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110,000 New Council Homes - What Does It Mean To Prices?

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Housing tops Brown's policy plans

Mr Brown promised to unveil his vision in 2007 but the plans were delayed

Gordon Brown has set out his policy plans for the next year - including a move to let councils give local people more priority on housing waiting lists.

The programme also includes plans to cut benefits of the young unemployed who refuse a job or training offer.

He said his proposals, seen by some as an early election manifesto, would "drive growth forward".

Tory leader David Cameron called it a "relaunch without a spending tag" and accused ministers of "dishonesty".

His comments came after Lord Mandelson said a scheduled review of spending would not be held before an election.

New homes

The policy document unveiled by Mr Brown in the House of Commons is called "Building Britain's future" although many proposals relate to England only as a result of devolution in areas such as health and education.

Among pledges he told MPs investment in housing would be trebled to £2.1bn, funding 110,000 new affordable homes to rent or buy over the next two years and creating 45,000 jobs in construction.

There is a real choice for our country, driving growth forward or letting the recession take its course

Gordon Brown

At a glance: the main proposals

Nick Robinson: election manifesto?

"By building new and additional homes we can also now reform social housing allocation enabling local authorities to give more priority to local people whose names have been on waiting lists for far too long," he said.

Downing Street said it would mean "new flexibilities" for local authorities in response to the "perception"' that the current system is unfair.

Homeless people and those in very overcrowded accommodation would remain a priority, he said, but some preference could also be given to people with local connections stuck on the waiting list for a long time.

It is seen as a response to the growth in a few traditional Labour areas of BNP support but is likely to prove controversial.

Work 'obligation'

At a press conference earlier Mr Cameron warned ministers to be "very, very careful with the language that they use".

He said Mr Brown's "British jobs for British workers" slogan had done "a huge amount of damage to the prime minister's credibility and helped to build up parties that none of us want to build up".

Mr Brown also told MPs that, from January, everyone under 25 years old who has been unemployed for a year would get a guaranteed job, work experience or training place - and by "next spring" would have the "obligation to accept that guaranteed offer" or face having their benefits cut.

When is someone going to tell him that he's run out of money?

David Cameron on Labour's plans

Those who refuse a suitable job offer could lose two weeks benefit, four weeks if they turn a job down a second time and 26 weeks for a third failure.

Children at state secondary schools would be guaranteed a personal tutor - and would get one-to-one catch up tuition where needed.

He also confirmed plans to guarantee that nobody needing to see an NHS cancer specialist would have to wait more than two weeks and ensure no one would wait more than 18 weeks for hospital treatment.

And he said the government would legislate in the next session to remove the last hereditary peers from the Lords and to allow peers to be thrown out "where there is reason to do so".

Royal Mail

Mr Brown said: "There is a real choice for our country, driving growth forward or letting the recession take its course."

But Conservative leader David Cameron said many of the announcements had been rehashed and said Mr Brown had made no mention of the apparent delay in plans to part-privatise the Royal Mail.

He added: "The prime minister talks about building Britain's future, but isn't it time the British people were asked whether they want him to be part of it?"

Cameron accuses Brown of dishonesty

He accused Mr Brown of living in a "dream world": "When is someone going to tell him that he's run out of money?"

And Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg described the programme as "a hotch potch of unrelated Whitehall schemes" with no unifying vision from a prime minister who was "running out of steam".

The BBC's political editor Nick Robinson said the plans essentially amounted to the Labour Party's manifesto for the next general election.

Earlier on BBC Radio 4's Today programme the Business Secretary Lord Mandelson suggested that there would not be a spending review before the next general election.

Mr Brown was asked about it later but would only say that "no government has given more detail on spending allocations" and it was a "matter for the chancellor".

The Treasury says no decision has been made.

Mr Cameron said delaying the review was a "blatant attempt to cover up the truth about Labour's cuts".

He said he preferred to fight the next election on "a straightforward, frank and honest platform" and warned that "riots on the street" might follow if spending cuts were made after an election campaign in which politicians "pretended" they were not needed.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/8123723.stm

I wonder what this will do to prices?

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We need at least 10,000 in Oldham, so find another 10 towns needing the same and that number is all used up.

But it must have a slight downward effect due to removing some first time buyers.

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But it must have a slight downward effect due to removing some first time buyers.

