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Phoney Landlords Scam Young Renters

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Newsbeat

Don't think this was posted yesterday... :unsure:

The main article is about how young (naive) renters are being conned out of money by fraudsters posing as landlords. (Makes a change from landlords posing as fraudsters I suppose).

Gives a good insight into the desperate state young people will get themselves into with property.

Twenty-three year-old Sophie moved down to London from Birmingham. But it hasn't been an easy move.

She spotted the first flat she wanted online. It looked great - two bedrooms, in a nice safe area of London and all at a bargain price of £85 per week.

There wasn't enough time to go and view it so after a few e-mails :lol: with the 'landlady' Sophie decided she trusted her enough to wire over some cash.

But £400 later, the money had gone, and so had the flat.

Sophie and her mum were more careful with her next flat

"Even after I transferred the money I was wondering if I should tell her all the details to pick it up, but I just really needed somewhere and really quick so that's why I did.

"I was really upset and kind of mostly annoyed. Looking back it's so obvious. But when you need something really quick. It's just horrible that people can do that."

Sophie was more careful with the next flat. She and her mum Sue have already been down to view it before move-in day. (Good thinking Batman!)

It's not exactly what she wanted, she'll be sharing her room with two other mates. They have a single bed and a chest of drawers each, and there's a sofa in the middle of the room. :ph34r:

"I am quite happy here and with the situation. So I don't feel like I've lost out , because in a way it's better being with your friends.

"I think ideally it would have a bit more space because there's three of us in here, but it will be fine. It'll be just like a little holiday for us so it will be quite fun." :lol:

Yes, every night you can pretend you're at the Ritz Carlton in New York!

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I don't believe it, there is a massive over supply of rooms at the moment landlords are struggling to fill rooms never mind play tenants...

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Newsbeat

Don't think this was posted yesterday... :unsure:

The main article is about how young (naive) renters are being conned out of money by fraudsters posing as landlords. (Makes a change from landlords posing as fraudsters I suppose).

Gives a good insight into the desperate state young people will get themselves into with property.

Yes, every night you can pretend you're at the Ritz Carlton in New York!

Despite the obvious fraud, it is hard to feel much sympathy with this sort of crap. I saw a piece in the Waily Dail today for which the headline said 'Facebook nearly cost me my marriage'. What that boiled down to was in fact a pathalogically insecure woman who, when a hoax message from some random alleging that they'd caught chlymidia from the lady's husband (anything to do with posting all your wedding photos on there that left you open to this, dear?) tunred up, decided that , ermm,it's true 'cos it's on the internet.

Internet fraud is easy with tubes like this about. These stories both invoke another three 'ws' though: *****, ***** *****.

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when i was first househunting in london a scam was for someone to rent a place and then try to rent it to you.. they wanted a deposit.. on sunday.. in cash... ...... .... to buy a used car! i asked for their address and postcode... they gave me a postcode that didn't match.. i said i'd report them to the police

i only knew about it as looked in two separate areas and when i asked for proof they owned the property they both said their wife has it and she lives in portugal

once was fine, but twice was coincidence. i did actually speak to a copper in the street and he told me it was a common scam

don't ever go for a flat advertised in a shop window etc. i didn't want to use an agent as they do rip you off with fees but at least you have somewhere to send the police!

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when i was first househunting in london a scam was for someone to rent a place and then try to rent it to you.. they wanted a deposit.. on sunday.. in cash... ...... .... to buy a used car! i asked for their address and postcode... they gave me a postcode that didn't match.. i said i'd report them to the police

i only knew about it as looked in two separate areas and when i asked for proof they owned the property they both said their wife has it and she lives in portugal

once was fine, but twice was coincidence. i did actually speak to a copper in the street and he told me it was a common scam

don't ever go for a flat advertised in a shop window etc. i didn't want to use an agent as they do rip you off with fees but at least you have somewhere to send the police!

Thats never happened to me and I always go private. Mind you I always look at as many places as possible and never pay cash. Bank transfer and SO only. Anyone who wants cash only is not to be trusted.

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