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Can I Use My Wood Fire?

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Hi, I've just moved into a new house in London zone 5 (BR postcode) and it has a lovely working fireplace. Obviously I don't need it now, but am I allowed to use this in the winter? I know London has some kind of clean air rules but i'm not sure which areas they cover.

Can anyone enlighten me?

Some suggestions on which wood to use would also be grand :)

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Hi, I've just moved into a new house in London zone 5 (BR postcode) and it has a lovely working fireplace. Obviously I don't need it now, but am I allowed to use this in the winter? I know London has some kind of clean air rules but i'm not sure which areas they cover.

Can anyone enlighten me?

Some suggestions on which wood to use would also be grand :)

You'll probably in a "smoke control area" and will need to fit an approved cleanburning stove to burn wood and coal.

Check with your local authority.

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untreated wood out of skips burns pretty clean if cut with the authorised fuel, and is free to boot. Me & all my friends did this in out victorian terraces in a smoke control area and I never heard of anyone getting any hassle from anyone.

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Just chuck a log or two on the fire. Who on earth is going to catch you???

The council man looking for who's chimney the smoke is eminating from?

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You can burn any wood on a fire.

However, if you do burn young sappy wood and worse, resinous softwood such as pine, you will ruin the fireclay lining of your chimney: and cost yourself thousands in repairs. Mainly since the combustion process creates vast amounts of creosote and other stuff, ruinous to old chimneys.

Best to install a proper wood burning stove (They are not that expensive of you shop around: and they are much more efficient) and more critically, a flexible Stainless Steel Flue liner.

Best wood for heat value/weight is Hornbeam. Pretty rare though here.

Best choice is aged (Minimum two years) fruit wood.

Perhaps you would be better off having the chimney properly swept and then burning smokeless coal-based fuel.

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hi

how much would it cost to install a flexible stainless steel flue liner?

I have looked at wood burning stoves and you seem to be able to buy decent wood burning stoves for around 500 pounds. i want to know how much more do i need to spend to get it working

i already have a fireplace hearth in my house.

thanks

You can burn any wood on a fire.

However, if you do burn young sappy wood and worse, resinous softwood such as pine, you will ruin the fireclay lining of your chimney: and cost yourself thousands in repairs. Mainly since the combustion process creates vast amounts of creosote and other stuff, ruinous to old chimneys.

Best to install a proper wood burning stove (They are not that expensive of you shop around: and they are much more efficient) and more critically, a flexible Stainless Steel Flue liner.

Best wood for heat value/weight is Hornbeam. Pretty rare though here.

Best choice is aged (Minimum two years) fruit wood.

Perhaps you would be better off having the chimney properly swept and then burning smokeless coal-based fuel.

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hi

how much would it cost to install a flexible stainless steel flue liner?

I have looked at wood burning stoves and you seem to be able to buy decent wood burning stoves for around 500 pounds. i want to know how much more do i need to spend to get it working

i already have a fireplace hearth in my house.

thanks

Somewhere between £750-1250 depending on how long your chimney is and how much rigid pipe you need to connect the stove to the line in the chimney.

I'm getting quite tempted to start taking gash wood out of other people's skips to burn in our stove - is this legal (theft?) ?

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I rent the house so i'm not going to install any new stoves etc...

I'll just use those smokeless wood logs you can buy at the petrol station. I'm not going to use it often as there is central heating, I just might want to have it burning occasionally to brighten up a cold winter's evening.

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hi

how much would it cost to install a flexible stainless steel flue liner?

It is not difficult to do this yourself.

Simply, you pull the liner up from the firplace and fix it at the top with a straddling clamp. Some say pull the flexible pipe downwards: horses for courses!

Be sure to use Twin Wall tube though: this has insulation wrapped around the inner tube and is protected by the outer tube.

If you don't use Twin Wall Insulated Tube, then you might have to "Backfill" the whole cavity with granular insulation such as Vermiculite.

For effective combustion, the temp of the liner must be maintained: if not the upper levels of the liner cool the gas and result in condensation of corrosive nasties. Additionally, if the top levels are too cold then the draught suffers and the stove or fire will not "Draw" sufficient fresh air (And thus Oxygen) in for proper combustion.

Cost of flexible liner depends on diameter: Anywere from £18/M +VAT to £ 200/ 10 M (VAT Incl).

I have a chum who does runs a chimney and stove company and he advised me, 'cos I have to line my chimney in France.

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Somewhere between £750-1250 depending on how long your chimney is and how much rigid pipe you need to connect the stove to the line in the chimney.

I'm getting quite tempted to start taking gash wood out of other people's skips to burn in our stove - is this legal (theft?) ?

It's theft. Taking stuff is only legal if it's been genuinely abandoned and you have good reason to believe that it's been abandoned. Alternatively, you had an honest belief at the time that the person putting it in the skip intended that you be allowed to take it.

Just ask them if you can take it as most people usually say yes.

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isnt it quite difficult to get climb on the roof and fix the liner at the top. i suppose my best bet would be to hire someone to do it. how viable is wood burning or rather what is the payback time when you install this stove. typically the payback for solar hot water heating is given as 5 to 6 year optimistically. so what would be a typical figure fro a say a 6 kW output stove. i love the idea of having a stove but the costs are making me think twice

thanks for you input. it is very helpful

It is not difficult to do this yourself.

Simply, you pull the liner up from the firplace and fix it at the top with a straddling clamp. Some say pull the flexible pipe downwards: horses for courses!

