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Hauliers Protest About Petrol Prices


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Personally ive always thought they should be banned from the motorways during rush hour. Would make a big difference to congestion.

Wouldn't make one scrap of difference in the South. People think the middle lane is for driving (thus a 3 laner is now a two laner) and if you have a 'fast/special/big/expensive/new' car you are allowed to sit in the outside lane and set the pace there as well.

It's completely off-topic and I suggest we take it there if people want a debate, but teaching people lane discipline will increase capacity by 20-30% IMHO.

TFH

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A 44 tonne lorry, fully loaded, travelling a distance of 150 miles doing 8 or 9 mpg, is efficient. But if it does the return journey empty, that blows away the efficiency even if it does use a bit less fuel when running unladen.

I think we need a more co-ordinated road haulage industry consisting of a smaller number of big players.

The problem is of course that as you tend towards the smaller number of larger players you get the situation where one player being out of action for any reason means that a lot of your capacity is gone at once. Of course taken to extremes you get a monopoly or nearly so, just thing back to the days before airline deregulation when the likes of British Airways and Aer Lingus owned the skies and could charge what they liked.

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Personally ive always thought they should be banned from the motorways during rush hour. Would make a big difference to congestion.

That would make some sense. Another thing that would help a lot in urban areas would be to only allow shop deliveries, where the truck has to park on the street, between say 8:00pm and 06:00am.

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That would make some sense. Another thing that would help a lot in urban areas would be to only allow shop deliveries, where the truck has to park on the street, between say 8:00pm and 06:00am.

As long as the shops are open that would work, and the driver and his mate can work in the near dark unloading goods

then leave them on the street and not get fined for it.

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As long as the shops are open that would work, and the driver and his mate can work in the near dark unloading goods

then leave them on the street and not get fined for it.

We make the majority of deliveries at night. Good for public health and safety and good travelling time, but bad for drivers.

Most stores have a special buffer room constructed at the back that the driver can access to leave roll cages in but, he/she can't access the rest of the store.

All retailers are mad not to do the same in my view. Only downside is the trucks not being mobile advertisng boards during the day.

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You could argue the same of imports from china - we should only be able to send the containers back when they're buying stuff off us.

Before the crash we used to fill them with waste card and plastic bales to send back.

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and a lot of us regretted that we didn't carry it on until there was a major impact- the first deaths from starvation in the UK for 500 years for example

Seems like killing people comes easily to truckers. Not content with thinning out the ranks of prostitutes, killing around 600 a year in accidents (far out of proportion compared to cars to miles driven) and deaths caused by particulates and poor air quality - 1000s a year, now they regret not starving us.

Thanks.

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Just market the opportunity as a 'traditional canal boat holiday' and people will pay to crew it.

Is there no technology to make barges faster and with auto-navigation or summat? Robot driven? I can still remember my old Dad's words in the 60's when Beeching was in full swing with his axe. He said "you watch-they will end up reopening them". The old rail system was just brilliant. Inefficient, cost a fortune but brilliant. My little town of 20,000 people had two stations-north and south. A journey was an adventure, every time. I never ever got sick of travelling by rail. Wonder how many kids think the same of the M1?

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But that's not "park on the street" , that's supermarket and warehouse deliveries. Multiple Drop

high street or street will involve shops, pubs, bars, cafes etc.

No, includes a lot of sub 2000sqft inner-city/Central London/high st deliveries where parking is on the street outside or even the pavement. Multi-drop, very few stores take a whole trailer often up to half a dozen drops per trailer.

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Seems like killing people comes easily to truckers. Not content with thinning out the ranks of prostitutes, killing around 600 a year in accidents (far out of proportion compared to cars to miles driven) and deaths caused by particulates and poor air quality - 1000s a year, now they regret not starving us.

Thanks.

Have you got figures to back that up. I'm pretty sure genuine UK HGV drivers do not have nearly as many accidents per mile as car drivers. Any collision involving a 44ton truck is obviously more likely to be fatal though.

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Have you got figures to back that up. I'm pretty sure genuine UK HGV drivers do not have nearly as many accidents per mile as car drivers. Any collision involving a 44ton truck is obviously more likely to be fatal though.

And the fact is that anyone, driver or cyclist, who goes up along the left side of a truck at a junction must have a death wish. People never seem to realise that if you can't see the driver in his mirror he can't see you.

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No, includes a lot of sub 2000sqft inner-city/Central London/high st deliveries where parking is on the street outside or even the pavement. Multi-drop, very few stores take a whole trailer often up to half a dozen drops per trailer.

:huh:

I think that's what I thought as well, they don't have loading bays. KFC, McDonalds, Spar, Co-OP, Cafe Nero, Starbucks,

Pubs, independent shops, electrical retailers, the high street, clothes shops etc etc you park on the street in a 7.5Ton

and unload then move to the next drop.

