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Hip to be bear

Restaurants And Uk Tourism

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THis is supposed to be a great season for British tourism with the weak pound bringing international visitors here as well as keeping the Brits at home.

Are you seeing busy pubs and restaurants?

Are you struggling to get accomodation for weekend breaks?

Are the metropolitan centres struggling?

Tell us what is going on around the country.......

We have a restaurant in Weymouth in Dorset. After a very tough winter we have had record months in April, May and June. July is of to a flyer too. The weather has helped obviously, but in general we are seeing Brits and foreigners coming in their droves and spending when they get here.

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Yes Hip, up here on the North Norfolk coast the hikers, birders and pensioners are all over us like a cheap suit! I am in the process of applying for a taxi badge and have bought a large MPV so I can drive them around to supplement the sheer utter and dismal collapse in Caribbean hols bookings*.

Also, we are popping away to the south to see family in mid-august and were surprised to be able to book space in the local dog kennels with ease - they said that this is their quietest summer. (Kennels mainly rely on folks going overseas of course).

* note that you will do even better from Nov 2009 due to the effects of the insane and monstrous increase in APD (air ticket tax) which will be the final nail in the coffin for the UK's outbound tourism industry. More Brits will come our way in 2010, but the downside of APD increases is that fewer foreigners will come to the UK as their tickets will rise too and good old Gordie will have ruined the competitive advantage of the collapsed pound - can't he get anything right?

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Went to the outdoor theatre last night and was busy. Lots of Champagne corks popping throughout the evening.

Trying to find accommodation for a (UK) week in August and cant.

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I went to cinema on wednesday its was RAMMED nothing major out either... Orange Wednesdays to thank 2 4 1

I go for a carvery... lovely pub nearby.... 6 days a week only 3.50 BARGAIN cheaper than cooking at home and the beer is good value too, only 2.20 per pint.

I went out for a balti last night... 4 course meal with coffee only 6.95... BARGAIN and it was full.

I see the people GETTING people in the door are making the money, while the others pay staff to mill around doing nothing.

You have to adjust your business to accomodate

We have a local pub closing at 9 now as its not financially viable to open past this time... what with all the late licencing it makes no difference... you have to adapt your business to cope when things are tight!

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THis is supposed to be a great season for British tourism with the weak pound bringing international visitors here as well as keeping the Brits at home.

Are you seeing busy pubs and restaurants?

Are you struggling to get accomodation for weekend breaks?

Are the metropolitan centres struggling?

Tell us what is going on around the country.......

We have a restaurant in Weymouth in Dorset. After a very tough winter we have had record months in April, May and June. July is of to a flyer too. The weather has helped obviously, but in general we are seeing Brits and foreigners coming in their droves and spending when they get here.

Cornwall is always busy. Never ending droves of people from all walks of life. However, they don't appear to be spending in pubs or restaurants much. Most of the visitors are too healthy - i.e. cyclists, walkers, campers. They come into our gastro local and order a glass of bottled water. Not much profit here.

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Bath's ramping up for the summer season in a big way - the weakness of the pound seems to have brought the American and Japanese tourists back in droves. Tourist restaurants and pubs seem permanently rammed but those that rely on locals for business seem to be struggling.

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Cornwall is always busy. Never ending droves of people from all walks of life. However, they don't appear to be spending in pubs or restaurants much. Most of the visitors are too healthy - i.e. cyclists, walkers, campers. They come into our gastro local and order a glass of bottled water. Not much profit here.

Have to confess that we don't drink much alcohol with a meal when we're on holiday, just because we have the kids in tow.

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Bath's ramping up for the summer season in a big way - the weakness of the pound seems to have brought the American and Japanese tourists back in droves. Tourist restaurants and pubs seem permanently rammed but those that rely on locals for business seem to be struggling.

Our local radio station is doing a promotion - £50 vouchers for £25, different restaurant each week (60 vouchers available).

Only the local Frankie and Benny's has 'sold out' one of the restaurants hasn't even managed to shift 20 vouchers.

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CB any chance of a broader update on the Windie.how bad is it out there?

Hi Reapy

Well almost every day a story hits the web along these lines (although figures of -25% for Grenada seem conservative, I understand that the declines are much larger in other islands). When reading this report, keep in mind these crucial words: no welfare state; corrupt and useless police. Then you can imagine what will happen:

Economic free fall shakes Caribbean

With the United States in the midst of recession, the tourist-dependent Caribbean searches for ways to cushion the blow during a four-day summit.

People walk and play on a beach in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Expensive jet fuel and a soft American economy are threatening to sink Caribbean tourism as airline ticket prices soar and flights are sharply reduced, choking the flow of the travelers that the region depends upon BRENNAN LINSLEY/AP PHOTO

Photo BY JACQUELINE CHARLES

jcharles@MiamiHerald.com

Grenada Prime Minister Tillman Thomas stood before a roomful of world leaders at the United Nations in New York last week and painted a stark picture of how the financial meltdown was threatening his eastern Caribbean island.

