meteors per hour," said Bill Cooke of Nasa's meteoroid environment office.

No special equipment is required to watch the sky show. Astronomers say binoculars might help, but will also restrict the view to a small part of the sky.

The Perseids can appear in any part of the sky, but their tails all point back to the radiant in the constellation Perseus.

In the UK, the best times to see the Perseids are likely to be on the morning of 12 August before dawn and from late evening on the 12th through to the early hours of the 13 August.

This year, light from the last quarter Moon will interfere significantly with the view.

The rock and dust fragments which cause the shower were left behind by Comet Swift-Tuttle when it last came near the Sun.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/8193769.stm

Coats on - hope it's clear.

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Don't look at them - you may go blind and then you will not be able to escape the triffids... unless you live in a light-house near loads of salt water in which you are OK....

Bit of a bad planning error there on behalf of the triffids... I mean, invade a planet which is mostly composed of the one thing that kills you. A bit like marriage I suspect! :blink:

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Guest X-QUORK

"Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us."

Wee-oooh, wee-oooh, wee-oooh.

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This is a pointless exercise in northern europe

I once saw it from Cyprus and it was - spectacular.

It's impossible to adequately describe witnessing the sheer scale and speed of something other worldly such as this. Crystal clear, insanely bright, multi-coloured comets with tails hundreds of miles long travelling thousands of miles in a few seconds, traversing the whole sky from horizon to horizon.

Like a sci-fi movie but played out on a curved hi-def screen that is tens of thousands of miles across.

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Guest Parry aka GOD
"Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us."

Wee-oooh, wee-oooh, wee-oooh.

:lol:

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Guest DisposableHeroes
"Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us."

Wee-oooh, wee-oooh, wee-oooh.

My neighbours aren't as smart as yours by the sounds of it. They are squealers though, at it all the bloody time.

Shouldn't put me off the comets though.

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Don't look at them - you may go blind and then you will not be able to escape the triffids... unless you live in a light-house near loads of salt water in which you are OK....

Bit of a bad planning error there on behalf of the triffids... I mean, invade a planet which is mostly composed of the one thing that kills you. A bit like marriage I suspect! :blink:

That was the crap film version. Read the book!

The Triffids didn't invade. They were man made genetic creations to be grown for fuel IIRC. John Wyndhams warning to us all!

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Don't confuse comets with meteors. The latter are small bits of rock which enter our atmosphere. Comets are much larger and if they strike us, it might be curtains for all.

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"Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us."

What, Goldman Sachs?

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Guest DisposableHeroes
Don't confuse comets with meteors. The latter are small bits of rock which enter our atmosphere. Comets are much larger and if they strike us, it might be curtains for all.

I should really read my own post :)

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Skygazers are getting ready to watch the annual Perseid meteor shower, which peaks on Wednesday.

The Perseid shower occurs when the Earth passes through a stream of dusty debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle.

As this cometary "grit" strikes our atmosphere, it burns up, often creating streaks of light across the sky.

This impressive spectacle appears to originate from a point called a "radiant" in the constellation of Perseus - hence the name Perseid.

"Earth passes through the densest part of the debris stream sometime on 12 August. Then, you could see dozens of meteors per hour," said Bill Cooke of Nasa's meteoroid environment office.

No special equipment is required to watch the sky show. Astronomers say binoculars might help, but will also restrict the view to a small part of the sky.

The Perseids can appear in any part of the sky, but their tails all point back to the radiant in the constellation Perseus.

In the UK, the best times to see the Perseids are likely to be on the morning of 12 August before dawn and from late evening on the 12th through to the early hours of the 13 August.

This year, light from the last quarter Moon will interfere significantly with the view.

The rock and dust fragments which cause the shower were left behind by Comet Swift-Tuttle when it last came near the Sun.

The comet orbits the Sun once every 130 years and last swept through the inner Solar System in 1992.

Skygazers are getting ready to watch the annual Perseid meteor shower, which peaks on Wednesday.

The Perseid shower occurs when the Earth passes through a stream of dusty debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle.

As this cometary "grit" strikes our atmosphere, it burns up, often creating streaks of light across the sky.

This impressive spectacle appears to originate from a point called a "radiant" in the constellation of Perseus - hence the name Perseid.

"Earth passes through the densest part of the debris stream sometime on 12 August. Then, you could see dozens of meteors per hour," said Bill Cooke of Nasa's meteoroid environment office.

No special equipment is required to watch the sky show. Astronomers say binoculars might help, but will also restrict the view to a small part of the sky.

The Perseids can appear in any part of the sky, but their tails all point back to the radiant in the constellation Perseus.

In the UK, the best times to see the Perseids are likely to be on the morning of 12 August before dawn and from late evening on the 12th through to the early hours of the 13 August.

This year, light from the last quarter Moon will interfere significantly with the view.

The rock and dust fragments which cause the shower were left behind by Comet Swift-Tuttle when it last came near the Sun.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/8193769.stm

Coats on - hope it's clear.

I'm bumping you ( nothing naughty) as I just saw one, will take a mug of tea and have a peaceful hour watching for more, very clear here in Devon.

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