I reckon if they built 20k houses in Oldham at council rents they'd fill them within 2 weeks. There's at least 10k on the list, probably 11k+ more since I last looked the figure up... and I know shed loads of people in private rented who won't even go on the waiting list because they know they'll never have priority so there's no point.

It might help kill the privat rented sector further which seems insanely expensive to me - although we're seeing some drops on rent prices, and more signs nearly every day...

There's just something sensible about having cheap rented accomodation ... it strikes me as the thing to win votes amongst everyone apart from BTL.

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Housing tops Brown's policy plans

Mr Brown promised to unveil his vision in 2007 but the plans were delayed

Among pledges he told MPs investment in housing would be trebled to £2.1bn, funding 110,000 new affordable homes to rent or buy over the next two years and creating 45,000 jobs in construction.

I wonder what this will do to prices?

Plans delayed :lol: ...why wait until now when this should have been happening years ago...a very little far too late....but even this little bit will help.

House prices will not be going anywhere except slowly down then dragging along the bottom for the foreseeable future until this funding/risk crises ends.

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Housing tops Brown's policy plans

Mr Brown promised to unveil his vision in 2007 but the plans were delayed

Gordon Brown has set out his policy plans for the next year - including a move to let councils give local people more priority on housing waiting lists.

The programme also includes plans to cut benefits of the young unemployed who refuse a job or training offer.

He said his proposals, seen by some as an early election manifesto, would "drive growth forward".

Tory leader David Cameron called it a "relaunch without a spending tag" and accused ministers of "dishonesty".

His comments came after Lord Mandelson said a scheduled review of spending would not be held before an election.

New homes

The policy document unveiled by Mr Brown in the House of Commons is called "Building Britain's future" although many proposals relate to England only as a result of devolution in areas such as health and education.

Among pledges he told MPs investment in housing would be trebled to £2.1bn, funding 110,000 new affordable homes to rent or buy over the next two years and creating 45,000 jobs in construction.

There is a real choice for our country, driving growth forward or letting the recession take its course

Gordon Brown

At a glance: the main proposals

Nick Robinson: election manifesto?

"By building new and additional homes we can also now reform social housing allocation enabling local authorities to give more priority to local people whose names have been on waiting lists for far too long," he said.

Downing Street said it would mean "new flexibilities" for local authorities in response to the "perception"' that the current system is unfair.

Homeless people and those in very overcrowded accommodation would remain a priority, he said, but some preference could also be given to people with local connections stuck on the waiting list for a long time.

It is seen as a response to the growth in a few traditional Labour areas of BNP support but is likely to prove controversial.

Work 'obligation'

At a press conference earlier Mr Cameron warned ministers to be "very, very careful with the language that they use".

He said Mr Brown's "British jobs for British workers" slogan had done "a huge amount of damage to the prime minister's credibility and helped to build up parties that none of us want to build up".

Mr Brown also told MPs that, from January, everyone under 25 years old who has been unemployed for a year would get a guaranteed job, work experience or training place - and by "next spring" would have the "obligation to accept that guaranteed offer" or face having their benefits cut.

When is someone going to tell him that he's run out of money?

David Cameron on Labour's plans

Those who refuse a suitable job offer could lose two weeks benefit, four weeks if they turn a job down a second time and 26 weeks for a third failure.

Children at state secondary schools would be guaranteed a personal tutor - and would get one-to-one catch up tuition where needed.

He also confirmed plans to guarantee that nobody needing to see an NHS cancer specialist would have to wait more than two weeks and ensure no one would wait more than 18 weeks for hospital treatment.

And he said the government would legislate in the next session to remove the last hereditary peers from the Lords and to allow peers to be thrown out "where there is reason to do so".

Royal Mail

Mr Brown said: "There is a real choice for our country, driving growth forward or letting the recession take its course."

But Conservative leader David Cameron said many of the announcements had been rehashed and said Mr Brown had made no mention of the apparent delay in plans to part-privatise the Royal Mail.

He added: "The prime minister talks about building Britain's future, but isn't it time the British people were asked whether they want him to be part of it?"

Cameron accuses Brown of dishonesty

He accused Mr Brown of living in a "dream world": "When is someone going to tell him that he's run out of money?"

And Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg described the programme as "a hotch potch of unrelated Whitehall schemes" with no unifying vision from a prime minister who was "running out of steam".

