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Jason

A New Build/off Plan Detached House

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Hi All,

I've found a house I really like, and quite a good price. It's a new-build detached house, and really like the location and layout of the house. If the house was built perfectly, I would be over the moon - it's quite a reasonable plot of land, and the rooms are of a reasonable size with the garden being private (not over looked). For my budget I can't find a similar house that is detached with a garage, and within walking distance of town.

However, I have big reservations about the build (if it's done right) and whether I could get finance when complete. So I've requested the completion to be within the mortgage offer term (6months) and for a retention can be held back. If not, I won't go ahead with the purchase.

Has anyone else bought brand new? Should I just forget about it? I've also said if the mortgage co down-value it they must come down in price not to affect the Lend To Value. The builder is ....

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Hi All,

I've found a house I really like, and quite a good price. It's a new-build detached house, and really like the location and layout of the house. If the house was built perfectly, I would be over the moon - it's quite a reasonable plot of land, and the rooms are of a reasonable size with the garden being private (not over looked). For my budget I can't find a similar house that is detached with a garage, and within walking distance of town.

However, I have big reservations about the build (if it's done right) and whether I could get finance when complete. So I've requested the completion to be within the mortgage offer term (6months) and for a retention can be held back. If not, I won't go ahead with the purchase.

Has anyone else bought brand new? Should I just forget about it? I've also said if the mortgage co down-value it they must come down in price not to affect the Lend To Value. The builder is ....

My view is that I won't buy something that doesn't actually exist yet. Maybe I'm a bit old-fashioned that way.

Just out of interest have you seen ITVs "New Homes From Hell" ?

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Take a look at this lot. Many unhappy Persimmon customers out there.

http://forum.snagging.org/persimmon-homes/

I would be very wary buying a new build, especially now. The builders are fighting for their commercial lives and your problems, should they occur, are unlikely to be top of their priority list. They are also struggling to cut costs and this may have an impact on quality.

Never buy anything off plan. I am used to looking at plans and I know how hard it can be to clearly visualise the finished building. Particularly if the waters are muddied by some nice artwork in the way of an 'architects impression'.

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Hi All,

I've found a house I really like, and quite a good price. It's a new-build detached house, and really like the location and layout of the house. If the house was built perfectly, I would be over the moon - it's quite a reasonable plot of land, and the rooms are of a reasonable size with the garden being private (not over looked). For my budget I can't find a similar house that is detached with a garage, and within walking distance of town.

However, I have big reservations about the build (if it's done right) and whether I could get finance when complete. So I've requested the completion to be within the mortgage offer term (6months) and for a retention can be held back. If not, I won't go ahead with the purchase.

Has anyone else bought brand new? Should I just forget about it? I've also said if the mortgage co down-value it they must come down in price not to affect the Lend To Value. The builder is ....

Don't see the appeal of new builds myself, but whatever floats your boat :lol:

Two things - Can you wait? Longer you delay, the more you'll save IMO. Also, check who owns all the surrounding land, and if there are any planning permission applications for development in the area. Nothing worse than a developer spoiling your view by building low cost 'social housing'!

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Bought Nearly New/Second Owner, very happy with a modern house...

Agreed, some can be lovely: My parents have a 'new' house they bought off-plan a few years back: Thing is, it was one of about 4, from a well-known, well respected local builder, and the builder had already built the first 2.

It's the unknowns you need to worry about, including the unknowns introduced by any builder who doesnt give a stuff for their local reputation.

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We've been renting a Persimmon built home for last 2 years. We were first people to live there. Hence we have had hassle of talking to agent to contact builders to put right all the snagging.

To be fair, the agents have been pretty good, but getting the work done means a lot of time off work and waiting in.

A little problem like a few cracks in the wall meant 1 day off for a plasterer, 1 day for a chippy then another day for the painter. When the painter got to us he had the wrong colour paint!!!!! FFS!!!

Thats 4 days off for 1 small problem. We've had other niggly probs as well.

Most ridiculous one was curtain pole. I think the landlord must have plumped for some soft furnishings as part of the deal to buy the house - a few other houses have the same curtains as us.

They are heavy curtains. One day the pole fell out of the wall - luckily hitting no-one. They had used normal rawl plugs for use in brick walls to hang the curtain poles in a plasterboard wall and then fitted heavy suede curtains!!!!!

