Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Injin

Student Grants And Loans To Be Frozen And Tuition Fees To Increase

Recommended Posts

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2009/j...ts-loans-frozen

The government today announced that it is freezing student grants and loans and cutting financial support for trainee teachers but increasing tuition fees.

In a statement to the Commons, the university minister David Lammy said the moves, which will come into effect in September 2010, were a reaction to the tough economic climate.

Grants for poorer students and universal maintenance loans will be frozen for the first time since the system was introduced and fees will increase by 2.04% to £3,290. The loans given to cover fees will increase accordingly.

Teacher training grants are being cut to meet the grant given to other students and a decision to award all students who get a grant to study at school a university grant has been reversed. These grants will now be means tested.

Lammy said: "In these difficult economic times, we are continuing to take difficult decisions in the interests of students, universities and taxpayers alike.

"We have therefore decided to maintain the current package of maintenance support for full-time students, reflecting the current low inflationary environment."

Education, education, bailing out my mate Toby who works at Jp morgan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Freezing the grant is not good, can't stress how much the poorer students really need that to keep up with the rich gits who have daddy pay their rent.

Total materials/ printing / computer hardware costs for the degree I just finished come to a total of about £2k, give or take. There's a lot of extra expense that students are expected to casually fork out for on top of the tution fees.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its a back door way of cutting student numbers while still giving the lie that anyone with the ability can aspire to higher education.

Edited by Ulfar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Oxbridge lot will feel vindicated. Play the long game and the pressure from the oiks to invade was always going to run

into trouble. Watch the Colleges now invent their own 'extras' and hidden fees to boost income. Meritocracy my a***.

Word from the academic front line tells me that in the past few years student expectations and I suppose, access to

discretionary spending money has gone up substantially. The present student experience does not generally include

lentils and baked beans as staple food. So perhaps there is some slack. Anyway, a few hunger pangs may make students

take a more active view of current affairs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Freezing the grant is not good, can't stress how much the poorer students really need that to keep up with the rich gits who have daddy pay their rent.

Total materials/ printing / computer hardware costs for the degree I just finished come to a total of about £2k, give or take. There's a lot of extra expense that students are expected to casually fork out for on top of the tution fees.

I never understood the means testing on grants. Once you're 18, you're no longre the responsibility of your parents so why the f**k should it matter what they earn??? What if your uber rich parents simply wouldn't pay for you?

I went to University aged 27 to 30 and got full grant, mature student supplement and no fees. Thanks Maggie. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The polyversities are going to get hammered. What the article doesn't state is that most of the increase in students from poorer backgrounds is accounted for by the post-92s, from whom a degree is, as a general rule, less likely to translate into higher earning power than one from a Russell or a redbrick. Expect to see UG applications to the post-92s fall off a cliff. Boy am I glad that I swapped Teesside for Leeds three years ago!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The government today announced that it is freezing student grants and loans and cutting financial support for trainee teachers but increasing tuition fees.

Am I reading this wrong they are making tough decisions in economic times yet feel the need to increase tuition fees? :blink:

Surely it should be the opposite?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Am I reading this wrong they are making tough decisions in economic times yet feel the need to increase tuition fees? :blink:

Surely it should be the opposite?

They are paying out the insiders - classic end of empire/rebuilding pay offs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They just need to filter out all the flotsam.

Our British Universities are filled to capacity and half of the students probably aren't academically qualified to really be there.

Watered down system.

Tighten it up and give the genuinely smart students a break.

Then again, these are private institutions driven by profits.

Despair.

Edited by cashinmattress

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But the information was released last month by the former Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills following an FoI request by Times Higher Education into correspondence concerning the ongoing funding crisis at London Metropolitan University, where 550 jobs are at risk following the over-reporting of student completion rates.

It looks like we have some potential MP candidates here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's clear these are post-92 institutions. Anyone got any ideas which ones?

The London Met issue (incorrect reporting of progression rates) is a short-term one to do with internal accounting procedures rather than a fundamental one to do with its core viability. The latter may also exist, of course, but I'd be suprised if the former brought the institution down on its own.

Leeds Met is definitely high risk. It's sunk huge amounts of money into high risk building projects and business ventures (e.g. buying into a rugby team), the viability of which was entirely predicated on ever rising UG student numbers, which, like HPI, has hit the buffers. Rumours are doing the rounds at my institution, the University of Leeds, that our management has been informally approached about a merger, and has responded by telling them where to go. If so, good.

Others I've heard rumours about include Abertay Dundee, Liverpool Hope, U of Chichester and U of Northampton, with the U of Luton at risk of severe contraction (i.e. entire faculties and departments being guillotined).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The London Met issue (incorrect reporting of progression rates) is a short-term one to do with internal accounting

Others I've heard rumours about include Abertay Dundee, Liverpool Hope, U of Chichester and U of Northampton, with the U of Luton at risk of severe contraction (i.e. entire faculties and departments being guillotined).

Are you daring to imply that their rebranding as Bedfordshire hasn't transformed their prospects??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thames Valley University?

Just a hunch.

Ask Peter Mandelson - he has just taken on Universities

The very minimum they are cutting is 2% of the teaching grant across entire HE - £100 million or so

Still feeling safe in a public sector job :lol::lol::lol:

Another BTL property to view this weekend :lol::lol::lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you daring to imply that their rebranding as Bedfordshire hasn't transformed their prospects??

For all Les Ebdon's in-yer-face and nauseating posturing in the Times Higher Ed, yup, it ain't worked. And part of the reason for that posturing is that he realises that his own institution is in a strategically weak position. Protesting too much, etc. etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'Middle class students turn their backs on university as tuition fees soar' [July 2009]:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11...ersity-tuition-

Labour's hike in tuition fees is fuelling a decline in the proportion of middle-class students at university, it has emerged.Six years ago, 45 per cent of youngsters from more well-off backgrounds went to university compared with 41 per cent last year.

There are fears that many, especially those who narrowly fail to qualify for grants and university bursaries, are deciding a university degree is not worth the financial sacrifice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   296 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.