The BBC's political editor Nick Robinson said the plans essentially amounted to the Labour Party's manifesto for the next general election.

Earlier on BBC Radio 4's Today programme the Business Secretary Lord Mandelson suggested that there would not be a spending review before the next general election.

Mr Brown was asked about it later but would only say that "no government has given more detail on spending allocations" and it was a "matter for the chancellor".

The Treasury says no decision has been made.

Mr Cameron said delaying the review was a "blatant attempt to cover up the truth about Labour's cuts".

He said he preferred to fight the next election on "a straightforward, frank and honest platform" and warned that "riots on the street" might follow if spending cuts were made after an election campaign in which politicians "pretended" they were not needed.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/8123723.stm

I wonder what this will do to prices?

I thought you already had to be "local" to even get on the list, by either living in the area, working in the area, or having family in the area. So how does this giving local people priority thing work?

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Among pledges he told MPs investment in housing would be trebled to £2.1bn, funding 110,000 new affordable homes to rent or buy over the next two years and creating 45,000 jobs in construction.

I wonder what this will do to prices?

Remember, by affordable he means via shared equity / key worker / or any other scheme that keeps the cost of houses inflated.

This way they can claim that they are providing homes for the many when they are actually using the new wave of buyers to prop up house prices.

This would be great if these homes could be bought without the need for selling you sole to the Government / Housing Association. It won't happen, and the sheeple will love it.

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meh, theyll most likely allow BTL barons offload theyre depriciating assets on the taxpayer and dump current rules on what constitutes a habitable dwelling.

I thought of this as soon as I saw the thread title! I can already see how the government will play it:

1) Change rules on minimum standards of social housing.

2) Spend billions in taxpayers money buying up sh*tty new build flats at 2007 prices.

3) Create some God-awful, insane arrangement whereby the govenment rents the flats back to the people they bought them from, agreeing that the original BTL owners will take any profit from the scheme, while underwriting any losses with yet more taxpayers money.

3a) Forget to include any clause in the agreement that the flats should actually be used to house council tenants....

Is this sounding plausible yet?

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It's all far to little in the day for this crock of shite. WE needed affordable housing way back to the days of the Tories, but nothing was done. Every government since i have been alive since 1967 has been a disgrace when it comes to housing. Whom owns this land called Great Britain? We all do. Why have these clunts been allowed to restrict building of affordable homes for the likes of me and you with affordable rents or house prices if you choose the buy a house? Why does a samll % still own most of the land? Did God give it to them? It is our land and our country and everyone should be afforded a roof and basic shelter, without that basic human need and right we have set our state up to fail more and more people.

Dave cameron can talk all he likes - that shite stabber will do away with inheritance tax up to a million quid and screw the likes of me and you.

he has no interst in social housing, he is only interested in making the rich more rich whilst screwing you and me.

Vote Lib dem, they deserve a chance

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Would love to see 110,000 new council homes - why didn't they think of this 10 years ago when they would have had time to implement the policy as well as the money. The Tories hate council housing and love high house prices (it benefits their middle class middle aged voters) so its sadly too little too late.

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Remember, by affordable he means via shared equity / key worker / or any other scheme that keeps the cost of houses inflated.

This way they can claim that they are providing homes for the many when they are actually using the new wave of buyers to prop up house prices.

This would be great if these homes could be bought without the need for selling you sole to the Government / Housing Association. It won't happen, and the sheeple will love it.

dont know how many will qualify for a loan these days, i have to admit i have had to take a 10K pay check and although i am keeping up payments on the very limited amount of debt i have (6K) my credit report all though minus CCJ's does not look like something anyone with a barge pole would go near. I have 3 late payments on one loan and 2 on another as well as a default on a mobile phone contract i ma slowing paying off.

Now i am being pretty honest here and will probably get flamed from the prudent, now i have just 6k worth of debt how many millions of people have the credit completley screwed because of a similair occurance? cant see many being exceptable to lenders apart from the young whom have not had a chance to get into debt yet

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110,000 New Council Homes - What Does It Mean To Prices?

Nothing. When will the half wit learn, its not the job of the government to worry about the house prices. Take care of the economy and let everything sort itself out. <_<

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I believe The Housing Corporation, funded by central Govt funds, supplied the cash for over 50,000 homes last year alone (may have been 2007)

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