I spotted so many botches when we moved in i was sickened to think how much my poor hardworking LL had paid for such miserable quality workmanship.

I wouldnt buy a new house anyway, but if one day I was tempted, our recent experience would definitely put us off buying from Persimmon.

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What draws me to a new build is how warm, and low maintenance they are. I currently live in a Victorian house (rent), and I could easily throw £50k at it to modernise it, it's very very cold in winter - but I've negoiated the elec+gas bills into my rent so the heating is on all day when it's cold. Also, this place doesn't have a garage+drive which I really want.

I could just about afford a modernised victorian, but still they are expensive to heat and run. Ideally, I want the EPC to be in the green on the HIP. Also, these victorian houses don't have drive's which is a must for me. The rooms may be small compared to older houses, but the one I like is a good size with three double beds.

I have seen a complete one, and was very impressed although it didn't have carpets or anything in. Also, I have had a good look around and can see some unfinished snags, hence why I want a retainer of 5% or so.

No others can be built, as it's on old hospital land and next to a [good - so I'm told] school.

The stage I'm at is that I've had an offere accepted, but currently revising it downwards as I know the mortgage company will down-value it.

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Hi All,

I've found a house I really like, and quite a good price. It's a new-build detached house, and really like the location and layout of the house. If the house was built perfectly, I would be over the moon - it's quite a reasonable plot of land, and the rooms are of a reasonable size with the garden being private (not over looked). For my budget I can't find a similar house that is detached with a garage, and within walking distance of town.

However, I have big reservations about the build (if it's done right) and whether I could get finance when complete. So I've requested the completion to be within the mortgage offer term (6months) and for a retention can be held back. If not, I won't go ahead with the purchase.

Has anyone else bought brand new? Should I just forget about it? I've also said if the mortgage co down-value it they must come down in price not to affect the Lend To Value. The builder is ....

Have you seriously lost leave of your senses Jason, or has Hamish/Sibley hacked your HPC account?

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Hi All,

I've found a house I really like, and quite a good price. It's a new-build detached house, and really like the location and layout of the house. If the house was built perfectly, I would be over the moon - it's quite a reasonable plot of land, and the rooms are of a reasonable size with the garden being private (not over looked). For my budget I can't find a similar house that is detached with a garage, and within walking distance of town.

However, I have big reservations about the build (if it's done right) and whether I could get finance when complete. So I've requested the completion to be within the mortgage offer term (6months) and for a retention can be held back. If not, I won't go ahead with the purchase.

Has anyone else bought brand new? Should I just forget about it? I've also said if the mortgage co down-value it they must come down in price not to affect the Lend To Value. The builder is ....

I bought a victorian terraced house half way through being refurbished by a reputable developer in Walthamstow 11 years ago.

As soon as we exchanged, i got the drabbest kitchen he'd ever installed and the bathroom leaked through the kitchen roof on the first day. Id seen plenty other examples of his work and what i ended up with, although still perfectly ok, was not up to the standard of his other projects. It was obvious that hed moved on once the ink was dry on my contract. Be careful.

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Hi All,

I've found a house I really like, and quite a good price. It's a new-build detached house, and really like the location and layout of the house. If the house was built perfectly, I would be over the moon - it's quite a reasonable plot of land, and the rooms are of a reasonable size with the garden being private (not over looked). For my budget I can't find a similar house that is detached with a garage, and within walking distance of town.

However, I have big reservations about the build (if it's done right) and whether I could get finance when complete. So I've requested the completion to be within the mortgage offer term (6months) and for a retention can be held back. If not, I won't go ahead with the purchase.

Has anyone else bought brand new? Should I just forget about it? I've also said if the mortgage co down-value it they must come down in price not to affect the Lend To Value. The builder is ....

:lol: Good luck.

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Hi All,

If the house was built perfectly,

That is a VERY big if!! There are FAR too many things I dislike in newbuilds to list here but even supposing it was built perfectly (highly unlikely), you would soon find things you were not happy with when compared to a seasoned house that has stood the test of a few decades and of traditional construction. The extra money would be far better spent on full structural surveys buying an older house.

