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Darkman

"rents Can Never Be Negotiated Down, But Landlords Can Raise The Rent"

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So here it is.... I originally knocked the advertised rent down a little, and have paid that amount for a year. Noticing rents going down recently I emailed my agent suggested we re-negotiate the next 6 month contract for a lower amount. I got politely mailed back saying "Rents can never be negotiated down, but landlords can raise the rent".

This is a new one on me, but please educate me on it? Why can new rent contracts not be lowered? Surely a rental contract is like any other, and any terms can be subject to change provided both parties agree? :rolleyes:

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So here it is.... I originally knocked the advertised rent down a little, and have paid that amount for a year. Noticing rents going down recently I emailed my agent suggested we re-negotiate the next 6 month contract for a lower amount. I got politely mailed back saying "Rents can never be negotiated down, but landlords can raise the rent".

This is a new one on me, but please educate me on it? Why can new rent contracts not be lowered? Surely a rental contract is like any other, and any terms can be subject to change provided both parties agree? :rolleyes:

Yep. This is EA BS. You are perfectly entitled to (try to) negotiate the rent downwards.

tim

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Yep. This is EA BS. You are perfectly entitled to (try to) negotiate the rent downwards.

tim

+1

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Just tell the EA that you understand that rents 'cannot be negotiated down', but ask them to please tell your landlord that you've seen similar places much cheaper and you're thinking of not renewing and moving somewhere else.

They're trying to do a 'computer says no' but don't believe a word of it. Rents are falling precipitously right now.

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Right, so it's as I thought, they're banking on me being a novice idiot.

Yes they are! The only time rents are prevented from going down is on the majority of commercial rents on leases which have rent reviews normally every 5 years. On houses especially on AST's they were taking the pi$$ out of you, very blatantly may I add.

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They can be negotiated down as others have said. Although you need to give the impression that you are prepared to leave if the rent is not reduced as you can live elsewhere cheaper. We got our rent reduced when we renewed this way.

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It's nonsense.

There might be a clause in the AST that includes "The Rent will not be reduced below the figure in <other clause number> at any time"

But that still doesn't mean "rents can never be negotiated down."

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When the lease on our former house came up for renewal, the letting agent said something about the rent may be realigned with current market rates. I responded enthusiastically pointing out that we were paying more than other similar houses in the area and I would welcome a drop in price to realign us with the current market. Funnily enough when the contract came through it was for original amount and not a raise as the letting agent was euphemistically getting at.

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Typical evil and/or airheaded response from the EA. Call them on their BS, and be prepared to move if you don't get your way. I would appraoch the landlord directly as well, to make sure he/she knows what is going on.

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It's rubbish. Once the contract is over anything is possible. Whether it's likely or not, and whether it's worth it to you is another thing. Just because rents have fallen in your area doesn't mean it's a done deal. Remember that voids cost them, but moving will cost you, not least in time and effort.

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I don't see why people get so concerned at clauses in rental contracts. It's obvious that once a contract is over, it's over and the terms can renegotiated in any way either party sees fit.

We've got that clause in our contract, I've paid it absolutely no mind.

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I just got a 10% reduction on our one-bedroom flat with barely a whimper from the LL and EA. Posh bit of W9.

They're petrified of voids and redundancies right now, so if you've been a reliable tenant it's time to start screwing that rent down.

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Here's a classic!

In an addendum the rental agreement for the place I am about to rent entitled 'SPECIAL TENANCY CONDITIONS' it states that:

[...]

3. IT IS AGREED that subject to the availability of the property [...] THE TENANT has the option to renew the tenancy agreement under the same terms and conditions [...] WITH THE EXCEPTION that the monthly rental shall be increased in line with RPI (not less than 4% or more than 8%).

[... (CAPITAL LETTERS theirs)]

How double-speak is this??!??! Aside from the obvious rubbishness of RPI being 'planned' as between 4 and 8% ... how does this work? Is this 'right to renewal' somehow a part of the opening agreement?

Personally, I am not caring much that such gobble-de-gook is in place (ignoring it because we might not rent next year ... we might buy because we want to buy the home we live in).

Am I reading this right that: I do not expect the rent next year being greater than 108% of this year's. And that it might be (in terms of LL expectations) as little as 104% ... either way: if rents continue to drop off over the next 12 months (we can live in hope ... heh?) then I already know where the LL is going to start negotiating from?

How standard is such a 'SPECIAL TENANCY CONDITION' addendum and/or such clauses?

Thoughts, anyone?

Aidanapword

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Here's a classic!

In an addendum the rental agreement for the place I am about to rent entitled 'SPECIAL TENANCY CONDITIONS' it states that:

[...]

3. IT IS AGREED that subject to the availability of the property [...] THE TENANT has the option to renew the tenancy agreement under the same terms and conditions [...] WITH THE EXCEPTION that the monthly rental shall be increased in line with RPI (not less than 4% or more than 8%).

[... (CAPITAL LETTERS theirs)]

How double-speak is this??!??! Aside from the obvious rubbishness of RPI being 'planned' as between 4 and 8% ... how does this work? Is this 'right to renewal' somehow a part of the opening agreement?

Personally, I am not caring much that such gobble-de-gook is in place (ignoring it because we might not rent next year ... we might buy because we want to buy the home we live in).

Am I reading this right that: I do not expect the rent next year being greater than 108% of this year's. And that it might be (in terms of LL expectations) as little as 104% ... either way: if rents continue to drop off over the next 12 months (we can live in hope ... heh?) then I already know where the LL is going to start negotiating from?

How standard is such a 'SPECIAL TENANCY CONDITION' addendum and/or such clauses?

Thoughts, anyone?

Aidanapword

Sounds like ******.

If you want to carry on living there come the end of agreement you simply refuse to re-new and get a new contract drawn up.

Much the same as I do with my car insurance. They give me a renewal, I cancel and then go through the same company's site for a new quote. It's always lower than the renewal they offer.

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