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Gloating In The Sunday Times Property Section

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July 26, 2009

How to cash in on the credit crunch

The past two years of financial turmoil haven’t been disastrous for everyone - some investors have come out on top

http://property.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life...icle6726840.ece

The old adage that someone must be making money when others are losing it is as true of bricks and mortar as it is of the bulls and bears of the stock market. Two years after “credit crunch†entered our vocabulary, and almost 12 months after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, which virtually felled the housing market overnight, a group of definite “winners†has emerged from the rubble.

While the majority of homeowners bolted their doors and chose to sit out the worst price falls in a generation, a fortunate few preferred to take their chance. They have managed to make the most of the downturn thanks to clever dealing, far-sightedness, serendipity or a mixture of all three.

The lucky ones include investors who monitored the market with a hawkish eye and snapped up repossession and auction properties when they felt prices were close to or had reached the bottom, families who took the risk to jump several steps up the property ladder, and gazumpers who squeezed other bidders out at the crucial moment. All benefited from desperate, debt-ridden sellers, decreased competition and substantial price reductions.

The dramatic nature of the deterioration in the housing market is further reflected in the fact that monthly transactions in the UK fell from 160,000 per month in August 2007 to only 41,000 in January this year.

“This downturn has been quicker and deeper than any we have seen before,†says Lucian Cook, director of residential research at Savills estate agency. “According to the Nationwide, it took just 16 months for prices to fall by 20%. By contrast, in the first 18 months of the 1990s slump, prices fell by 13%, taking a full three years to fall by a fifth. In prime central London, we saw the biggest ever quarterly price fall, 8.7%, in the period following Lehman Brothers’ collapse in September.†[NOTE: PAST TENSE, AS IN ITS OVER ;) ]

The dream, of course, is to sell at the top of the market and buy back in at the bottom, but this is a tricky manoeuvre to pull off. It requires a steely nerve and the ability to move quickly when required.

“We’ve had several cases in the past year where we have completed within a day — putting in an offer in the morning and exchanging that evening,†says Simon Thomas, a partner at Thomas Legal Group, which has offices in London and Gloucester. He says this was especially common with deals of £3m-£6m involving cash buyers.

Timing is crucial. Thomas cites one client who purchased seven acres of land near Borehamwood, in Hertfordshire, at the bottom of the market in May this year for £2.5m and sold it this month for £5.25m — more than double the original price — without doing a thing.

“He jumped ahead of the people who were going to buy the land by getting the deal through fast,†he says. “The original buyers were so gutted at losing out first time round, they bought from my client for the increased price.†[iF TRUE, SOUNDS LIKE A COMPLETE ONE-OFF. WHAT RELEVANCE DOES IT HAVE TO ORDINARY PURCHASES UP AND DOWN THE COUNTRY?]

Another way to come out on top in a recession is to upsize: that way, the hit in value that you take on the property you are selling is smaller than the premium you are gaining on your new, much larger home.

“The people who have benefited most are those who had the guts to make a really big jump,†says Phil Tennant, regional sales director of Hamptons estate agency. “Buyers might have lost 20% from peak to trough on the value of their home, but if they sold a £500,000 home and traded up to a £1m house, they will have ‘saved’ £100,000. They can also expect to enjoy future capital growth based on a much larger property, now that we’ve hit bottom.â€

Tennant admits that such homeowners tend to be those who could afford to take a bit of a risk — “although most who come out as winners have their element of luck.â€

[sUMS THIS PIECE UP NICELY - A SHOWCASE OF THE LUCKY (SOME ONLY TEMPORARILY I FEAR)]

Take a risk was exactly what Guy and Beatrice Emerson did. When, in February this year, they found out they were expecting a baby and needed more space, they imagined that their budget wouldn’t stretch to anything more than a small terrace in London, where they lived. Thanks to the property slump, however, they negotiated £220,000 off the price of their new home, a four-bedroom house in Chiswick, west London, which they bought for £730,000 — it was originally on the market for £950,000. They also sold their two-bedroom flat in the Isle of Dogs for £430,000, having paid £350,000 for it in 2006.