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What draws me to a new build is how warm, and low maintenance they are. I currently live in a Victorian house (rent), and I could easily throw £50k at it to modernise it, it's very very cold in winter - but I've negoiated the elec+gas bills into my rent so the heating is on all day when it's cold. Also, this place doesn't have a garage+drive which I really want.

I could just about afford a modernised victorian, but still they are expensive to heat and run. Ideally, I want the EPC to be in the green on the HIP. Also, these victorian houses don't have drive's which is a must for me. The rooms may be small compared to older houses, but the one I like is a good size with three double beds.

I have seen a complete one, and was very impressed although it didn't have carpets or anything in. Also, I have had a good look around and can see some unfinished snags, hence why I want a retainer of 5% or so.

No others can be built, as it's on old hospital land and next to a [good - so I'm told] school.

The stage I'm at is that I've had an offere accepted, but currently revising it downwards as I know the mortgage company will down-value it.

I wouldn't buy anything at the moment, be it new build or Victorian. My guess is that new builds have at least another 40% to fall, probably more. Interest rates may well be on the up, but if you keep saving for the next three or four years you may only need a small mortgage, if at all. You are so close, don't blow it at the last hurdle.

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jason m8 been there done that and never ever again...barretts....need i say more...but i will.. i have heard all lending on newbuilds is now being valued at to sell prices....so you need to get the cost down big time...if any of the bedrooms are under 10x10 and most are.. run a mile because it will end up as a walk in wardrobe

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Echoing the sentiments of another respondent...

Many years ago, the wife & I looked at some new build plots, off plan prices etc. On the way up to the site we'd noticed a sign for some land nearby for sale for commercial development. When we questioned the developer (Redrow) about it, they said planning permission was restricted to 2 storey office units, 8AM-6PM business park style.

To cut a long story short, we never went for it in the end, although the houses looked decent enough, it wasn't right for us for various reasons...

Fast forward 2 years after we visited and the above mentioned business park was constructed... as an industrial estate with ruddy great distribution sheds, probably operating late into the evening if not 24/7.

The 'plus' for the poor sods who bought was that they built what must be at least a 60ft banking shielding the development from these eyesores, however looking out of your window at what appears to be a replica of a slag heap...

These houses are now going for anything between £220-300k... I can't recall the year they were built, maybe '98 onwards and selling for £90k'ish back then...

As the other poster suggests, do your research on the local area...

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I'll still ponder this for the rest of the month, as I've got it reserved until August. The area is fine, and there is nowhere else to develop. The only other worry is if 'rif raf' move in, but the social housing part is the other end of the development.

I think I'm inclined to pull out, I'm paying xxxk and could afford up to xxxk [for a house] if needs be (may be stretching it though). For that price, you get very few detached houses with a drive and garage in Portsmouth. I have tried to drag some dream houses down from 300k to 250k stamp duty, but there having none of it - despite pressure from the EA as he liked me and knew I could move quick! If I could get that 'dream house' for £250k it would be equivalent to the late 2002 price, and early 2003 (they are direct comparbles).

It's a shame, because I lost out on another house (10 years old) and some fool offered £15k more than me (I offered 185k). But this house was tiny (65 square meters floor space, excluding garage) for a three bed. The new build talked about here is 85 sqr/mtrs (excluding garage) and I could add a conservatory.

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Hi All,

I've found a house I really like, and quite a good price. It's a new-build detached house, and really like the location and layout of the house. If the house was built perfectly, I would be over the moon - it's quite a reasonable plot of land, and the rooms are of a reasonable size with the garden being private (not over looked). For my budget I can't find a similar house that is detached with a garage, and within walking distance of town.

However, I have big reservations about the build (if it's done right) and whether I could get finance when complete. So I've requested the completion to be within the mortgage offer term (6months) and for a retention can be held back. If not, I won't go ahead with the purchase.

Has anyone else bought brand new? Should I just forget about it? I've also said if the mortgage co down-value it they must come down in price not to affect the Lend To Value. The builder is Persimmon.

Just do the cricket ball test.

If the house passes it is of good quality, if it fails then walk away.

Really is that simple.

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I'll still ponder this for the rest of the month, as I've got it reserved until August. The area is fine, and there is nowhere else to develop. The only other worry is if 'rif raf' move in, but the social housing part is the other end of the development.

