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What Was The Wizard Of Oz Really About?

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OK - I guess a lot of pm enthusiasts will know what the wizard of oz is really about (or best perceived to be about), but here's some background for those of you who don't............

jenningsbryan.jpg

excerpt:

There are many variant readings of The Wizard of Oz. I see it as an election story, and read it against the amazingly intense elections of 1896 and 1900 when Democrat William Jennings Bryan ran against Republican William McKinley. At that time there was a profound hope by the pro-Bryan forces (silverites) that they could create a political revolution to overthrow the evils of the reactionary industrial order -- but what would the revolution be like? 1896 was a time of severe depression -- much like 1932. Making silver money at the ratio of 16 ounces of silver to 1 ounce of gold was their formula. In a vastly popular pamphlet Coin's Financial School the teenage fictional hero "Coin" argued there was lots of silver out West, but the world's small stock of gold was controlled by wicked bankers in New York and London.

......./........

and of course, the story today continues.....

Hugo Salinas Price: Dorothy's silver slippers...

Hugo Salinas Price, president of the Mexican Civic Association for Silver and the world's foremost advocate of restoring silver's role as a circulating currency, addressed GATA's recent conference in Washington by video. His address, "Dorothy's Silver Slippers," detailed his proposal for the issuance of a circulating silver ounce coin for Mexico -- a coin that, not being imprinted with any particular peso value, would never be at risk of withdrawal from circulation because its melt value had come to exceed its face value.

Salinas Price's address to the GATA conference is 23 minutes long and you can find it in three parts at

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I always though it was about the people v state. The wizard is all bluster but in reality he has no power beyond that. The people are the scarecrow, the tin man, and the lion. They lack brains, a heart and courage. This allows the wizard to rule since any of these would lead to revolt. The witches are the police.

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Political sources

Many of the events and characters of the book resemble the actual political personalities, events and ideas of the 1890s.[7] The 1902 stage adaptation mentioned, by name, President Theodore Roosevelt, oil magnate John D. Rockefeller, and other political celebrities.[7] (No real people are mentioned by name in the book.) Even the title has been interpreted as alluding to a political reality: oz. is an abbreviation for ounce, a unit familiar to those who fought for a 16 to 1 ounce ratio of silver to gold in the name of bimetallism, though Baum stated he got the name from a file cabinet labeled A-N and O-Z. It should also be noted, however, that in later books Baum mentions contemporary figures by name and takes blatantly political stances without the benefit of allegory including a condemnation in no uncertain terms of Standard Oil.

The book opens not in an imaginary place but in real life Kansas, which, in the 1890s as well as today, was well known for the hardships of rural life, and for destructive tornadoes. The Panic of 1893 caused widespread distress in the rural United States. Dorothy is swept away to a colorful land of unlimited resources that nevertheless has serious political problems.[7] This utopia is ruled in part by wicked witches. Dorothy and her house are swept up by the tornado and upon landing in Oz, the house falls on the Wicked Witch of the East, destroying the tyrant and freeing the ordinary people--little people or Munchkins. The Witch had previously controlled the all-powerful silver slippers (which were changed to ruby in the 1939 film). The slippers will in the end liberate Dorothy but first she must walk in them down the golden yellow brick road, i.e. she must take silver down the path of gold, the path of free coinage. Following the road of gold leads eventually only to the Emerald City, which may symbolize the fraudulent world of greenback paper money that only pretends to have value, or may symbolize the greenback value that is placed on gold (and for silver, possibly).[7] Other allegorical devices of the book include:

* Dorothy, naïve, young and simple, represents the American people. Also Dorothy can represent the workers of the union. She is Everyman, led astray and who seeks the way back home.[7] She resembles the young hero of Coin's financial school, a very popular political pamphlet of 1893. Another interpretation holds that she is a representation of Theodore Roosevelt: note that the syllables "Dor-o-thy" are the reverse of the syllables "The-o-dore."