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The council man looking for who's chimney the smoke is eminating from?

I wonder how much checking is done these days?

I mean, back in the days when the rules on preventing smog came in, they were really needed because almost everyone was burning coal for heating.

Now relatively few people have open fires, which makes me suspect that they probably don't need to have people checking chimneys.

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isnt it quite difficult to get climb on the roof and fix the liner at the top. i suppose my best bet would be to hire someone to do it. how viable is wood burning or rather what is the payback time when you install this stove. typically the payback for solar hot water heating is given as 5 to 6 year optimistically. so what would be a typical figure fro a say a 6 kW output stove. i love the idea of having a stove but the costs are making me think twice

thanks for you input. it is very helpful

The ultimate way to heat with wood is to use what is called a Wood Gasification System (Or Boiler).

These bake the wood and the gasses and vapours released are then burnt in a secondary chamber, made from ceramic materials able to resist super-hot burning temps and air is forced into this chamber by a high pressure fan.

The ultimate way to extract heat energy from burning wood.

The boiler heats water to nearly boiling: this is stored in what is called a Thermal Store (Or Heat Store) at 90 deg C.

A Heat Exchanger circulates lower temp water through the rads and hot water storage tank.

A three hour burn provides sufficient latent heat in the Thermal Store to heat the house for 24 hours!

And supplies domestic hot water too.

Thge most advanced Gasification Boilers are fully automatic: the burn can be started (Provided the fuel hopper is stocked) remotely by a telephone call!

I am going to fit this system in France: the main benefit being France has excellent supplies of renewable wood.

As an example, coppiced willow can be ready to cut for burning in three or four years.

Lots about it here: http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q...mp;aq=f&oq=

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I wonder how much checking is done these days?

I mean, back in the days when the rules on preventing smog came in, they were really needed because almost everyone was burning coal for heating.

Now relatively few people have open fires, which makes me suspect that they probably don't need to have people checking chimneys.

Enforced by Environmental Health Departments - Clean Air Acts of 1956 & 1969

Clean Air Act 1993 applies to commercial premises

However as most LA EHO's have been replaced now by Community diversity and cohesion Officers the chances of a Sani Man scanning your chimney with his ringelmann is somewhat diminished.

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The ultimate way to heat with wood is to use what is called a Wood Gasification System (Or Boiler).

There was a thread on here about North Korea a few weeks back. There were pictures posted of North Korean trucks (actually, I think they were Russian) that were apparently fulled by wood, but which obviously weren't stem powered.

Is this a similar sort of thing?

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Enforced by Environmental Health Departments - Clean Air Acts of 1956 & 1969

Clean Air Act 1993 applies to commercial premises

However as most LA EHO's have been replaced now by Community diversity and cohesion Officers the chances of a Sani Man scanning your chimney with his ringelmann is somewhat diminished.

I'd be more concerned about some neighbour with nothing better to do with their time than to report me to the council.

Like I said, I won't be using it often, it would just be nice occasionally, so i'll just buy those smokeless log-type things even if they are quite expensive.

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Hi, we heat our house with wood and coal and don't have any other source of heat so I figure we can help you some! The most important thing about heating with wood is to have dry wood. It must have been drying for at least a year under cover. Wet wood will give off creosote which is a gas that condenses as a liquid inside your chimney. Not only is it corrosive it is flammable and will cause chimney fires. The air-tight type stove is best which means that the air input is controlled rather than the chimney flue outlet but there must be a control somewhere or the fire will burn too hot and too fast. The stove must be made of cast iron or stainless steel. Mild steel won't do but some stoves are made of mild steel with fire brick liners. These types are very inefficient and you are really heating the great outdoors. The chimney should have as much single wall stove pipe as you can manage because a lot of the heat comes off the chimney. Building regulations will probably limit this but take it to the maximum. All wood will do the job as long as it is dry but soft wood burns hot and fast while hard wood burns slower. Fruit wood is good. We only burn coal when the temperature drops below -10. I can't imagine you needing it in UK. If you can organise to feed outside air instead of inside air to the stove you will notice a major heat difference. My guess would be that a cord of hard wood would heat your house totally for a winter and I doubt the inside temperature would drop below 30. Any questions . . I'm your expert. We have heated the house this way for thirty years! If you work at it you will do it for free. One more thing: locate the stove as centrally as you can. Heat goes up very well but won't move sideways worth a damn. Fans are helpful.

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There was a thread on here about North Korea a few weeks back. There were pictures posted of North Korean trucks (actually, I think they were Russian) that were apparently fulled by wood, but which obviously weren't stem powered.

Is this a similar sort of thing?

Yes it is.

Used in France during WWII.

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hi

how much would it cost to install a flexible stainless steel flue liner?

I have looked at wood burning stoves and you seem to be able to buy decent wood burning stoves for around 500 pounds. i want to know how much more do i need to spend to get it working

i already have a fireplace hearth in my house.

thanks

What people forget about useing a fire or stove for heating is that unless you have and underfloor draught fitted you end up with toasted shins and a frozen rump.

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There was a thread on here about North Korea a few weeks back. There were pictures posted of North Korean trucks (actually, I think they were Russian) that were apparently fulled by wood, but which obviously weren't stem powered.

Is this a similar sort of thing?

During WW2 some busses were powered by gas generated in a towed trailer. If I remember the priduction involved passing steam through glowing coke to produce a mixture of CO and H2. I bet H&S would love the CO these days!

PS when I say remember I mean remember reading about it in my school days which were after WW2.

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