I think I'm inclined to pull out, I'm paying 218k and could afford up to 250k [for a house] if needs be (may be stretching it though). For that price, you get very few detached houses with a drive and garage in Portsmouth. I have tried to drag some dream houses down from 300k to 250k stamp duty, but there having none of it - despite pressure from the EA as he liked me and knew I could move quick! If I could get that 'dream house' for £250k it would be equivalent to the late 2002 price, and early 2003 (they are direct comparbles).

The social housing may be down the other end of the development at present, but if they cannot get enough buyers, the developers WILL sell to the Housing Associations as a way of offloading their properties. The new estate I live on is currently going through this at the moment - The site was originally planned to contain social housing making up 30% of the total number of properties, however a revised planning application has seen that level rise to 42%, with 20 out of 67 new homes set aside for social housing.

I am sure this is not just happening here.

Secondly, I am currently renting a Persimmon new build - approx 2.5 years old now, and one of the worst houses I have ever lived in (and I have lived in a Barratt before!) The only decent newish home I lived in was a Westbury, but that was 10 years old. If it has been built in the last 5 years, dont do it unless you can get it for half price

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What draws me to a new build is how warm, and low maintenance they are. I currently live in a Victorian house (rent), and I could easily throw £50k at it to modernise it, it's very very cold in winter - but I've negoiated the elec+gas bills into my rent so the heating is on all day when it's cold. Also, this place doesn't have a garage+drive which I really want.

I could just about afford a modernised victorian, but still they are expensive to heat and run. Ideally, I want the EPC to be in the green on the HIP. Also, these victorian houses don't have drive's which is a must for me. The rooms may be small compared to older houses, but the one I like is a good size with three double beds.

I have seen a complete one, and was very impressed although it didn't have carpets or anything in. Also, I have had a good look around and can see some unfinished snags, hence why I want a retainer of 5% or so.

No others can be built, as it's on old hospital land and next to a [good - so I'm told] school.

The stage I'm at is that I've had an offere accepted, but currently revising it downwards as I know the mortgage company will down-value it.

contaminated then ? :ph34r:

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I'll still ponder this for the rest of the month, as I've got it reserved until August. The area is fine, and there is nowhere else to develop. The only other worry is if 'rif raf' move in, but the social housing part is the other end of the development.

I think I'm inclined to pull out, I'm paying xxxk and could afford up to xxxk [for a house] if needs be (may be stretching it though). For that price, you get very few detached houses with a drive and garage in Portsmouth. I have tried to drag some dream houses down from 300k to 250k stamp duty, but there having none of it - despite pressure from the EA as he liked me and knew I could move quick! If I could get that 'dream house' for £250k it would be equivalent to the late 2002 price, and early 2003 (they are direct comparbles).

It's a shame, because I lost out on another house (10 years old) and some fool offered £15k more than me (I offered 185k). But this house was tiny (65 square meters floor space, excluding garage) for a three bed. The new build talked about here is 85 sqr/mtrs (excluding garage) and I could add a conservatory.

Glad to hear it Jason. Be patient. that dream house will get to your price bracket in time, next year would be my best guess.

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Just joined the forum to tell you about my Sharon-Fruit Home.

Don't want to slag off Persimmon and thus get their lawyers out of bed, so I'll talk about 'Sharon-Fruit Homes' instead, who definitely aren't Persimmon.

1) It's a Semi built in 2006, so been here 3 years. Bought from Sharon-Fruit Homes, not Persimmon.

2) Many contraventions of the NHBC finishs standards document (The one the says floors have to be level and walls vertical etc). Sharon-Fruit don't want to know about this and are just playing silly games over the last 3 years, as they would have to spend serious money to correct the issues.

3) Can hear the neighbours talking/ coughing next door. (You won't have this problem in your detached)

4) If I go into the loft, I can put my fingers through the gap between the gable bricks and the roof. The air flows through here during high winds, taking heat out of the building.

5) Outside land not drained, and thus floods. Again contravening the codes.

6) Interior wall that was not constructed correctly and keeps cracking after they plaster over it.

7) The whole house wobbles when the front door is closed for ours, or next door's.

8) Stairs leaning slightly to the left.

