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Jonnybegood

Areas People Want To Live Getting Smaller

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Back 11 years ago when me and the missus were last looking to move we drew up a shortlist of 5 areas we would consider moving in the 30 mile radius.

The criteria was right type property, good schools, transport links, local community and local for a good pub and few shops.

In the end we found somewhere that ticked all the boxes but all 5 areas were of a high standard and it was very hard to choice between them.

Then last weekend we had friends around who moved out of the area 8 years ago and are now looking to come back, they find themselves in a similar dilemma as we were 11 years ago, however they can only find 3 areas that meet the criteria and those 3 areas now clearly have a premium, when i asked about other areas that cost less the main reasons they say they are not suitable is the chavvy appearance , lots of rented accommodation and the mixing at school with the other kids.

It just seems that over the last decade areas that used to be acceptable to settle down with the family are no longer due to various different reasons, nobody wants to pay good money and have different neighbours every couple of years with no community feel, decent hard working people don't want to be rubbing shoulders with chavs on a daily basis, but it seems that the BTL era has in many cases turned decent private estates in rented chav areas.

Where we live there is a community feel with very few rented properties, due mainly to the age of the properties (greater maintenance) and purchase cost.

The only 3 rented properties I know of have long term professionals in them, so they are as good as owner occupied.

The majority of the property around here I would imagine is owned outright and people tend to take pride in their properties appearance, average age is around 45ish.

It is not very often a property comes on the market but when it does its not on there for long, prices within a 10 miles radius are down 8% on 2007 prices but very hard to establish as very little for sale.

The way I see this going forward is a widening of the gap between the want to live and do not want to live areas, it seems the number of decent areas is rapidly falling and people even today are willing to pay a premium to live in these areas.

Some areas have been overdeveloped and along with it brought its own problems, however many established areas do not have this problem and manage to retain their community feel, it goes back to the supply and demand argument.

I do not think we have a shortage of properties, just a shortage of the right type of property in the right type of area, this is obvious by the large number of apartments for sale at 50% less than 2007 prices.

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Yep. The street we used to live on had changed rapidly from a standard working class street to a messy HMO slumland in a few years, with 'normal families' marooned. Jungle gardens, random rusty rubbish piled up outside, illegal parking, you know the score.

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Back 11 years ago when me and the missus were last looking to move we drew up a shortlist of 5 areas we would consider moving in the 30 mile radius.

The criteria was right type property, good schools, transport links, local community and local for a good pub and few shops.

In the end we found somewhere that ticked all the boxes but all 5 areas were of a high standard and it was very hard to choice between them.

Then last weekend we had friends around who moved out of the area 8 years ago and are now looking to come back, they find themselves in a similar dilemma as we were 11 years ago, however they can only find 3 areas that meet the criteria and those 3 areas now clearly have a premium, when i asked about other areas that cost less the main reasons they say they are not suitable is the chavvy appearance , lots of rented accommodation and the mixing at school with the other kids.

It just seems that over the last decade areas that used to be acceptable to settle down with the family are no longer due to various different reasons, nobody wants to pay good money and have different neighbours every couple of years with no community feel, decent hard working people don't want to be rubbing shoulders with chavs on a daily basis, but it seems that the BTL era has in many cases turned decent private estates in rented chav areas.

Where we live there is a community feel with very few rented properties, due mainly to the age of the properties (greater maintenance) and purchase cost.

The only 3 rented properties I know of have long term professionals in them, so they are as good as owner occupied.

The majority of the property around here I would imagine is owned outright and people tend to take pride in their properties appearance, average age is around 45ish.

It is not very often a property comes on the market but when it does its not on there for long, prices within a 10 miles radius are down 8% on 2007 prices but very hard to establish as very little for sale.

The way I see this going forward is a widening of the gap between the want to live and do not want to live areas, it seems the number of decent areas is rapidly falling and people even today are willing to pay a premium to live in these areas.

