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Post Your Favourite Charts Here


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G7 Nations Short Term Debt (above)

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G7 Nations Debt (above)

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Cost of mortgage per £1k given interest rate and term (above)

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And although not strictly a chart, it is one of my favourites (above)

Edited: pictures didn't appear + gave explanation of some charts

Edited by Scott
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My charts paint a very bullish picture.

And which country were they for?

Ah, looks like Australia!

Mmm, I could have sworn this was .co.uk.

Edited: Answered my own question as couldn't be bothered to wait for the reply!

Edited by Scott
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This little chart shows how volatile building land is. In the nineties crash, which showed as pretty subdued in the indices, straining your eyes at this little chart, it looks like land prices went from an index of just under 40 at the peak, to about 10 at the bottom, so approximately a 75% drop!

It is likely to be even higher this time with such a steep crash. IMO that's what to buy at the bottom.

I *think* you may be reading the chart wrong. It says everything is rebased to 1983=100, and i think the vertical scale is points above that so maybe land prices fell from 140 to 110.

The chart isnt very clear though, maybe it had annotations to go with it?

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I *think* you may be reading the chart wrong. It says everything is rebased to 1983=100, and i think the vertical scale is points above that so maybe land prices fell from 140 to 110.

The chart isnt very clear though, maybe it had annotations to go with it?

You are correct. But it looks to me that land prices need to fall about 60% on that chart and the cost of building a house needs to fall by about a third, to get back to long term average growth. Now let's say that land is 40% of the cost of an overall price of a house for my example.

So, if a house sells for £100k and there is a plot of land for sale next to it that is the same size, the land would currently be on the market for £40k (with planning permission). And the cost to build the house would be £50k (allowing for a 10% profit for the housebuilder).

Now that land cost needs to fall 60%, so its £24k at the bottom of the crash. And the house build also needs to drop by one third, bringing that to £33k. The builder takes 10% profit, making it £62,700.

A drop of 37.8%.

These are worked on guesstimate amounts for the land percentage, housebuild percentage and housebuilder profit margin, so feel free to correct me on those.

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BTW, great topic Confounded. Mods - this really should be pinned.

PS No charts from the bulls yet!

Thanks guys for all your charts, Scott I think your signature chart is all you need regarding UK house prices, included in my originals and one of the most graphic charts regarding the distortion from income that this excessive credit bubble caused.

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Well you better just stick to the US and other non UK charts on here then.

I think it is relevant when talking about UK house prices to look at UK House related charts and worldwide economic charts as they have a bearing on everything.

To use an Australian house price chart as a bull exercise on UK house prices is pretty irrelevant, as is using any other countries house price chart in a bearish or bullish manner (even though they may be interesting and could potentially offer an insight into where we are going).

I'm happy for you if you are bullish on Aussie house prices. Personally I couldn't care less whether they fall or rise. Makes no difference to me as I don't want to live there.

Apologies if I was being flippant but your chart didn't have anything to do with UK house prices just as US ones don't either!

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I haven’t checked the entire thread to see if these alarming (US) charts have been posted, but OMG - green shoots anyone! Economic Policy Institute

Highest unemployment rate since 1983

by Heidi Shierholz and Lawrence Mishel

This recession has become the longest and deepest economic downturn since the Great Depression. We now have data covering 17 months of the recession. In order to see how this recession stacks up against previous post-war recessions, we compare labor market indicators at the start of recessions to their values 16 months later. This document will be updated on July 10 to reflect new June data.

Jobs-Day-Teaser_Figure_A.jpgJobs-Day-Teaser_Figure_B.jpgJobs-Day-Teaser_Figure_C.jpgJobs-Day-Teaser_Figure_D.jpgJobs-Day-Teaser_Figure_E.jpg edit-link correct chart

Edited by Captain Cavey
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