9) First floor landing slopes away from the top of the stairs, and is visually noticable. Slope is seen inside the main bathroom, enough to make you feel like you are leaning back when standing up straight.

10) 'Springy' bedroom floors. I am sat in one of them , which we use as an office. I am sat at the computer and if my other half walks in, you can feel the room sink. Neither of us is more than 11 stone.

11) Numerous 'daft' issues like door handles too stiff for a child or old person to operate, or a boiler that makes banging noises, shower pressure, heat, radiators not working, glass chipped. All these will use up your annual leave if you move into the property before the issues are fixed, unless you don't mind leaving Sharon-Fruit a key for about a year whilst they semi-sort out your issues.

12) Rain leaking from somewhere around a dormer window, found out only when I left a bog-roll leaning against the interior plastering. This water will be rotting the joists as we speak.

13) Window sills not horizontal. They try to cover this by fitting a radiator underneath at the same wonky angle.

14) Breeze coming into the house from behind the toilets.

The fundamental cause of most of the above was the flooring joists left out in the wet. NHBC say they must be covered whilst potentially exposed on the construction site, or whilst being built. If you can see any wooden frames, joists etc left out in the rain on your site, then you should run a mile, or get a discount equal to the amount of hassle you'll have.

The misaligned floors led to them misaligning the stairs, which led to the walls not meeting at right angles, or being vertical. I thought that the chap who laid the wooden flooring in the downstairs hall was an idiot until I realised that he was working with walls that were way off parallel. The floor tiling in the kitchen shows this up as well.

An example again is the downstairs loo that is two inches wider at one end, due to the stairs not meeting the partition wall at a right angle. If you try to tile the floor of a small space like this, you'll get very sad at the results, as the room is effectively a rhombus/ trapezium, rather than a rectangle.

My impression is that Sharon-Fuit are just a bunch of accountants with a smiley-smiley customer services/PR machine, who hire contract semi-professional labourers on a job/cost basis.

Assuming they aren't professional builders, you should consider one of the following options:

A) Get a huge discount off the advertised price

B) Have a chunk of money set aside that is paid to Sharon-Fruit once all the 'snags' (faults) are rectified, or is paid to you if say 3-months expire after completion and no fix.

C) Keep your money and buy a repo.

D) Build your own.

If you do decide to go with them, don't use the 'Recommended Solicitors'. Sharon-Fruit's and theirs won't colude, but they are chosen because they are weak and let you get stitched up like a kipper. Best option is to have a member of the family or close friend do the the conveyancing if you can.

If you contact me directly, I can show you photos of all of the above, and more besides.

There have been many threads on HPC about why Britain is 'crap'. Having to drag major-league builders into providing 21st century quality is illustrative of how far behind we are.

H

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Just joined the forum to tell you about my Sharon-Fruit Home.

Don't want to slag off Persimmon and thus get their lawyers out of bed, so I'll talk about 'Sharon-Fruit Homes' instead, who definitely aren't Persimmon.

My impression is that Sharon-Fuit are just a bunch of accountants with a smiley-smiley customer services/PR machine, who hire contract semi-professional labourers on a job/cost basis.

Assuming they aren't professional builders, you should consider one of the following options:

A) Get a huge discount off the advertised price

B) Have a chunk of money set aside that is paid to Sharon-Fruit once all the 'snags' (faults) are rectified, or is paid to you if say 3-months expire after completion and no fix.

C) Keep your money and buy a repo.

D) Build your own.

There have been many threads on HPC about why Britain is 'crap'. Having to drag major-league builders into providing 21st century quality is illustrative of how far behind we are.

H

Awesome first post. Do stay around.

Bump

Edited by General Melchett

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Just joined the forum to tell you about my Sharon-Fruit Home.

Don't want to slag off Persimmon and thus get their lawyers out of bed, so I'll talk about 'Sharon-Fruit Homes' instead, who definitely aren't Persimmon.

...

There have been many threads on HPC about why Britain is 'crap'. Having to drag major-league builders into providing 21st century quality is illustrative of how far behind we are.

H

Great post.

My dads a brickie and reckons that the build cost, including labour of most newbuilds is about £40,000.00. It's not a lot and it shows. The land the house sits on is usually the most expensive part of any build.

Never met a reliable builder yet and that includes my dad.

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