Some areas have been overdeveloped and along with it brought its own problems, however many established areas do not have this problem and manage to retain their community feel, it goes back to the supply and demand argument.

I do not think we have a shortage of properties, just a shortage of the right type of property in the right type of area, this is obvious by the large number of apartments for sale at 50% less than 2007 prices.

You sound a desperately shallow individual more concerned about appearance than the "chavs" you so obviously despise.

I count myself fortunate that my income level prevents you from living anywhere near me.

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This was always the problem of hpi for me. Who would spend a lot of money to live next to the sort of people who could only spend a third what you can afford but just bought years before.

The choice was rent, or pay 7 times earnings to escape the scum. Nothings changed so far.

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Government is promoting a 'social inclusion' housing policy whereby they mix people from different age groups, backgrounds etc in a bid to avoid disparity between housing areas. This is borne out through allocating council houses to a variety of people rather than, for example, putting old folk together in the little cottages as was done in the past. They also try to push mixed housing into new development through the planning system.

All it results in is a reduction in the variety of choice a freer market would provide. Once again, pointless government meddling IMO.

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Your wifes not called `Hyacinth` by any chance is she - please tell where these 3 areas are located so I can avoid finding myself living next to such lower-middle class snobs ...

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One of my pet hates in the brutalisation of the urban environment. You know the sort of thing, bigger, wider roads with lots of paint and signs and barriers, spikey fences around schools and virtually every other public or commercial premises. Too many cars all parked in roads. I could go on but it would depress me.

I agree its painful to look around some of these areas and much of it is unnecessary. But people are paranoid about safety. Whether it be safety of children in school, safety at their workplace, safety in their car etc. The govt responds by bringing in rafts of policies requiring minimum roads standards, lighting standards, school fence height standards and just about every other standard under the sun. People feel safer but the place looks terrible and manufactured.

As an example, i remember a converted steading which was located in a very rural area. The Council required a full width road was installed to access the units off the main road about 200 yards away. They also told the developer to install footpaths on either side plus standarised full height street lighting. Why? so the binmen could safely come up the road to pick up the residents bins :blink:

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Have you something against people who rent? Are renters chavs? Are chavs renters?

The road where my parents live used to be almost entirely owner/occupier, and with hindsight it was quite a pleasant place to grow up. Now, though, much of it is rented out as HMOs because people on 15k a year can't afford a 300k mortgage; the result is noise, mess and people trying to park four cars in front of a house that only has room for one.

I've spent much of my life in rented accommodation and tried not to cause trouble for my neighbours, but the simple reality is that people who rent know they're only there for a short time, know there's no benefit to them of looking after the landlord's house and almost inevitably bring down the neighbourhood as a result. Particularly when you pack six of them in one house.

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Government is promoting a 'social inclusion' housing policy whereby they mix people from different age groups, backgrounds etc in a bid to avoid disparity between housing areas. This is borne out through allocating council houses to a variety of people rather than, for example, putting old folk together in the little cottages as was done in the past. They also try to push mixed housing into new development through the planning system.

All it results in is a reduction in the variety of choice a freer market would provide. Once again, pointless government meddling IMO.

Its called gerrymandering.

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Have you something against people who rent? Are renters chavs? Are chavs renters?

When kids go to school, should they not mix?

No I have nothing against those who rent and treat their property and neighbourhood as they would if they owned the property.

But unfortunately as already mentioned quite often private streets / estates suddenly become overrun with rented property, the community feel of the area goes and from one year to the next you do not know who your neighbour is.

I am not saying all renters are the same, the majority look after and respect their neighbourhood its just all to often you see overgrown gardens, mattress on the front lawn, rusting car on the drive in the property that is rented.

Quite quickly the image of the area can change for the worst.

As for schooling when I went to school I kept the same circle of friends right through, when you have families come and go in a area it can difficult for children to bond, you don't their parents or their background.

I am all for kids mixing, but it is important they get a good start in life

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