Customs revenues, which account for half of the government's budget, have plummeted by at least 25 percent. Tourists vacationing in his Spice Isle have dropped by 20 percent. And $700 million in construction, part of the island's post-Hurricane Ivan rebuilding boom, has grounded to a halt.

The financial misery hitting the United States, and spreading across the globe, Thomas said, was plunging tiny Grenada ``into widespread poverty.''

''Even where we have within our own limited resources attempted to establish fiscal measures to mitigate the impact of the crisis, these measures have proven to be insufficient, if not inadequate,'' Thomas said at the special summit on the world economy.

Grenada isn't alone. As leaders of the 15-member Caribbean Community begin a four-day summit in Guyana on Thursday focusing on regional issues from immigration to trade to climate change, coming up with a one-size-fits-all regional plan to protect their already vulnerable economies from peril will top the agenda.

Once believing they were insulated from the financial crisis gripping the United Kingdom, and their largest trading partner, the United States, Caribbean governments are increasingly worried as remittances decline, foreign investors dwindle and tourism dampens.

In the Bahamas, the decline in U.S. travelers has triggered layoffs at popular hotels while one resort -- the Four Seasons in Exuma -- shut its doors in May.

In Barbados, European vacationers -- no longer able to afford their Caribbean dream -- are putting luxury condos and beachfront homes up for sale.

But it's not just tourism that is taking a hit.

In Jamaica, plunging demand for aluminum products has triggered layoffs and cuts in production at bauxite plants. A decline in remittances and the depreciating Jamaican dollar have forced the government to raise interest rates while other Caribbean governments have reduced them in hope of stimulating local economies.

''Our economies have been suffering quite a lot,'' said Maurice Odle, economic advisor to Caricom Secretary General Edwin Carrington and head of one of two task forces charged with coming up with a regional response.

Odle said until now, Caribbean governments have largely tackled the crisis alone. Many have launched their own stimulus plans with programs ranging from reducing taxes and interest rates, increasing public expenditures on new roads and subsidizing school uniforms, to offering sharp discounts to tourists.

''The tourists came, but they spent less and government got less revenue,'' Odle said. ``The governments have found themselves in quite a bit of trouble, and what they have now been trying to do is borrow.''

Caribbean Development Bank President Compton Bourne said ``all across the board, there has been some negative effects.''

A recent study by the International Monetary Fund predicted that the crisis will cause negative growth in seven Caribbean nations, including the Bahamas, Jamaica and Barbados.

Governments, he said, need to have access to other sources of revenues to help them soften the blow and keep their economies afloat.

And while a few countries -- St. Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Kitts and Nevis -- have asked the IMF for small loans, and Jamaica is debating turning to the financial institution for help, most IMF financing is not accessible to middle-income countries, which characterizes many Caribbean nations.

''There needs to be some exceptions to the normal application of the rules to access those resources,'' said Bourne, who heads another Caricom task force that recently sent a report to the secretary general suggesting how the region can approach financial institutions.

One suggestion is for the cash-strapped Eastern Caribbean nations to band together to request that the European Union relax some of the rules preventing them from accessing funds that have already been approved but not yet disbursed to the region.

Bourne said as part of his task force's report, the group also focused on those programs that seem to be having success in some Caribbean countries to see if they can be replicated regionwide -- and how they might be funded. Despite the grim outlook, regional officials insist it's not time to panic. They concede, however, that how the region fares will depend on how long it takes the economies to recover once the crisis in the United States and elsewhere subsides.

''While there has been a slowdown of economic growth and, in some cases, recession, a lot depends on whether the major economies bottom out and how long that process is,'' Bourne said. ``Essentially, we should be doing something proactive in anticipation of the situation worsening.''

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THis is supposed to be a great season for British tourism with the weak pound bringing international visitors here as well as keeping the Brits at home.

Are you seeing busy pubs and restaurants?

Are you struggling to get accomodation for weekend breaks?

Are the metropolitan centres struggling?

Tell us what is going on around the country.......

We have a restaurant in Weymouth in Dorset. After a very tough winter we have had record months in April, May and June. July is of to a flyer too. The weather has helped obviously, but in general we are seeing Brits and foreigners coming in their droves and spending when they get here.

Thought you were selling up

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London has been crawling with tourists all year :angry:

The filthy beggars dont even know how to speak ENGLISH!!! :huh:

We were only filthy because the air in London was so dirty, and it was English, we just speak a bit funny up here! :P

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Thought you were selling up

Trying to complete in early September.....Take the money and run ;)

It would be the best time of year to sell. We get the biggest months of the season and don't have to worry about November, or swine flu, or the VAT increase! In a seasonal town you make the cash in the summer and watch it bleed away in the winter!