“We definitely got a good opportunity with the fall in prices,†says Beatrice, 32, a financial manager. “The house is bigger than anything we would have been able to afford in a normal market. It has a big garden and it’s a semi — we thought we were going to have to get a terraced house.â€[GUY? BEATRICE? TWO SOLIDLY MIDDLE CLASS NAMES, SO HOPEFULLY THE BANK OF MUM AND DAD HAS HELPED THEM BRIDGE THE GAP. OTHERWISE THEY LOOK WORRYINGLY OVERSTRETCHED, IMO]

Even among those who found they couldn’t sell and became so-called “reluctant landlordsâ€, there have been some accidental winners. “We had a couple who were thinking of selling their house in Fulham this time last year for £1.3m, but decided to rent the property out instead,†says Tennant. “They’ve just had an offer of £1.5m. In the meantime, they made money on the rent and they’ve saved on their tracker mortgage, which at one point went down to 0%.†[THE EXCEPTION OR THE RULE? WHAT RELEVANCE IS IT NOW? NOT LIKE YOU CAN PLAN FOR 0% RATES. JUST A CASE OF LUCK - RIGHT PLACE, RIGHT TIME. NOT EXACTLY A BLUEPRINT FOR ANYONE TO GO OFF AND BORROW 5-6X SALARY IS IT?]

The expectation of lower asking prices, low interest rates and higher rents was a tempting prospect for investors looking to increase their portfolio or acquire their first buy-to-let. Ever since agents around the country started declaring in muted whispers that the market had hit the bottom and that there were signs, albeit weak and sporadic, of green shoots, the desire not to miss low-price opportunities has grown — “So much so that some parents are using their children as a vehicle to plough money into property,†says George Franks, area director for the London-based estate agency Douglas & Gordon.

His clients are buying property for or with their children. “This generation is old enough to remember how quickly the market recovered after 1992,†he says. “They can now afford to invest and profit from the imminent upturn.â€

It’s not a simple case of timing, though — the secret of doing well in a recession is as much in the choice of location as of property and price. Douglas McWilliams, chief executive of the Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR), warns buyers to steer clear of anywhere with high rates of state employment rates, such as Cardiff, Newcastle and Belfast, where cutbacks in public spending will mean a bleak outlook for the rental market.

“Now is a good time to take advantage of comparatively low prices in places where property values will increase due to high demand, as in the southeast, or in historic cities such as Cambridge,†he says.

Robert O’Brien, a fortysomething IT consultant living in the university city, did just that. He seized the opportunity to sell his suburban terrace for £200,000 in February this year and invest in two properties in the centre.

“I reckon I must have bought on the day the market hit the bottom here,†says O’Brien, who paid £199,950 and £220,000 for two one-bedroom flats, one of which he is letting out. Five months later, prices in the development start at £240,000.

Another tranche of buyers has sought to boost the value of their investment, be it a plot of land or a rundown property, by gaining planning permission, thus increasing the potential asking price and taking advantage of a speedier planning system and out-of-work architects. The key to this approach has been getting consent quickly: this is often achieved by suggestions for a home within the footprint of an existing building, or one with eco-friendly features.

Other “winners†have negotiated lower prices for refurbs and home improvements. Elaine Duthie, 29, from Aberdeen, works full-time as an engineer with an oil company, but also has a buy-to-let portfolio of 10 flats in the city, which she has built up over six years.

“I saw the credit crunch as an opportunity to upgrade my flats,†she says. “Because of the downturn in work for tradesmen and furniture shops, I’ve got some great deals. I’ve spent £5,000 on one of my best flats, including new flooring, furniture and fittings, but I’ve been able to increase the rent from £950 to £1,200 per month.â€

Indeed, big bargains are out there, as retailers specialising in homeware have taken a huge hit since the start of the recession. In a bid to draw in customers, the big brands have been slashing prices by as much as 70%, making this a good time for people to renovate their home at a small fraction of the pre-crunch cost.

“The offers and discounts available in interiors shops mean that many people are in a better position to consider larger projects, such as kitchens and bathrooms, than they were a year or two ago,†says Rob Whitaker, head of Fired Earth.

Mark Williams has been taking full advantage of these offers to furnish the barn he is converting with his wife, Deborah, on the outskirts of village in rural Warwickshire.

Williams, 42, who runs Specialised Woodworking, a furniture company, bought the property at an auction four years ago for £361,000. “I’ve bought top-quality goods at good discounts, some of them quite dramatic,†he says. The couple have so far spent £30,000 on the cosmetic renovations, including sourcing materials from factory clearance sales. Williams even visited a quarry direct for his stone floors.