Supermarkets you queue up or go straight in and they have a loading bay.

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Have you got figures to back that up. I'm pretty sure genuine UK HGV drivers do not have nearly as many accidents per mile as car drivers. Any collision involving a 44ton truck is obviously more likely to be fatal though.

The last time I saw the figures, an HGV was less than half as likely to be involved in an accident per vehicle kilometre as a car.

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And the fact is that anyone, driver or cyclist, who goes up along the left side of a truck at a junction must have a death wish. People never seem to realise that if you can't see the driver in his mirror he can't see you.

The majority of people who complain about the way truck drivers drive are usually just attracting attention to their own poor driving.

They fail to read the road ahead and anticipate and assess why another vehicle is manoeuvring in the way it is.

Another example, other than the need of large vehicles to make wide turns, is that at small sections of dual carriageway trucks will pull into the inside lane, even though at the junction they need to turn right, they do this to allow traffic held up behind to pass. You then get some idiot who then doesn't allow the truck to pull back in at the junction and thinks they've been cut up.

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And you think it would be realistic for Tesco to switch to this means of distribution?

Tesco are actually now shipping their wine from the docks in Liverpool to their regional distribution hub in Manchester by canal, seriously! I guess for goods which aren't perishable and for certain routes (i.e. not to your local store) its not a bad idea.

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The last time I saw the figures, an HGV was less than half as likely to be involved in an accident per vehicle kilometre as a car.

Yep, thought it was the case, thought their post smelt like bullsh1t but wasn't 100% certain.

Edited by Soon Not a Chain Retailer
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Yep, thought it was the case, thought their post smelt like bullsh1t but wasn't 100% certain.

Are you not going to ask him to back this up?

Or do you only ask people that you disagree with to back up their statements?

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I'm a greenie but I have a lot of sympathy with Harry Monk, our family business used to be haulage until Tescos forced it under by not paying their bills. Grrrrr.... However I can't help but think there is an element of Upton Sinclair to some of your arguments Harry i.e. “If is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it†- I do think road haulage is likely to be a dying industry purely in the light of peak oil and a general downturn in the UK's standard of living, poor folk don't buy as much! I think the next 20 years will be very interesting for the industry and in a way haulage represents a bell-weather for the UK as a whole. Also as stated by another poster, as a cyclist I have never felt threatened by HGVs, perhaps I give them more respect as I know they could squish me like a knat in their blind spot, but generally they are very well driven. Buses on the otherhand seem to be crewed by neanderthal bike haters.... whose good idea was it to put the most and least vulnerable road users in the same lane?!!

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Tesco are actually now shipping their wine from the docks in Liverpool to their regional distribution hub in Manchester by canal, seriously! I guess for goods which aren't perishable and for certain routes (i.e. not to your local store) its not a bad idea.

But only the tiniest fraction of freight could ever be moved by canal. The lifestyle we lived in the canal age was incredibly frugal compared to the life we live in the 21st Century.

For anyone who doesn't like trucks, the answer is blindingly simple- stop buying things.

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For anyone who doesn't like trucks, the answer is blindingly simple- stop buying things.

And what should strike the fear of God into truckers is that due to the drying up of credit, people appear to be doing just that! I wonder how much of the freight on the road is for 'discretionary' purchases and how much for staples? Any clues Harry?

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Are you not going to ask him to back this up?

Or do you only ask people that you disagree with to back up their statements?

The 'killing people comes easily to truckers' opening rhetoric already meant I was fairly certain it was an emotion based, fact free contribution.

I'm a greenie but I have a lot of sympathy with Harry Monk, our family business used to be haulage until Tescos forced it under by not paying their bills. Grrrrr.... However I can't help but think there is an element of Upton Sinclair to some of your arguments Harry i.e. “If is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it†- I do think road haulage is likely to be a dying industry purely in the light of peak oil and a general downturn in the UK's standard of living, poor folk don't buy as much! I think the next 20 years will be very interesting for the industry and in a way haulage represents a bell-weather for the UK as a whole. Also as stated by another poster, as a cyclist I have never felt threatened by HGVs, perhaps I give them more respect as I know they could squish me like a knat in their blind spot, but generally they are very well driven. Buses on the otherhand seem to be crewed by neanderthal bike haters.... whose good idea was it to put the most and least vulnerable road users in the same lane?!!

I can't see it changing from large amounts of goods being moved by road haulage for a good while yet. There may be experiments with electric and other alternatives to diesel. Thus far, any alternatives proposed are, for the time being, impractical and clearly unaffordable.

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And what should strike the fear of God into truckers is that due to the drying up of credit, people appear to be doing just that! I wonder how much of the freight on the road is for 'discretionary' purchases and how much for staples? Any clues Harry?

A lot of trucks on the road are reefers so food is always going to demand a substantial truck fleet.

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  • 442 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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