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Recession 'drives Thousands To Use Anti-depressant Pills'

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-...sant-pills.html

The recession is being blamed for a steep rise in the number of people taking anti-depressants.

Doctors in London alone handed out nearly 3.27m prescriptions last year - a rise of 188,252 in 12 months.

Figures also show that the NHS drugs bill for treating mental health problems such as depression and anxiety is £24.3m since the beginning of last year. This is despite a reduction in the cost of anti-depressants.

One mental health charity said it was not surprised about the rise given the stresses caused by the recession. But it emphasised that pills were not the only answer.

Victoria Walsh, campaigns manager of Rethink, said: 'This shows there is a need for additional psychological therapies as anti-depressants alone are not the most effective way to deal with depression.'

The figures from the NHS Information Centre cover the 31 London primary care trusts, and refer to a wide range of anti-depressants including Prozac and Seroxat.

They show that 3.27m prescriptions were given in the 12 months to April this year, up from 3.08m the previous year.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-...l#ixzz0Mt9DyuQC

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Great... it probably is making things much worse since ungood things happen when a healthy brain chemistry is being messed with this way, so if people had no problem so far, they sure have at least one now.

Depression is a good example why sometimes using latin names for medical conditions spares people from making unhealthy associations -- lots of people confuse depression with normal, healthy sadness.

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Great... it probably is making things much worse since ungood things happen when a healthy brain chemistry is being messed with this way, so if people had no problem so far, they sure have at least one now.

Depression is a good example why sometimes using latin names for medical conditions spares people from making unhealthy associations -- lots of people confuse depression with normal, healthy sadness.

My doctor has prescribed me beta blockers. I am supposed to take 3 a day. I have had just one and they are very effective, reminds me of taking an E. Pharmacutical high, marvellous! They are candy.

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The ultimate in Don't Worry Be Happy pills.

Prozac and Seroxat are SSRI (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors) are pretty pernicious in my experience. Although it is claimed that they are less likely to cause physical dependency than tricyclic anti depressants the anecdotal evidence out there suggests they are very hard to quit once taken regularly without some very nasty side effects (Seroxat is particularly bad in this respect).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selective_ser...ptake_inhibitor

Prescribing rules mean doctors are now virtually forced to dish out these drugs to the depressed whether they want to or not.

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Prescribing rules mean doctors are now virtually forced to dish out these drugs to the depressed whether they want to or not.

I think you may be right. A friend reported suicidal feelings 6 weeks in when she took prozac, a couple of years later another friend killed himself 6 weeks in to his prescribed anti depressants. He was in such a bad way, but I asked him to think carefully, that the drugs were a one way street, but at the same time, nothing else was working, so even I thought they might help. I know better now and these drugs should be avoided by you and yours like the plague.

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When I was a poor student, I did some drug trials for money. I spent 8 weeks on anti-depressants (and blood thinner) to see how the AD affected the BT.

All I can say is that they are horrible things. OK if a guy is close to suicide and all you are doing is buying time, however it is like being permanently stoned, and you have no way of dealing with the problem that made you depressed in the first place.

Personally I'd spend a week in a health spar in Thailand, then 2 weeks at a non-touristy beach, and try to work things out for myself.

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When I was a poor student, I did some drug trials for money.

Lucky you! In my day we had to buy our own, :blink:

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When I was a poor student, I did some drug trials for money. I spent 8 weeks on anti-depressants (and blood thinner) to see how the AD affected the BT.

All I can say is that they are horrible things. OK if a guy is close to suicide and all you are doing is buying time, however it is like being permanently stoned, and you have no way of dealing with the problem that made you depressed in the first place.

Personally I'd spend a week in a health spar in Thailand, then 2 weeks at a non-touristy beach, and try to work things out for myself.

That is not how those things work tho -- you had no need for them, so they made you feel strange (as they would).

Someone who has brain chemistry problems that cause depression will be affected differently to you tho and more likely to be 'normalised' instead of 'stoned'.

Which is why depression is not sadness and vice versa, sadness does not cure with drugs, depression however may be sorted out that way.

And if you have depression, no amount of sitting on beaches will help you there, just like no amount of anti-depression drugs can will help you with sadness.

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Guest pioneer31
The ultimate in Don't Worry Be Happy pills.

Prozac and Seroxat are SSRI (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors) are pretty pernicious in my experience. Although it is claimed that they are less likely to cause physical dependency than tricyclic anti depressants the anecdotal evidence out there suggests they are very hard to quit once taken regularly without some very nasty side effects (Seroxat is particularly bad in this respect).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selective_ser...ptake_inhibitor

Prescribing rules mean doctors are now virtually forced to dish out these drugs to the depressed whether they want to or not.

I'm sick of doctors. They're just legalised drug pushers.