“It’s made the money go a lot further. I found a lavatory for £100, down from £700. My plasterer also dropped his daily rate from £220 to £150 — I didn’t even have to haggle.â€

Is it too late to cash in on the downturn? Not necessarily. Some agents are predicting a second drop in prices — a so-called “W-shaped recovery†— as the inevitable increase in interest rates hits the housing market. This means the opportunity to take the risk and make money on a second downturn may well present itself again. :blink::blink::blink::blink::blink:

Edited by uncle_monty

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...Take a risk was exactly what Guy and Beatrice Emerson did. When, in February this year, they found out they were expecting a baby and needed more space, they imagined that their budget wouldn’t stretch to anything more than a small terrace in London, where they lived. Thanks to the property slump, however, they negotiated £220,000 off the price of their new home, a four-bedroom house in Chiswick, west London, which they bought for £730,000 — it was originally on the market for £950,000. They also sold their two-bedroom flat in the Isle of Dogs for £430,000, having paid £350,000 for it in 2006.

“We definitely got a good opportunity with the fall in prices,†says Beatrice, 32, a financial manager. “The house is bigger than anything we would have been able to afford in a normal market. It has a big garden and it’s a semi — we thought we were going to have to get a terraced house...

No, Beatrice, it's bigger than anything you would have been able to afford in the later middle part of the first decade of the 21st Century. The chances are, based on your names and job titles, that it's massively unremarkable by any normal standards. I wonder how many of your neighbours born in the 40s, 50s, and 60s are professionals with names like Guy and Beatrice?

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July 26, 2009

How to cash in on the credit crunch

The past two years of financial turmoil haven’t been disastrous for everyone - some investors have come out on top

http://property.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life...icle6726840.ece

The old adage that someone must be making money when others are losing it is as true of bricks and mortar as it is of the bulls and bears of the stock market. Two years after “credit crunch†entered our vocabulary, and almost 12 months after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, which virtually felled the housing market overnight, a group of definite “winners†has emerged from the rubble.

While the majority of homeowners bolted their doors and chose to sit out the worst price falls in a generation, a fortunate few preferred to take their chance. They have managed to make the most of the downturn thanks to clever dealing, far-sightedness, serendipity or a mixture of all three.

The lucky ones include investors who monitored the market with a hawkish eye and snapped up repossession and auction properties when they felt prices were close to or had reached the bottom, families who took the risk to jump several steps up the property ladder, and gazumpers who squeezed other bidders out at the crucial moment. All benefited from desperate, debt-ridden sellers, decreased competition and substantial price reductions.

The dramatic nature of the deterioration in the housing market is further reflected in the fact that monthly transactions in the UK fell from 160,000 per month in August 2007 to only 41,000 in January this year.

“This downturn has been quicker and deeper than any we have seen before,†says Lucian Cook, director of residential research at Savills estate agency. “According to the Nationwide, it took just 16 months for prices to fall by 20%. By contrast, in the first 18 months of the 1990s slump, prices fell by 13%, taking a full three years to fall by a fifth. In prime central London, we saw the biggest ever quarterly price fall, 8.7%, in the period following Lehman Brothers’ collapse in September.†[NOTE: PAST TENSE, AS IN ITS OVER ;) ]

The dream, of course, is to sell at the top of the market and buy back in at the bottom, but this is a tricky manoeuvre to pull off. It requires a steely nerve and the ability to move quickly when required.

“We’ve had several cases in the past year where we have completed within a day �" putting in an offer in the morning and exchanging that evening,†says Simon Thomas, a partner at Thomas Legal Group, which has offices in London and Gloucester. He says this was especially common with deals of £3m-£6m involving cash buyers.

Timing is crucial. Thomas cites one client who purchased seven acres of land near Borehamwood, in Hertfordshire, at the bottom of the market in May this year for £2.5m and sold it this month for £5.25m �" more than double the original price �" without doing a thing.

“He jumped ahead of the people who were going to buy the land by getting the deal through fast,†he says. “The original buyers were so gutted at losing out first time round, they bought from my client for the increased price.†[iF TRUE, SOUNDS LIKE A COMPLETE ONE-OFF. WHAT RELEVANCE DOES IT HAVE TO ORDINARY PURCHASES UP AND DOWN THE COUNTRY?]

Another way to come out on top in a recession is to upsize: that way, the hit in value that you take on the property you are selling is smaller than the premium you are gaining on your new, much larger home.

