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Putting Energy Saving Bulb In Touch Table Lamp Light Breaks It?

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I think it's a Murray Opal Touch Table Lamp - touch its base and it goes from off to dim, bright, brighter then off again. Looks similar to this, but isn't this one: http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/room-light-table-lam...%3A1%7C294%3A50

Put an energy saving 14w bulb in it today, lamp rated for 60w.

Is it well known that putting an e/s bulb in breaks these lamps?

I've put the old conventional bulb back in because the e/s one didn't dim really, it just flickered.

But lamp now doesn't switch off any more and seems to flicker in dim mode.

So trying an e/s bulb for a few moments broke my lamp.

Or is there a way to reset it? Probably not.

Just a warning if any of you have a similar one, dont try an e/s bulb --- you'll break the lamp

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Is it well known that putting an e/s bulb in breaks these lamps?

Some CFLs can be used with a dimmer switch, but standard CFLs cannot. Normally it's the bulb you'd have to worry about, but I guess if the electronics in the lamp are cheap and nasty a surge may have damaged them.

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Guest redwine
Put an energy saving 14w bulb in it today, lamp rated for 60w.

Is it well known that putting an e/s bulb in breaks these lamps?

I've put the old conventional bulb back in because the e/s one didn't dim really, it just flickered.

But lamp now doesn't switch off any more and seems to flicker in dim mode.

So trying an e/s bulb for a few moments broke my lamp.

Or is there a way to reset it? Probably not.

Just a warning if any of you have a similar one, dont try an e/s bulb --- you'll break the lamp

energy saving bulbs are not what they are as good as they are made up to be to get decent light you need a 100W

they don't like being switched on and off alot sometimes i feel that i am sitting in the dark as they need time to heat up

they are supposed too last for up to 5 years which is not true they tend to dim after a certain time

the conventional bulb will no longer be available after 2012 they will stop making them a EU law has already been passed

an E/S bulb melted the fittings in one of my sitting room lamp shades

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Thx for the posts

LED lights are coming in the shops now, pretty expensive

I can't believe just putting a GE low energy bulb in for a few seconds stuffed the electronics in the lamp, it's appallingly badly made if it cant cope with something like that, it was a GE 20W screw (ELS) bulb, theres nothing on the lamp base to say dont use one, all it says is 60W max.

pretty p**d off, i liked that lamp + they're not cheap

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Thx for the posts

LED lights are coming in the shops now, pretty expensive

I can't believe just putting a GE low energy bulb in for a few seconds stuffed the electronics in the lamp, it's appallingly badly made if it cant cope with something like that, it was a GE 20W screw (ELS) bulb, theres nothing on the lamp base to say dont use one, all it says is 60W max.

pretty p**d off, i liked that lamp + they're not cheap

Not appallingly made at all, the two circuits both work by switching current at high frequencies. The two are not compatible at all. The lamp wants to see a constant supply, the switching unit wants to see a constant load - they would have both been switching on and off out of sync which would have resulted in some horrible spikes and then Kaput!

The circuit is designed for a purely resistive load so I doubt led lamps will fair much better tbh. It is quite expensive to make anything else and flo lamps don't like to be dimmed (shorter life) even of they are designed to do so.

Just the way the cookie crumbles I am afraid!

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Not appallingly made at all, the two circuits both work by switching current at high frequencies. The two are not compatible at all. The lamp wants to see a constant supply, the switching unit wants to see a constant load - they would have both been switching on and off out of sync which would have resulted in some horrible spikes and then Kaput!

The circuit is designed for a purely resistive load so I doubt led lamps will fair much better tbh. It is quite expensive to make anything else and flo lamps don't like to be dimmed (shorter life) even of they are designed to do so.

Just the way the cookie crumbles I am afraid!

then its appalling that they dont put a warning sticker on saying not to use low energy bulbs, it just says 60w max

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then its appalling that they dont put a warning sticker on saying not to use low energy bulbs, it just says 60w max

The warning will be on the bulb box normally.

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The warning will be on the bulb box normally.

yes the bulb box has an icon and words do not use in dimmer switches, however i'd not have made the connection that use in a dimmer on a table lamp would break the lamp, i would just have assumed that it wouldnt dim but that it would still turn on + off, of course now i know it wrecks dimmer lamps, i hope my post here prevents others from breaking their lamps in this way because most ordinary people dont know a dimming table lamp will probably be busted by putting in a e/s bulb

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Don't these low energy bulbs contain a shed load of mercury that will almost certainly result in a massive disposal issue?

They do, and it does complicate disposal, but they are reducing the amount and to put it in context, the amount of mercury in a CFL bulb, is equivalent to the amount of mercury emitted by the fossil fuels required to provide the extra energy to run the incandescent, so overall the amount of mercury released into the environment is about the same either way (assuming the CFL bulb is broken - less if not for the CFL).

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Don't these low energy bulbs contain a shed load of mercury that will almost certainly result in a massive disposal issue?

It is more an issue of safe disposal of a broken bulb in your own home. From Defra:-

Vacate the room and ventilate it for at least 15 minutes. Do not use a vacuum cleaner, but clean up using rubber gloves and aim to avoid creating and inhaling airborne dust. Sweep up all particles and glass fragments and place in a plastic bag. Wipe the area with a damp cloth, then add that to the bag and seal it. Mercury is hazardous and the bag should not be disposed of in the bin. All local councils have an obligation to make arrangements for the disposal of household hazardous waste at a civic amenity site or household waste recycling centre. The National Household Hazardous Waste Forum runs a website with details of these centres for chemicals, but which also applies to other hazardous wastes (www.chem-away.org.uk/). Alternatively contact your local council direct.

Also, try not to use these lamps at 30cm or less (i.e. desk lamps etc..) for more than an hour a day....

In October 2008 the Health Protection Agency issued precautionary advice regarding the use of certain types of CFLs in close range for periods of time over one hour. Their advice is that that open (single envelope) CFLs should not be used where people are in close proximity - closer than 30 cm or 1 ft - to the bare light bulb for over 1 hour a day. At these distances CFLs might emit Ultra Violet (UV) light at a level less than equivalent to being outside on a sunny summer’s day.

Through EU legislation, mandatory limits will ensure that all lamps will not emit UV light above safe levels from September 2009.

The European Commission’s Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks also published a report into this issue recently and this can be found on the EC website.

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they are supposed too last for up to 5 years which is not true they tend to dim after a certain time

Good point. An incandescent filament bulb outputs at a constant colour temperature until one day it simply ceases working (i.e. the filament breaks). An energy saver gradually deteriorates over time, and of course because it's gradual you tend not to notice it.

the conventional bulb will no longer be available after 2012 they will stop making them a EU law has already been passed

I suspect that people who really want them will be able to import them (from outside the EU, if necessary) via Ebay etc.

A friend who was having a run-in with the maintenance company that looked after the communal areas in his block of flats once obtained a supply of 500w bulbs (used mainly in photographers' studios and TV) and installed them in all the light fittings in the communal areas. I would have liked to have seen the maintenance company's electricity bill...

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