* The cyclone was used in the 1890s as a metaphor for a political revolution that would transform the drab country into a land of color and unlimited prosperity. The cyclone was used by editorial cartoonists of the 1890s to represent political upheaval.[7]

* Historians and economists who read the original 1900 book as a political allegory interpret the Tin Woodman as the dehumanized industrial worker, badly mistreated by the Wicked Witch of the East who rules Munchkin Country before the cyclone creates a political revolution and kills her. The Woodman is rusted and helpless—ineffective until he starts to work together with the Scarecrow (the farmer), in a Farmer-Labor coalition that was much discussed in the 1890s, which culminated in the successful Farmer-Labor Party in Minnesota and its eventual merger with the Minnesota Democratic Party to form the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party in 1944.

* The Munchkins are the little people—ordinary citizens. This 1897 Judge cartoon shows famous politicians as little people after they were on the losing side in the election. However, in Oz the Munchkins are all dressed similarly in blue, unlike these caricatures.

While the allegorical interpretation referring to Baum's specific politics has come under significant scrutiny based primarily on interpreting the Populist movement and the political atmosphere of the late 19th century largely through a contemporary lens. While it is well known that Baum was a supporter of women's suffrage, there no tangible evidence of his support for minorities. Moreover, while it was claimed that Baum was a supporter of William Jennings Bryan and had marched with him, the evidence suggests quite the opposite. Bradley A. Hansen counter-claims the view of Baum as a Democratic supporter with evidence of his numerous writings in favour of Republican politics (which would have been far more appropriate at that time). In essence, while there is strong reason to believe in a Populist message embedded within Baum's work, most of the original evidence was in fact quite baseless.[8]

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Hmmmm, berry berry interesting.

Thanks.

OK - I guess a lot of pm enthusiasts will know what the wizard of oz is really about (or best perceived to be about), but here's some background for those of you who don't............

jenningsbryan.jpg

excerpt:

There are many variant readings of The Wizard of Oz. I see it as an election story, and read it against the amazingly intense elections of 1896 and 1900 when Democrat William Jennings Bryan ran against Republican William McKinley. At that time there was a profound hope by the pro-Bryan forces (silverites) that they could create a political revolution to overthrow the evils of the reactionary industrial order -- but what would the revolution be like? 1896 was a time of severe depression -- much like 1932. Making silver money at the ratio of 16 ounces of silver to 1 ounce of gold was their formula. In a vastly popular pamphlet Coin's Financial School the teenage fictional hero "Coin" argued there was lots of silver out West, but the world's small stock of gold was controlled by wicked bankers in New York and London.

......./........

and of course, the story today continues.....

Hugo Salinas Price: Dorothy's silver slippers...

Hugo Salinas Price, president of the Mexican Civic Association for Silver and the world's foremost advocate of restoring silver's role as a circulating currency, addressed GATA's recent conference in Washington by video. His address, "Dorothy's Silver Slippers," detailed his proposal for the issuance of a circulating silver ounce coin for Mexico -- a coin that, not being imprinted with any particular peso value, would never be at risk of withdrawal from circulation because its melt value had come to exceed its face value.

Salinas Price's address to the GATA conference is 23 minutes long and you can find it in three parts at

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../..

and of course, the story today continues.....

Hugo Salinas Price: Dorothy's silver slippers...

Hugo Salinas Price, president of the Mexican Civic Association for Silver and the world's foremost advocate of restoring silver's role as a circulating currency, addressed GATA's recent conference in Washington by video. His address, "Dorothy's Silver Slippers," detailed his proposal for the issuance of a circulating silver ounce coin for Mexico -- a coin that, not being imprinted with any particular peso value, would never be at risk of withdrawal from circulation because its melt value had come to exceed its face value.

Salinas Price's address to the GATA conference is 23 minutes long and you can find it in three parts at

jenningsbryan-294x300.jpg
20110514-gbbsyensajk5tnrwac3hfpc692.jpg
Edited by p.p.

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I tried the book a couple of years ago because of internet talk about its hidden meaning.

Fell asleep after five minutes. Seriously dull. Stick with the film.

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I recommend Bill Still's film on this subject:

Spaniard, this is about the most important documentary anyone could watch and as previously I am with you in regard to Monetary reform. I urge people to watch this and in particular from 1 hr 30 to the end - Excellent.

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