“The people who have benefited most are those who had the guts to make a really big jump,†says Phil Tennant, regional sales director of Hamptons estate agency. “Buyers might have lost 20% from peak to trough on the value of their home, but if they sold a £500,000 home and traded up to a £1m house, they will have ‘saved’ £100,000. They can also expect to enjoy future capital growth based on a much larger property, now that we’ve hit bottom.â€

Tennant admits that such homeowners tend to be those who could afford to take a bit of a risk �" “although most who come out as winners have their element of luck.â€

[sUMS THIS PIECE UP NICELY - A SHOWCASE OF THE LUCKY (SOME ONLY TEMPORARILY I FEAR)]

Take a risk was exactly what Guy and Beatrice Emerson did. When, in February this year, they found out they were expecting a baby and needed more space, they imagined that their budget wouldn’t stretch to anything more than a small terrace in London, where they lived. Thanks to the property slump, however, they negotiated £220,000 off the price of their new home, a four-bedroom house in Chiswick, west London, which they bought for £730,000 �" it was originally on the market for £950,000. They also sold their two-bedroom flat in the Isle of Dogs for £430,000, having paid £350,000 for it in 2006.

“We definitely got a good opportunity with the fall in prices,†says Beatrice, 32, a financial manager. “The house is bigger than anything we would have been able to afford in a normal market. It has a big garden and it’s a semi �" we thought we were going to have to get a terraced house.â€[GUY? BEATRICE? TWO SOLIDLY MIDDLE CLASS NAMES, SO HOPEFULLY THE BANK OF MUM AND DAD HAS HELPED THEM BRIDGE THE GAP. OTHERWISE THEY LOOK WORRYINGLY OVERSTRETCHED, IMO]

Even among those who found they couldn’t sell and became so-called “reluctant landlordsâ€, there have been some accidental winners. “We had a couple who were thinking of selling their house in Fulham this time last year for £1.3m, but decided to rent the property out instead,†says Tennant. “They’ve just had an offer of £1.5m. In the meantime, they made money on the rent and they’ve saved on their tracker mortgage, which at one point went down to 0%.†[THE EXCEPTION OR THE RULE? WHAT RELEVANCE IS IT NOW? NOT LIKE YOU CAN PLAN FOR 0% RATES. JUST A CASE OF LUCK - RIGHT PLACE, RIGHT TIME. NOT EXACTLY A BLUEPRINT FOR ANYONE TO GO OFF AND BORROW 5-6X SALARY IS IT?]

The expectation of lower asking prices, low interest rates and higher rents was a tempting prospect for investors looking to increase their portfolio or acquire their first buy-to-let. Ever since agents around the country started declaring in muted whispers that the market had hit the bottom and that there were signs, albeit weak and sporadic, of green shoots, the desire not to miss low-price opportunities has grown �" “So much so that some parents are using their children as a vehicle to plough money into property,†says George Franks, area director for the London-based estate agency Douglas & Gordon.

His clients are buying property for or with their children. “This generation is old enough to remember how quickly the market recovered after 1992,†he says. “They can now afford to invest and profit from the imminent upturn.â€

It’s not a simple case of timing, though �" the secret of doing well in a recession is as much in the choice of location as of property and price. Douglas McWilliams, chief executive of the Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR), warns buyers to steer clear of anywhere with high rates of state employment rates, such as Cardiff, Newcastle and Belfast, where cutbacks in public spending will mean a bleak outlook for the rental market.

“Now is a good time to take advantage of comparatively low prices in places where property values will increase due to high demand, as in the southeast, or in historic cities such as Cambridge,†he says.

Robert O’Brien, a fortysomething IT consultant living in the university city, did just that. He seized the opportunity to sell his suburban terrace for £200,000 in February this year and invest in two properties in the centre.

“I reckon I must have bought on the day the market hit the bottom here,†says O’Brien, who paid £199,950 and £220,000 for two one-bedroom flats, one of which he is letting out. Five months later, prices in the development start at £240,000.

Another tranche of buyers has sought to boost the value of their investment, be it a plot of land or a rundown property, by gaining planning permission, thus increasing the potential asking price and taking advantage of a speedier planning system and out-of-work architects. The key to this approach has been getting consent quickly: this is often achieved by suggestions for a home within the footprint of an existing building, or one with eco-friendly features.