Feeling down? Have a brain chemistry altering drug.

Feeling sniffly? Have the only antiobiotic that works anymore. (penicillin)

By the way I was prescribed Seroxat years ago before I knew better. Took it for a few days and thankfully it made me feel sick, so I discontinued it.

It has since been found to be nasty stuff, as you say.

Here's my advice, don't take anti-depressants. GP's don't understand nearly enough about the brain to warrant dabbling with it. If you're seriously depressed you will go to hospital, if you're not, you need NON-DRUG therapy.

It's probaby entirely normal to be depressed right now. The country is totally FUBAR'd

Edited by pioneer31

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Guest AuntJess
I'm sick of doctors. They're just legalised drug pushers.

Feeling down? Have a brain chemistry altering drug.

Feeling sniffly? Have the only antiobiotic that works anymore. (penicillin)

By the way I was prescribed Seroxat years ago before I knew better. Took it for a few days and thankfully it made me feel sick, so I discontinued it.

It has since been found to be nasty stuff, as you say.

Here's my advice, don't take anti-depressants. GP's don't understand nearly enough about the brain to warrant dabbling with it. If you're seriously depressed you will go to hospital, if you're not, you need NON-DRUG therapy.

It's probaby entirely normal to be depressed right now. The country is totally FUBAR'd

Totally agree. Depression is characterised by an abnormally low mood. As a mental health professional, I can attest that NOT to be depressed in today's climate, is to be abnormal, as Pi31 says. Anyone out there who's deliriously happy is well worth avoiding, IMO. :rolleyes:

We are being turned into a nation of automatons and junkies. FGS - resist!!!

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Counseling is far more effective at treating anxiety than drugs, all they do is mask the problem. Only problem is, getting hold of a counselor :blink:

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Guest skullingtonjoe
My doctor has prescribed me beta blockers. I am supposed to take 3 a day. I have had just one and they are very effective, reminds me of taking an E. Pharmacutical high, marvellous! They are candy.

Have a go on Diazepam - it`s like the drug from `Equlibrium` and blocks out all those nasty unpleasant thoughts. Warning: it is addicitive though...

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Guest skullingtonjoe
Counseling is far more effective at treating anxiety than drugs, all they do is mask the problem. Only problem is, getting hold of a counselor :blink:

Waiting list over 1 year if you use the NHS. :(

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That is not how those things work tho -- you had no need for them, so they made you feel strange (as they would).

Someone who has brain chemistry problems that cause depression will be affected differently to you tho and more likely to be 'normalised' instead of 'stoned'.

Which is why depression is not sadness and vice versa, sadness does not cure with drugs, depression however may be sorted out that way.

And if you have depression, no amount of sitting on beaches will help you there, just like no amount of anti-depression drugs can will help you with sadness.

Most depressive episodes last less than 12-18 months but many people are being prescribed SSRIs for years on end (a member of my family has been taking them for over 5 years). They all basically work by interfering with the process by which the brain reabsorbs Serotonin and the long term impact of tampering with this mechanism is poorly understood. In my experience over time they seem to lose some of their effectiveness in controlling anxiety and depression which means the medics start upping the dose. Given that the human body is capable of producing Serotonin from amino acids such as Trytophan which are present in some every day food stuffs then one wonders why diet is not looked at more closely in the treatment of this condition but then that would mean Doctors having to know about nutrition which is an area where most are surprisingly ignorant

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tryptophan

I am sure that SSRIs have a place in managing some cases of depression but the evidence suggests that they are not much more effective in treating the condition than the tricyclic anti-depressants they replaced. Unfortunately, those who present this condition to a GP are unlikely to be given much in the way of options as the NHS seems wedded to one club golf bags

Edited by stenosis

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People should be taking to the streets protesting and rioting not sedating themselves.

Its a cop out from actually addressing the problems we face.

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Have a go on Diazepam - it`s like the drug from `Equlibrium` and blocks out all those nasty unpleasant thoughts. Warning: it is addicitive though...

I appreciate having them there in the event of a bad panic attack, but I am not going to take them, my doctor advised me to try one to test for allergic reactions rather than wait for a stressful situation to present itself. I am addressing the core problem which is a very bad MD, just working out my exit strategy. Seems silly to have to take drugs just to cope with a mentally ill mamager!

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I don't get this depression thing - whilst I am sure some people are genuinely depressed and that this is medical, I think many others just like it as a diagnosis as its something to clutch onto and they quite like the pills. Others also like to classify view points that differ from their own as negative or depressive - which to me smacks of VI attempts to "re-educate".

People who know me would consider me somewhat negative and a bit of a profit of doom, though I hope they respect my views and appreciate I am often right on subjects where they are hopelessly over optimistic. On my part being like this does not make me depressed, just realistic. I do worry about the happy clappy tendencies in our society as it leads a lot of people to make mistakes and take risks that they will later regret. I am all for risk taking, but calculated risk, not foolhardy risk.

