Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Si1

Msn Discussion: Do Public Sector Workers Get And Easy Ride?

Recommended Posts

Do public sector workers get and easy ride?

http://boards.msn.com/UKMoneyboards/thread...hreadid=1158052

To be fair - many sound like front line workers on basic wages, so it is hard to feel anything against them, and there is recognition of the middle-management-creaming culture, but quotes like:

"Pay increases for the last 3 years has been 12% an average of 4% per year."

"I've paid 6% of my wages into my pension for that period so I've earned my pension as far as I'm concerned"

..demonstrate a true degree of detachment to reality of funding their jobs and detachment from private sector issues

edits: typos

Edited by Si1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The public sector middle management is going to be in for a very rude awakening. If meetings where a sign of productivity we'd have the most efficiency public sector in the world.

A lot of the public sector is top heavy with managers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the state and public sector is very much now run for profit and revenue, rather than being holders of the public purse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The public sector middle management is going to be in for a very rude awakening. If meetings where a sign of productivity we'd have the most efficiency public sector in the world.

A lot of the public sector is top heavy with managers.

I work for a large NHS Trust and it is a truism that non-clinical management with non-jobs (Head of Reward & Information, Head of Informatics, Patient Pathway Managers etc) are rife; much to the disgruntlement of the mere plebs like my colleagues and I. To be honest, it's this lot that negatively skew the attitude towards the public sector.

Thankfully, the Trust has recently appointed a Senior Manager who was notorious at her previous Trust for being a hatchet-job. True to form and a few short months later and many of the top-tier are on their way out after failing to re-apply for their own posts. Heh heh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest happy?

Three areas which are notorious in the public sector:

Private management consultancy roles - they never seem to recommend fewer consultancies as a way of driving costs down.

Any IT system over £1million - it's always a gravy train for the IT consultancies.

Any commissioning agency - why exactly do we need a layer of tier1 local authorities telling schools and colleges how to spend money - can't someone just let the headteacher do it on their own?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Private management consultancy roles - they never seem to recommend fewer consultancies as a way of driving costs down.

If this was your job would you advise the best way to save money would be not to employ yourself in the first place?

Do you think you'd get much work? :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest absolutezero

4% a year pay rises?!

I'd love to know whcih part of the public sector they're in.

I've got 2.45% this year and 2.3% next year.

Highest I ever had was 2.5% while inflation was really running at about 5% (since I can't eat iPods and DVDs).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do public sector workers get and easy ride?

http://boards.msn.com/UKMoneyboards/thread...hreadid=1158052

To be fair - many sound like front line workers on basic wages, so it is hard to feel anything against them, and there is recognition of the middle-management-creaming culture, but quotes like:

..demonstrate a true degree of detachment to reality of funding their jobs and detachment from private sector issues

edits: typos

No - I wouldnt go back to the public sector.

My experience - public sector, no thanks, low salaries, no perks, overrated pension scheme, politics, public perception, shit working conditions

Private sector - much better money. By moving into the private sector I have increased my pay by 50% for a modest increase in hours. In the private sector I was contracted to 37 hours and probably worked 45. In the private sector I am contracted to 40 and work about 45-48.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest happy?
If this was your job would you advise the best way to save money would be not to employ yourself in the first place?

Do you think you'd get much work? :P

"I've been through the figures, worked costings for the next five years, and can confidently conclude that the best way to make efficiency gains is to not employ me or my crooked city friends ever again. We're all a bunch of crooks who've been taking the taxpayer to the cleaners."

Never going to happen is it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No - I wouldnt go back to the public sector.

My experience - public sector, no thanks, low salaries, no perks, overrated pension scheme, politics, public perception, shit working conditions

Private sector - much better money. By moving into the private sector I have increased my pay by 50% for a modest increase in hours. In the private sector I was contracted to 37 hours and probably worked 45. In the private sector I am contracted to 40 and work about 45-48.

is your new post in private consulting for the public sector - or truly independent of the public sector?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4% a year pay rises?!

I'd love to know whcih part of the public sector they're in.

I've got 2.45% this year and 2.3% next year.

Highest I ever had was 2.5% while inflation was really running at about 5% (since I can't eat iPods and DVDs).

When in the public sector I was lucky to get 2% a year and earnt about 18-22k. Doing the exact same job in the private sector (with a mixture of public and private sector clients) I earn nearly twice that and average 3 days a week work.

I do get a bit annoyed with my friends/family who work in the civil service in London and seem to swap between non-jobs every 6 months getting big payrises and non-contributory pensions and spend all their time moaning about how hard done by they are compared to the public sector.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4% a year pay rises?!

I'd love to know whcih part of the public sector they're in.

I've got 2.45% this year and 2.3% next year.

Highest I ever had was 2.5% while inflation was really running at about 5% (since I can't eat iPods and DVDs).

Most people in the private sector are taking pay cuts.

Oh well, bankers yesterday, MPs today, tomorrow could be public sector workers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Most people in the private sector are taking pay cuts.

Oh well, bankers yesterday, MPs today, tomorrow could be public sector workers.

