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swissy_fit

Why Do Most Hybrid Cars Use Gasoline Not Diesel?

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Diesel engines are (I thought) particularly economical when run steadily. So they ought to suit the role of backup generator. However they keep building gasoline hybrids.

Any car geeks care to explain?

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Diesel engines are (I thought) particularly economical when run steadily. So they ought to suit the role of backup generator. However they keep building gasoline hybrids.

Any car geeks care to explain?

It could be due to the target markets. Californian law (and US legislation to a lesser exent) mandates lower emissions, hence the push for hybrids by the auto makers in those markets. Diesel laws in the US are very different to Europe, adapting a diesel engine to pass US tests is much more costly (with more effort) compared to a petrol engine.

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It's tough to sell diesel cars in the US market although VW are now making a serious effort. Also diesel engines are heavier and hybrids are already lard arses.

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There would not be such a noticeable gain in economy with diesel either. Particularly at idle and low revs/low speeds (ie stop/start city traffic when hybrids electric engines are used) diesels are far more efficient than petrols.

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There would not be such a noticeable gain in economy with diesel either. Particularly at idle and low revs/low speeds (ie stop/start city traffic when hybrids electric engines are used) diesels are far more efficient than petrols.

Given that the only place that a hybrid has any advantage is in stop/start city traffic and the rest of the time you are paying to lug around the extra expensive weight I would suggest that traffic management should aim to keep traffic flowing rather than to impede the flow.

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Diesel engines are far dirtier than petrol engines so don’t meet all American state regulations.

Also diesel up until recently was a lot more expensive than petrol.

For example it was say, petrol £1.00 and diesel £1.10.

That to us looks like diesel is just 10% more expensive, but when you strip the tax out it is. Petrol: 35p, diesel 45p. or diesel is some 35% more expensive than petrol.

So presumably the higher efficiency doesn’t make up for the more expensive fuel.

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Petrol hybrids are good for round town and congested roads. Diesel is suited to long steady loads like motorways.

As stated above US consumers don't much like diesels (pure prejudice but there you go). Modern diesels are clean but petrol is (so I'm told) just a bit cleaner (there are different polutions from each - someone more technical might fill in). I think both will meet all US regulations though.

Hybrid petrol is IMHO a gimmick.

IIRC Ford developed a lean burn engine (petrol) that was nearly as good as a diesel but it would not work with a catalytic converter. Cats at the time were mandatory for the US market but not here in Europe. The lean burn got shelved and we went to cats. Cats only work when hot and in a cold country (all of Northern Europe) are not really much use at all.

As ever the yanks dominate the market and the world follows. Nothing to do with the environment or practicality, just the usual politics and economic effect of the huge US consumer market.

Things will change - ooohh I see they already are begining to :D

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Given that the only place that a hybrid has any advantage is in stop/start city traffic and the rest of the time you are paying to lug around the extra expensive weight I would suggest that traffic management should aim to keep traffic flowing rather than to impede the flow.

Well, thats another topic entirely.

Although i recall (top gear episode?) testing a lexus hybrid where the electric engine actually also kicked once the petrol had hit the rev limiter - they said it was strange to have flatlined at about 6k revs, and yet still be accelerating!

Again, diesel engines and electric engines have more torque than regular petrol, so i again id imagine the characteristics of the diesel engine render the hybrid pretty much redundant in maintaining a high speed.

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