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Guest KingCharles1st

Have Been Looking At A "small But Quaint" High Street Shop

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Guest KingCharles1st

Local Market town and old trade route, beams, Stagecoach arches, that kind of thing, but precious few shops, but all the normal stuff already covered.

Loads of hairdressers, were 4 EA's (now 2) a new coffee bar, high class opticians and dentist. Being rural the pet shop is established. There is a trinkety shop which sells do dads and does ok. Even an old fashioned wine bar with small art outlet.

The rent is "do-able," but only with decent profit expected from whatever you decide to do. Always quite fancied a high street shop, would suit something a bit "alternative," but can't quite decide what.

Ideas?

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I'm basically shopping at Asda and Tescos now.. the prices are just that unbeatable. I feel sorry for the small shops as their set costs are so high, it has to be priced into what they sell. The confiscatory amounts of their rent, lawyer fees, insurance, accountancy costs, taxes..

The only thing I could think of that might fill the growing number of empty shops is in the 2020's.. stem cell therapy type clinics. Like want new, healthy adult stem cells to repopulate your liver with young healthy liver cells?.. go to Johnny's Liver shop and confectionary. Bladder failing? Visit Heather's Bladders and Intestines.

The problem right now is a place has to be very specialized to beat the big box players - like bridal fashions. But also do enough volume to overcome the very high fixed costs of doing business in Britain.

So what I am seeing is like what you mentioned Opticians, Dentists, all different kinds of doctors, accounting offices, lawyers. But like clothing shops, shoe shops, specialty shops, video rental, music stores, cards.. are dropping like flies.

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Local Market town and old trade route, beams, Stagecoach arches, that kind of thing, but precious few shops, but all the normal stuff already covered.

Loads of hairdressers, were 4 EA's (now 2) a new coffee bar, high class opticians and dentist. Being rural the pet shop is established. There is a trinkety shop which sells do dads and does ok. Even an old fashioned wine bar with small art outlet.

The rent is "do-able," but only with decent profit expected from whatever you decide to do. Always quite fancied a high street shop, would suit something a bit "alternative," but can't quite decide what.

Ideas?

I visit these sort of towns and villages and always wonder how the type of shop you describe (trinket shops etc) survive

Maybe there is still a generation of people who dont realise you can get everything on ebay and at Tesco now.

That may be the key. An internet business with a physical shopfront. That way the local population doesn't need to sustain the business and you can sell specialist stuff like coins, teddy bears or rare books - something you have a special knowledge of

Even the £1 shops are stuggling where I live but the same stuff sells for much more on ebay.

If I had no prior experience I would try a market stall first because you won't be spending money on doing up a shop etc to find that your business is not viable. Try a stall for a couple of weeks. You won't have to pack in your day job and if it doesnt work try another product until you find a demand

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Dental offices are not immune from the effects of recession. The overheads have gone up. Less pt seeking pvt treatments- which is the lifeline of all practices. NHS treatment hardly makes the practice break even. What you will see is a few practices close down. Dept of health is hell bent on killing small independent practices.

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Lots of people looking to sell off stuff, so some kind second hand shop might work. Give it a high tech twist by not only putting peoples stuff on display in the window but also offering to sell it for them on ebay for a commission.

There are a lots of people still that can't get to grips with the likes of ebay and I've often been asked "if I can do it for them."

Don't take on a big commitment or snared up in a long lease if you can avoid it. Try and get the shop on an informal basis until you can see if it will work.

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In our small town businesses that seem to be doing well:

- a trad sweet shop, taking over where Woolies left off

-

I had a high street shop for 16 years, so know my way around. Input from the guy with the Aldi avatar would be useful here as well.

The best business I know, pound for pound, in my town (Poole) is a traditional sweet shop. Cheap small premises, low capital outlay, easy to part-time staff it (with bright 17 yr olds from local grammar), almost recession proof, everyone wants the product. Sells to 5-80 age groups, male and female. Also does quality 'local' ice cream. Trades on the net as well with postal sales. A small gold mine.

Location is important. Footfall is everything. With a well-negotiated lease and rent (seriously buyers market now) you could do very well.

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we have an ebay shop somewhere in Oldham apparently....

I could see a net cafe where people could access ebay /tesco online has more of a chance than anything else.

Unless you pee money though I wouldn't bother if it's within 5 miles of a tesco

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Lots of people looking to sell off stuff, so some kind second hand shop might work. Give it a high tech twist by not only putting peoples stuff on display in the window but also offering to sell it for them on ebay for a commission.

There are a lots of people still that can't get to grips with the likes of ebay and I've often been asked "if I can do it for them."

Don't take on a big commitment or snared up in a long lease if you can avoid it. Try and get the shop on an informal basis until you can see if it will work.

That is actually a very good idea. I see a problem though. People seem to be trying to hang on to what they have and are trying to improvise with what they need. There are more sales likely on ebay than on the high street per se.

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Guest UK Debt Slave
Local Market town and old trade route, beams, Stagecoach arches, that kind of thing, but precious few shops, but all the normal stuff already covered.