Other “winners†have negotiated lower prices for refurbs and home improvements. Elaine Duthie, 29, from Aberdeen, works full-time as an engineer with an oil company, but also has a buy-to-let portfolio of 10 flats in the city, which she has built up over six years.

“I saw the credit crunch as an opportunity to upgrade my flats,†she says. “Because of the downturn in work for tradesmen and furniture shops, I’ve got some great deals. I’ve spent £5,000 on one of my best flats, including new flooring, furniture and fittings, but I’ve been able to increase the rent from £950 to £1,200 per month.â€

Indeed, big bargains are out there, as retailers specialising in homeware have taken a huge hit since the start of the recession. In a bid to draw in customers, the big brands have been slashing prices by as much as 70%, making this a good time for people to renovate their home at a small fraction of the pre-crunch cost.

“The offers and discounts available in interiors shops mean that many people are in a better position to consider larger projects, such as kitchens and bathrooms, than they were a year or two ago,†says Rob Whitaker, head of Fired Earth.

Mark Williams has been taking full advantage of these offers to furnish the barn he is converting with his wife, Deborah, on the outskirts of village in rural Warwickshire.

Williams, 42, who runs Specialised Woodworking, a furniture company, bought the property at an auction four years ago for £361,000. “I’ve bought top-quality goods at good discounts, some of them quite dramatic,†he says. The couple have so far spent £30,000 on the cosmetic renovations, including sourcing materials from factory clearance sales. Williams even visited a quarry direct for his stone floors.

“It’s made the money go a lot further. I found a lavatory for £100, down from £700. My plasterer also dropped his daily rate from £220 to £150 �" I didn’t even have to haggle.â€

Is it too late to cash in on the downturn? Not necessarily. Some agents are predicting a second drop in prices �" a so-called “W-shaped recovery†�" as the inevitable increase in interest rates hits the housing market. This means the opportunity to take the risk and make money on a second downturn may well present itself again. :blink::blink::blink::blink::blink:

I can't begin to tell you how sick I am of my licence fee being used by the BBC to ramp the property market.

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable

Excellent, now that the money shortage is truly over, we can all feel confident of the future and dive in to the housing market.

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Guest The Relaxation Suite

The average British house is still 40% over-valued. The Times can publish what it likes, and the BBC can broadcast what it likes but it cannot change this fact.

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Is it too late to cash in on the downturn? Not necessarily. Some agents are predicting a second drop in prices — a so-called “W-shaped recovery†— as the inevitable increase in interest rates hits the housing market. This means the opportunity to take the risk and make money on a second downturn may well present itself again. :blink::blink::blink::blink::blink:

So all the people who were savvy enough to take a risk and make money on the first downturn, all the people celebrated in the article, will be toast...

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I'm heartily sick, of a media that rights for a rich elite, and politicians that only govern for a rich elite.

No wonder people are turning to blogs and forums for their information.

After the election there will be big tax rises. Guess what? Higher income tax will be presented as essential applied to low/mid income earners yet will somehow "deter enterprise" if applied to the rich.

Rope and plenty of lamposts required.

Edited by HostPaul TAFKA Rover2000

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I can't begin to tell you how sick I am of my licence fee being used by the BBC to ramp the property market.

Totally agree, but isn't this the Times ?

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This kind of short termism / let's turn a fast buck and to hell with the consequences thinking is what led to ......

1 in 33 people in work estimated to become unemployed in 2009

£58,360 average household debt

£181m amount of interest paid in the UK daily

every 10 minutes a property is repossessed

3,310 people made redundant every day

1 person every 4.35 minutes declared bankrupt or insolvent

£106m interest daily amount the Government pays of our national debt

Public borrowing rising to £175bn this year.

National debt to reach almost £1.4 trillion in 2013-14, equal to almost 80pc of the economy.

Government to issue £220bn of bonds this year to plug spending gap

Government to borrow £703 billion to finance the UK economy

And these figures were in April 2009 they have probably gone up since then

SO THANK HEAVENS SOMEONE IS MAKING MONEY OUT OF A SITUATION THAT IT IS GOING TO TAKE THE UK TAX PAYER UNTIL AT LEAST 2032 TO PAY BACK!!

I despair to be honest , how could ANYONE write an article like this when the consequences of such thinking is what got us all in this mess in the first place?