We want to be nearer to family support while we have more babies.....Mrs HTBB wants a football team. I'd be happier with a beach volleyball team.

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You are hearing but not listening to what she is saying.......!

;)

Ha Ha! :lol:

As long as I get the ladies brazilian beach volleyball team! ;)

Edited by Hip to be bear

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Went to a posh place in the West End tuesday night - I'd rather have gone and had curry in Brick Lane myself, but I was persuaded otherwise - and it was rammed as was the whole area. Seemed like a mix of tourists and Londoners. Several of the group made comments of the 'I thought there was supposed to be a recession on' so it wasn't just me that was a bit surprised.

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West End is absolutely rammed with people - although the offers on toptable.co.uk are getting better and better, which suggests that not all is well. There's a restaurant on Savile Row that is normally £45 a head, offering three course fixed menu dinner for £15.

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I work in tourism alot of the time - loads of tourists have stayed at home because they cannot afford to go away. They are not spending on the whole. Middle price range hotels are struggling. Cheap B&Bs are doing well. The top end is doing very well. Campsites were doing well but am beginning to hear moans that people are going home early because of the weather. Spending per head is well down in many tourist hot spots.

Edited by gruffydd

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I work in tourism alot of the time - loads of tourists have stayed at home because they cannot afford to go away. They are not spending on the whole. Middle price range hotels are struggling. Cheap B&Bs are doing well. The top end is doing very well. Campsites were doing well but am beginning to hear moans that people are going home early because of the weather. Spending per head is well down in many tourist hot spots.

Work for Brewing, hotels, pubs group.

Sales bouyant on the back of squeezed margins. Lower end 'value' offers pulling in the punters and a lot of evidence of middle class diners trading down

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Went to a posh, expensive Mayfair restaurant for lunch on saturday; busy with a mix of locals and tourists, but not packed. We went for lunch because it was booked up for the evening service; the lady who served us told us that their evening service was pretty much fully booked for 3 weeks ahead and they had been running at near capacity most evenings since early May.

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I always chat to restaurant owners when eating at their establishments - usually becasue I go at wierd times when there are no other punters. One was saying he is funding his BTL shortfall from the restaurant biz. Takeaways still holding up for him, but business down overall about 20%. He wasn't happy about his rents not covering his BTL interest only mortgages. Flats in Brum

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Speaking from the point of view of provincial luxury type hotels it seems that there is a lot of mixed evidence.

We stayed in the Salthouse Hotel in Ipswich a few weeks ago and it was absolutely rammed. Then by contrast I checked out Tuddenham Mill for this weekend and discovered they still have at least 2 (of just 15) rooms free all weekend. I thought this sort of boutique type top end hotels would be getting absolutely killed in the downturn but so far they seem to be hanging tough.

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Speaking from the point of view of provincial luxury type hotels it seems that there is a lot of mixed evidence.

We stayed in the Salthouse Hotel in Ipswich a few weeks ago and it was absolutely rammed. Then by contrast I checked out Tuddenham Mill for this weekend and discovered they still have at least 2 (of just 15) rooms free all weekend. I thought this sort of boutique type top end hotels would be getting absolutely killed in the downturn but so far they seem to be hanging tough.

Surely the one time hotels will be full is July and August?

Its just a (bad) recession, its not the apocalypse :blink:

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Speaking from the point of view of provincial luxury type hotels it seems that there is a lot of mixed evidence.

We stayed in the Salthouse Hotel in Ipswich a few weeks ago and it was absolutely rammed. Then by contrast I checked out Tuddenham Mill for this weekend and discovered they still have at least 2 (of just 15) rooms free all weekend. I thought this sort of boutique type top end hotels would be getting absolutely killed in the downturn but so far they seem to be hanging tough.

I know quite a few people who, having decided to forego their expensive family holiday this year, are going away for the weekend almost every weekend. Perhaps that's why?

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Yeah you are right, it's not apocalypse by any means.. My mum also suggested that people were going away to the UK rather than abroad. That said, a few nights in one of these hotels you could go abroad for that sort of money...

We couldn't find anywhere for Saturday night in the end, every single boutique type hotel in East Anglia was booked up, so we went out for a nice dinner in London instead.

I'm just surprised that these type of high end places (£200+ a night) are holding up so well really, but I take the point that it is Summer.

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Update from a Dorset restaurant:

After a record April, May, June and July, August is looking less rosy. It is not that the town is not busy...far from it, but we are a smart restaurant and those that are here are not really our kind of punters. Plenty of foreign visitors this year taking advantage of the cheap pound.

My conclusion is that instead of going for a second trip in May June, or an overseas city break, many have had short breaks in the UK. The family tourists are trading down...so the fish and chip shops should be doing ok!

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