Loads of hairdressers, were 4 EA's (now 2) a new coffee bar, high class opticians and dentist. Being rural the pet shop is established. There is a trinkety shop which sells do dads and does ok. Even an old fashioned wine bar with small art outlet.

The rent is "do-able," but only with decent profit expected from whatever you decide to do. Always quite fancied a high street shop, would suit something a bit "alternative," but can't quite decide what.

Ideas?

A Survivalist centre ;)

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Guest KingCharles1st
A Survivalist centre ;)

You mean a "guns 'n beans" shop- :rolleyes:

Actually thats a pretty good name for a shop innit

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Guest UK Debt Slave
You mean a "guns 'n beans" shop- :rolleyes:

Actually thats a pretty good name for a shop innit

Yeah! I like that! :rolleyes:

Wont it just look perfect in the High Street of some quaint market town, in between Mrs Miggin's pie shop and the local cream teas emporium? :lol:

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Yeah! I like that! :rolleyes:

Wont it just look perfect in the High Street of some quaint market town, in between Mrs Miggin's pie shop and the local cream teas emporium? :lol:

We had one open in Hereford recently. On a roundabout where a petshop closed down

They put manikins dressed in military gear out on the pavement in a sort of "fighting" stance. Quite eyecatching

Not being able to sell guns, ammo or big knives to chavs may limit your market though

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Butcher's or even better, a baker's. Or even a fishmonger's.

No, I'm not kidding. I'd never have believed the truly negative effect that supermarkets have on local businesses until I saw how well a community can do without them.

I live near Pitshanger Lane in Ealing and I can tell you that because of the lack of close proximity of any supermarket, the baker's and butcher's are thriving. The baker's has bread which you can't buy in supermarkets - cheese bread, stilton bread, polish bread, italian herb bread - all freshly made.

You won't get that in Tescos or Sainsburys.

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Guest KingCharles1st
Butcher's or even better, a baker's. Or even a fishmonger's.

No, I'm not kidding. I'd never have believed the truly negative effect that supermarkets have on local businesses until I saw how well a community can do without them.

I live near Pitshanger Lane in Ealing and I can tell you that because of the lack of close proximity of any supermarket, the baker's and butcher's are thriving. The baker's has bread which you can't buy in supermarkets - cheese bread, stilton bread, polish bread, italian herb bread - all freshly made.

You won't get that in Tescos or Sainsburys.

Mmmm- it s way too small for that kind of thing- and I don't have the skills, ans even if i did ...

Already two Butchers in the High Street- and a good bakers- fishmongers- well not me Im afraid but they do seem o be terribly rare nowdays.

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Gun shop: Plenty potential customers if it's rural and you can't really be out done by the internet 'cos you can't sell guns and ammo mail order.

Home Brew shop: My local one is often heaving. People often queing out the door on a weekend these days and you don't need to fork out a fortune on set-up costs.

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Guest UK Debt Slave
Butcher's or even better, a baker's. Or even a fishmonger's.

No, I'm not kidding. I'd never have believed the truly negative effect that supermarkets have on local businesses until I saw how well a community can do without them.

I live near Pitshanger Lane in Ealing and I can tell you that because of the lack of close proximity of any supermarket, the baker's and butcher's are thriving. The baker's has bread which you can't buy in supermarkets - cheese bread, stilton bread, polish bread, italian herb bread - all freshly made.

You won't get that in Tescos or Sainsburys.

We have a fantastic local butchers here.

I never buy meat from supermarkets. It's terribly expensive for such poor quality. Marks & Spencer is the only supermarket that has decent chicken

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Local food and drink - depends a bit where you are I guess. This sort of thing does well down here in Westcountry.

You know the type of thing - local sausages, chutney, cheese, country wine - tried elderflower wine recently - it was v good - 12.5%!

All this stuff sells at premium prices because it's 'local' or looks like it anyway. Theres always folk around who'll pay for a bit of local sausage. You might have to put on a bit of an accent loike and say things like - I was up at five this morning picking those ar mushrooms ;)

Good luck.

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Anyone starting a business needs to do at least 2 things: cashflow projection and market research. You seem to be doing your market research by asking the people who hang around posting on a website about house prices what you should sell in a shop. Your business will last at most 8 months, unless you've got a lot of savings to tide you over.

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We have a fantastic local butchers here.

I never buy meat from supermarkets. It's terribly expensive for such poor quality. Marks & Spencer is the only supermarket that has decent chicken

Yup I've rediscovered the local butcher too. You get meat and sausages from him that don't explode in a chemical firework display in the pan, or shrink to nothing.

Wish there was a local green grocer too, but Romford market has good fruit and veg.

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Anyone starting a business needs to do at least 2 things: cashflow projection and market research. You seem to be doing your market research by asking the people who hang around posting on a website about house prices what you should sell in a shop. Your business will last at most 8 months, unless you've got a lot of savings to tide you over.

Agree with your first point. But there are people on this forum with a lot of retail experience, both at micro and macro levels. It would be foolish not to use free expertise.

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