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The mainstream press are a pretty solid contrarian indicator. I think we've seen enough evidence of this from

  • the 'What the papers said' section of HPC;
  • the blind optimism 2006-2007 (cue HPC)
  • the hysterical bearishness late 2008/early 2009 (cue 'recovery')

and now we seem to be back to unreal optimism again. (cue.......)

The clouds gather......

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The average British house is still 40% over-valued. The Times can publish what it likes, and the BBC can broadcast what it likes but it cannot change this fact.

Yet how many times have I read recently that if property fell 40 - 50% people would be buying up dozens of properties whilst they are so cheap!!

I just can't believe this has become mainstream thinking in such a short time.

It was only a decade ago that a property valued at £250000 was seen as being worth "a quarter of a million", and people thought they could retire if they won the Readers Digest Competition £250000, now you are luckly to be able to buy a 2 bed terrrace for the same.

Has this surge in wealth and property prices benefited anyone even those who seemingly benefited from it?

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So four or five examples of people doing well against countless hundreds and thousands drowning in a sea of debt and mortgage arrears. What a superficial piece of writing. Aimed at the already rich and to hell with the ordinary worker.

730k for a four bedder?

With the economy in freefall they are going to be ruined.

And this douchebag works in financial services-safe job yeah?

They should have rented.

As a piece of analysis, it contains only one-offs, no hard general economic data or contextual analysis of any significance.

Absolute and total sh*te.

Nick

Edited by SurgeonGeneral

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They also sold their two-bedroom flat in the Isle of Dogs for £430,000, having paid £350,000 for it in 2006.

So the purchased at the peak of the market and didnt take a lose.

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Guest The Relaxation Suite
Has this surge in wealth and property prices benefited anyone even those who seemingly benefited from it?

Excessively high land prices are to blame for most of our society's problems.

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The establishment are going to pay very dearly for their ongoing treason.

I'm saying we will witness a French style revolution, but in true British fashion it will be a long slow redistribution of power and wealth.

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July 26, 2009

How to cash in on the credit crunch

The past two years of financial turmoil haven’t been disastrous for everyone - some investors have come out on top

http://property.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life...icle6726840.ece

The dramatic nature of the deterioration in the housing market is further reflected in the fact that monthly transactions in the UK fell from 160,000 per month in August 2007 to only 41,000 in January this year.

What are they now?

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So the purchased at the peak of the market and didnt take a lose.

These people just don't exist. These articles are known as "flogs." Persona's created to hang a story on. Pure works of fiction. More realism in "Wind in the Willows"

Just being trying to see if Robert O’Brien "forty something" IT consultant and "Guy and Beatrice Emerson" have any kind of profile on the social networking sites or on Google. Surely if they exist they must have some kind of public profile to come to the attention to the Times? Or do they just write about people they know.

Times newspapers, you are bunch of effing liars.

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The lucky ones include investors who monitored the market with a hawkish eye and snapped up repossession and auction properties when they felt prices were close to or had reached the bottom

FAIL. Immediate fail, do not pass go.

Lets declare the winners before the game is over, shall we? What pathetic excuse for journalism is this?

Hate to state the obvious, but buying any property in the hope of this being the bottom is gambling to say the least. In a few years time we'll see if they made the right gamble or not.

But the prevailing signs are..... FAILED.

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"winners" :lol:

"accidental winners" even more :lol:

Just perhaps they ought to focus on some of the f*ckers who can't move cos they're stuck in negative equity?

The gloating is a bit much really when there are so many people out there having a tough time.

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"winners" :lol:

"accidental winners" even more :lol:

Just perhaps they ought to focus on some of the f*ckers who can't move cos they're stuck in negative equity?

The gloating is a bit much really when there are so many people out there having a tough time.

This journalism is aimed to generate fear that people are missing the boat again, unfortunately (or fortunately) their psychological understanding is as weak as their financial journalism.

Pieces like this is more likely to have a negative impact on market sentiment rather than buoying it up. As a poster said above calling the winners before the end of the game does not sit well with people, even the sheeple.

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This journalism is aimed to generate fear that people are missing the boat again, unfortunately (or fortunately) their psychological understanding is as weak as their financial journalism.

Pieces like this is more likely to have a negative impact on market sentiment rather than buoying it up. As a poster said above calling the winners before the end of the game does not sit well with people, even the sheeple.

it's just another fluff piece. plenty of it about on a sunday.

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