But in the good times a lot of private sector workers got bonuses - swings and roundabouts....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doubt many people could cope with the cr*p teachers doctors nurses policemen ambulance men etc have to put up with dealing with the lowlife in this country - or fighting in Afghanistan. Public sector workers have it easy eh :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Doubt many people could cope with the cr*p teachers doctors nurses policemen ambulance men etc have to put up with dealing with the lowlife in this country - or fighting in Afghanistan. Public sector workers have it easy eh :lol:

I bet there's plenty in the dole queue who'll give it a crack. The Forces have had a huge application surge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But in the good times a lot of private sector workers got bonuses - swings and roundabouts....

Some may have but, many in ordinary jobs did not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If this was your job would you advise the best way to save money would be not to employ yourself in the first place?

Do you think you'd get much work? :P

consulting.jpg

so true.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In local government many staff are in the process of suffering severe cuts in pay under a pay and regrading review. For example council tax officers who deal face-to-face, or on the telephone, with people who are angry at receiving summons used to get £21,000 per year and finding their pay is being cut to £16,600. The grief people get from in this job is not worth £16,600. Most of the council clerical jobs are suffering similar pay cuts and yet those on £45,000 plus a year in in their council jobs were not subject to a pay and regrading review and will have no pay cuts. Staff still get a final salary pension scheme and may have paid in for years at a percentage of the higher salary and, now finding, for example, their pension will be based on their new salary of £16,600 instead of their old salary of £21,000.

In recent years ordinary staff have to wait 9 or months to receive a inflation pay increase of 2 -2.4% and yet a chief executive will get and annual pay increase of 6% and he will get that on April and not have to wait until Novmember like his or her staff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In local government many staff are in the process of suffering severe cuts in pay under a pay and regrading review. For example council tax officers who deal face-to-face, or on the telephone, with people who are angry at receiving summons used to get £21,000 per year and finding their pay is being cut to £16,600. The grief people get from in this job is not worth £16,600. Most of the council clerical jobs are suffering similar pay cuts and yet those on £45,000 plus a year in in their council jobs were not subject to a pay and regrading review and will have no pay cuts. Staff still get a final salary pension scheme and may have paid in for years at a percentage of the higher salary and, now finding, for example, their pension will be based on their new salary of £16,600 instead of their old salary of £21,000.

In recent years ordinary staff have to wait 9 or months to receive a inflation pay increase of 2 -2.4% and yet a chief executive will get and annual pay increase of 6% and he will get that on April and not have to wait until Novmember like his or her staff.

Is it possible to make a sub-atomic particle sized violin?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Isn't that Madelson technique bash the people you are arguing with while not having any debate.

The argument keeps coming back to the wrong people are getting cut. I may agree, to some extent, with this. However, you can't get away from the fact that cuts must be made. Eventually the axe will fall on the big salary middle management and pretend CEOs that local authorities have appointed in their Wendy House version of business.

Regardless of this, it is utterly pointless having each council printing and mailing council tax and rates bills and then collecting the money and administering them locally. They could all be despatched centrally with a national helpline and loads of jobs could be cut. The money saved could then be used to reduce the council tax bill. Although, I obviously doubt this would be the case in reality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
is your new post in private consulting for the public sector - or truly independent of the public sector?

Employed - FTSE 250 Hotels/ Pubs / Restaurant chain.

Previously Private Equity - care sector

Prior to that Interim Management / Consultancy in 3 mid sized public companies plus local taxi firm :lol:

Not a penny of my income comes from the public sector. Last money I got from the taxpayer was end of March 2009 by doing a few weeks inspection work for a LA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In local government many staff are in the process of suffering severe cuts in pay under a pay and regrading review. For example council tax officers who deal face-to-face, or on the telephone, with people who are angry at receiving summons used to get £21,000 per year and finding their pay is being cut to £16,600. The grief people get from in this job is not worth £16,600. Most of the council clerical jobs are suffering similar pay cuts and yet those on £45,000 plus a year in in their council jobs were not subject to a pay and regrading review and will have no pay cuts. Staff still get a final salary pension scheme and may have paid in for years at a percentage of the higher salary and, now finding, for example, their pension will be based on their new salary of £16,600 instead of their old salary of £21,000.

In recent years ordinary staff have to wait 9 or months to receive a inflation pay increase of 2 -2.4% and yet a chief executive will get and annual pay increase of 6% and he will get that on April and not have to wait until Novmember like his or her staff.

LG went over to average salary pension funds in April 2008. This is based upon a contribution by the employer of 8% and the employee 6-7%

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another public versus private sector thread. We haven't had one of those for - let's see - about 40 minutes.

If you want job security in bad times and comparatively poor wage rises in good times, join the public sector. If you want comparatively nice wage rises in good times and job worries during recessions, join the private sector.

Edited by Danny Deflation

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest happy?
Another public versus private sector thread. We haven't had one of those for - let's see - about 40 minutes.

Whichever way they try and dress it up, it's not about private versus public - it's about pension envy.

Edited by happy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   296 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.