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Guest skullingtonjoe
I appreciate having them there in the event of a bad panic attack, but I am not going to take them, my doctor advised me to try one to test for allergic reactions rather than wait for a stressful situation to present itself. I am addressing the core problem which is a very bad MD, just working out my exit strategy. Seems silly to have to take drugs just to cope with a mentally ill mamager!

I should clarify - I was being a little bit ironic. I would not advocate that anyone takes Diazepam unless they are in a really really fu<ked-up way. I have severe mental health problems (including a sectioning in a mental health unit), and it is no fun having mental health problems at all. I can write on this forum because I have a daily shot of prozac, lamotrigine (mood stabiliser), beta blockers (propranlol) and haloperidol (anti-psychotic). (I am one of the less severe cases by the way).

My view is that dishing out tablets is no solution to the problems that we face:

1. The breakdown of society ( and the perceived futility of going to work when benefits will pay for you).

2. Related to (1) - the wholesale destruction of this country`s manufacturing base and `real` jobs (instead of vapourwork).

3. Related to (1) - the proliferation of the chav classes.

4. A general perception that it is no longer safe to go about one`s business, and that if you try to defend yourself you will be nicked and prosecuted.

5. Irresponsibility committed by those who are supposed to set an example (e.g the Westminster crowd).

6. Feelings of alienation and isolation; mistrust of others.

7. Apathy and helplessness on a national scale.

Some things would help. For example, bringing back the `closed Sunday` would help if - and only if - we could get out of this `24-hour` culture. There`s no time for people to stop, think and take stock of what`s going on in their lives. Those who have got jobs are run ragged and I`m sure this is contributing to a wave of burnouts / nervous breakdowns. Having met mental illness face-to-face I wouldn`t wish it on anyone.

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Guest skullingtonjoe
I don't get this depression thing - whilst I am sure some people are genuinely depressed and that this is medical, I think many others just like it as a diagnosis as its something to clutch onto and they quite like the pills. Others also like to classify view points that differ from their own as negative or depressive - which to me smacks of VI attempts to "re-educate".

People who know me would consider me somewhat negative and a bit of a profit of doom, though I hope they respect my views and appreciate I am often right on subjects where they are hopelessly over optimistic. On my part being like this does not make me depressed, just realistic. I do worry about the happy clappy tendencies in our society as it leads a lot of people to make mistakes and take risks that they will later regret. I am all for risk taking, but calculated risk, not foolhardy risk.

Good point - when does `being miserable` become `depressed`?

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I should clarify - I was being a little bit ironic. I would not advocate that anyone takes Diazepam unless they are in a really really fu<ked-up way. I have severe mental health problems (including a sectioning in a mental health unit), and it is no fun having mental health problems at all. I can write on this forum because I have a daily shot of prozac, lamotrigine (mood stabiliser), beta blockers (propranlol) and haloperidol (anti-psychotic). (I am one of the less severe cases by the way).

My view is that dishing out tablets is no solution to the problems that we face:

1. The breakdown of society ( and the perceived futility of going to work when benefits will pay for you).

2. Related to (1) - the wholesale destruction of this country`s manufacturing base and `real` jobs (instead of vapourwork).

3. Related to (1) - the proliferation of the chav classes.

4. A general perception that it is no longer safe to go about one`s business, and that if you try to defend yourself you will be nicked and prosecuted.

5. Irresponsibility committed by those who are supposed to set an example (e.g the Westminster crowd).

6. Feelings of alienation and isolation; mistrust of others.

7. Apathy and helplessness on a national scale.

Some things would help. For example, bringing back the `closed Sunday` would help if - and only if - we could get out of this `24-hour` culture. There`s no time for people to stop, think and take stock of what`s going on in their lives. Those who have got jobs are run ragged and I`m sure this is contributing to a wave of burnouts / nervous breakdowns. Having met mental illness face-to-face I wouldn`t wish it on anyone.

Is there a dividing line between depression and mental illness? My friend was mentally ill, it wasn't about depression. 20 years of smoking dope might not have helped. His mind seemed to stop processing information and moving on, it was like he got stuck in a feedback loop. I wished he had received better care, and, like you, was managing. I describe my current MD as mentally ill as he is a complete fantasist, pathologically so, but he is not depressed. Underlying security problems. He uses his staff as an audience for his delusions. The guy needs his nose rubbed in reality, don't think there is a drug for that.

Agree with the points you made, although you can make a personal choice to drop out of the 24/7 culture. My Sundays are sacred! :)

I do think an entire society can become slightly deranged. A realist nowadays is called negative, I see this everywhere.

Heartily agree with point 4.

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