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Beer Priming - Natural Carbonation?

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brewing at home

-------------------

rather than put the fizz in (once the natural fizz subsides) by c02 bulbs, anyone tell me how to do the natural priming method which i think is adding malt or sugar once the beer is already at an advanced or finished / clarified stage?? cant find a website that clearly explains it, they make it sound complicated

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Guest Skinty
brewing at home

-------------------

rather than put the fizz in (once the natural fizz subsides) by c02 bulbs, anyone tell me how to do the natural priming method which i think is adding malt or sugar once the beer is already at an advanced or finished / clarified stage?? cant find a website that clearly explains it, they make it sound complicated

I used to do this for barrels. I would pour all the newly fermented beer into the barrel and just before closing the lid I would throw in a teaspoon or tablespoon of sugar. This produces just enough carbon dioxide to help dispel some of the oxygen in the gap between the beer and the lid at the top and thus helps get rid of environmental microbes and reduces the chance of the beer becoming infected.

Secondary fermentation will still continue anyway, the spoon of sugar was just to give it a kick start.

I only used to do this once, just before storing the beer away to mature for a month or so.

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I used to do this for barrels. I would pour all the newly fermented beer into the barrel and just before closing the lid I would throw in a teaspoon or tablespoon of sugar. This produces just enough carbon dioxide to help dispel some of the oxygen in the gap between the beer and the lid at the top and thus helps get rid of environmental microbes and reduces the chance of the beer becoming infected.

Secondary fermentation will still continue anyway, the spoon of sugar was just to give it a kick start.

I only used to do this once, just before storing the beer away to mature for a month or so.

thats so nice + clear to understand, why cant other websites write straightforward like that? thx very much skinty

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Guest Skinty

My pleasure.

I was home brewing back in the early 90's and didn't have an internet connection. I found the following book to be extremely useful and told me everything I needed to know.

http://www.alibris.co.uk/search/books/qwor...20Camra%20Guide

I can't find it on amazon but this looks like the nearest equivalent. It's by the same author.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Camra-Guide-Brewin...0268&sr=1-4

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My pleasure.

I was home brewing back in the early 90's and didn't have an internet connection. I found the following book to be extremely useful and told me everything I needed to know.

http://www.alibris.co.uk/search/books/qwor...20Camra%20Guide

I can't find it on amazon but this looks like the nearest equivalent. It's by the same author.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Camra-Guide-Brewin...0268&sr=1-4

thx again :)

If you're bottling it just mix in 80-90grms of sugar into the barrel then put it in the bottles.

thx for that additional tip, will do :)

( 'cause i'm a bit fed up paying for co2 bulbs, it adds up :lol: )

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I used to do this for barrels. I would pour all the newly fermented beer into the barrel and just before closing the lid I would throw in a teaspoon or tablespoon of sugar. This produces just enough carbon dioxide to help dispel some of the oxygen in the gap between the beer and the lid at the top and thus helps get rid of environmental microbes and reduces the chance of the beer becoming infected.

Secondary fermentation will still continue anyway, the spoon of sugar was just to give it a kick start.

I only used to do this once, just before storing the beer away to mature for a month or so.

Tops! A bird who knows how to brew beer - woman of my dreams. If you ever find yourself on the market again ;)

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Thx all for the help, enjoying a beer right now as some of you can probably guess from my radio rant above --

the one in the pic is today's finished* brew (a day early really but i cant notice the difference) and is canadian red in the beer machine in my fridge. it really is nice, i think i could get sick of the canadian red flavour but its very more-ish at the moment... :)

Hapy midsummers day all, oops i completely forgot to get down to stonehenge for 5am ;)

beermidsummer09.jpg

*as in mature enough to enjoy!

post-20211-1245584372_thumb.jpg

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brewing at home

-------------------

rather than put the fizz in (once the natural fizz subsides) by c02 bulbs, anyone tell me how to do the natural priming method which i think is adding malt or sugar once the beer is already at an advanced or finished / clarified stage?? cant find a website that clearly explains it, they make it sound complicated

Making your own beer is a great way to save a lot of money, and you can take pride in pouring a good pint for your mates when you get a good batch. There are so many variables which will affect the outcome, and its very personal journey.

It's pretty easy really, but if you go this route you will end up with sediment in the bottles. Not a big issue, but it means that you will have to pour it carefully or your mates will ask what the floaters are in their drinks.

I would get the beer out of the carboy by syphon, into the individual bottle. Glass is preferable, but plastic is ok too, just insure that you can make a good seal. Glass of course lets you use a bottle cap and is also infinitely reusable if you are careful.

Next, I would add a teaspoon of sugar. THis is where you get to decide the outcome, as there are many types of sugar to use. Most of the time I would use corn sugar, but cane is fine. These will give you a different taste.

The only real problems occur when you store the bottles incorrectly.Proper temperature control and NO SUNLIGHT will make a tasty batch.

I probably had about 3-4 bad batches when I first started out, and its a bit of a learning curve. Make sure you get a hydrometer and learn how to use it!

I found these videos: Fermenting Home Brewed Scottish Beer

EDIT: His method is different from mine, and actually probably a lot easier. But as I said, its a personal journey.

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Making your own beer is a great way to save a lot of money, and you can take pride in pouring a good pint for your mates when you get a good batch. There are so many variables which will affect the outcome, and its very personal journey.

It's pretty easy really, but if you go this route you will end up with sediment in the bottles. Not a big issue, but it means that you will have to pour it carefully or your mates will ask what the floaters are in their drinks.

I would get the beer out of the carboy by syphon, into the individual bottle. Glass is preferable, but plastic is ok too, just insure that you can make a good seal. Glass of course lets you use a bottle cap and is also infinitely reusable if you are careful.

Next, I would add a teaspoon of sugar. THis is where you get to decide the outcome, as there are many types of sugar to use. Most of the time I would use corn sugar, but cane is fine. These will give you a different taste.

The only real problems occur when you store the bottles incorrectly.Proper temperature control and NO SUNLIGHT will make a tasty batch.

I probably had about 3-4 bad batches when I first started out, and its a bit of a learning curve. Make sure you get a hydrometer and learn how to use it!

I found these videos: Fermenting Home Brewed Scottish Beer

EDIT: His method is different from mine, and actually probably a lot easier. But as I said, its a personal journey.

thx c-i-m

Wilkinsons dont do proper beer yeast at my branch so i had to get it mail order - Youngs yeast, for me cheap but v good, wilkinsons also does a £2 syphon kit, beer machine people charge much more than that for their syphon, so if anyone here's thinking of buying the beer machine get the bottling kit model as its just a few quid more from new but i think 15 to 20 quid more later (if you can even find one) or get the wilkinson syphon which doesnt have the bracket but doesnt bother me

some wilkinsons have a youngs complete beer (no storage barrel tho) kit for £20 at the moment, looks ok, much cheaper than the beer machine and maybe same good results

i have to stop drinking now, rate i'm going the whole lot will be gone by 4 !

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