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Collectables & Antiques Prices Dropping Off Sharply? Looks Like It.

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my own experience shows me things are not shifting, but take this example, lets see what happens...

Clarice Cliff Bizarre Windbells conical sugar shaker, 2004 book price £400 to £450 ..... currently on eBay with a seller for £275 http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Clarice-Cliff-A-Vint...%3A1%7C294%3A50

I can upload a copy of the book page showing the price before if the mods allow.

Some CC conical sugar shakers such as a c 1930 Orange Erin have been in the book at £3000 !

I've been monitoring a number of items, I'm seeing prices well, well down on usual prices in previous years. Sometimes ridiculously so.

Green shoots? Not where I'm standing. my own stuff which would normally sell at £5 to £10 not even fetching 99p in most cases now.

Perhaps antique buyers were buying before as a hedge, but are they still? ..or are they now waiting for even better bargains?

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my own experience shows me things are not shifting, but take this example, lets see what happens...

Clarice Cliff Bizarre Windbells conical sugar shaker, 2004 book price £400 to £450 ..... currently on eBay with a seller for £275 http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Clarice-Cliff-A-Vint...%3A1%7C294%3A50

I can upload a copy of the book page showing the price before if the mods allow.

Some CC conical sugar shakers such as a c 1930 Orange Erin have been in the book at £3000 !

I've been monitoring a number of items, I'm seeing prices well, well down on usual prices in previous years. Sometimes ridiculously so.

Green shoots? Not where I'm standing. my own stuff which would normally sell at £5 to £10 not even fetching 99p in most cases now.

Perhaps antique buyers were buying before as a hedge, but are they still? ..or are they now waiting for even better bargains?

Antiques and the lower end of the Art market have been in decline for a long time though - quite simply the people are not there who buy/collect this stuff anymore - the middle-age demographic is no longer interested in that stuff to the extent that their parents were...

The high end is quite a different matter though.

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Guest joeschmo
Antiques and the lower end of the Art market have been in decline for a long time though - quite simply the people are not there who buy/collect this stuff anymore ...

The high end is quite a different matter though.

Dear old Clarice would turn in her grave if she heard herself refered to as "lower end" :o

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Dear old Clarice would turn in her grave if she heard herself refered to as "lower end" :o

Lol - quite true !

To my mind the peak for Clarice Cliff pottery price and interest wise was during the late 80`s - the total collapse of the export market to the USA has not been helpful either ...

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Antiques and the lower end of the Art market have been in decline for a long time though - quite simply the people are not there who buy/collect this stuff anymore - the middle-age demographic is no longer interested in that stuff to the extent that their parents were...

The high end is quite a different matter though.

my point though is CC was valued at those figures by Millers etc just a few years ago.

so were the buyers of lower end antiques and collectables just a passing fad then? what years would you pinpoint as its start and notable demise? what do you think the younger generation will collect, apart from knife blades and asbos? any tips appreciated.

definitely just a few years ago many of the items in my collection that i'm selling (rare-ish LPs, ornaments, prints, glassware etc) would have sold for £5 to £10. not riches but money when you have a good few. now most failed to reach even 99p and have gone to my favourite charity shops.

Dear old Clarice would turn in her grave if she heard herself refered to as "lower end" :o

:)

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so were the buyers of lower end antiques and collectables just a passing fad then? what years would you pinpoint as its start and notable demise? what do you think the younger generation will collect, apart from knife blades and asbos? any tips appreciated.

definitely just a few years ago many of the items in my collection that i'm selling (rare-ish LPs, ornaments, prints, glassware etc) would have sold for £5 to £10. not riches but money when you have a good few. now most failed to reach even 99p and have gone to my favourite charity shops.

:)

Bit hard to call what was a constituent part of the British retail economy a passing fad but certainly the number of Antique and collectable shops on the High St have been declining for quite some time .

Still reckon the peak time for this stuff was during the 80`s but seen that was the only time I was involved and it`s a long time ago it is probably unfair for me to comment .

I suspect the growth of IKEA and the home decor revolution which that has engendered has not been helpful to folk selling Antiques either .

The Sugar Shifter you featured on e-bay has £275 as a starting bid on a item which has 6 days to run so it could go for a lot more - it also has some repair damage .

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Guest redwine
my point though is CC was valued at those figures by Millers etc just a few years ago.

so were the buyers of lower end antiques and collectables just a passing fad then? what years would you pinpoint as its start and notable demise? what do you think the younger generation will collect, apart from knife blades and asbos? any tips appreciated.

definitely just a few years ago many of the items in my collection that i'm selling (rare-ish LPs, ornaments, prints, glassware etc) would have sold for £5 to £10. not riches but money when you have a good few. now most failed to reach even 99p and have gone to my favourite charity shops.

:)

there was an antiques boom over here in france i would say that it started in the late 90s but fizzeled out around about 2006

all of a sudden every town and village had there "brocante" or car boot voir jumble sale all of the old stuff came out of the cellers

tv would report that someone had found a "picasso" and became rich etc

then the problems started as antique dealers were complaining that people didnt buy in there shops anymore as they were out buying off street sellers

i think that it died due to "overkill"

asfor the "brocantes" they still contnue today but they are what i call "rubbish sales" literally

people seem to only go there for something to do on a sunday

nobody seem to buy anything and sellers dont seem to sell anything

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Bit hard to call what was a constituent part of the British retail economy a passing fad but certainly the number of Antique and collectable shops on the High St have been declining for quite some time .

Still reckon the peak time for this stuff was during the 80`s but seen that was the only time I was involved and it`s a long time ago it is probably unfair for me to comment .

I suspect the growth of IKEA and the home decor revolution which that has engendered has not been helpful to folk selling Antiques either .

The Sugar Shifter you featured on e-bay has £275 as a starting bid on a item which has 6 days to run so it could go for a lot more - it also has some repair damage .

I think the one in the price guide book is a restored one. There are others on ebay not of that rare pattern but going at £25 near auction end, a few years ago unheard of.

The Harry Enfield 'antique' shop sketches where any old tat goes for thousands to aspiring misguided customers was more recent than the 80s, probably late 90s.

there was an antiques boom over here in france i would say that it started in the late 90s but fizzeled out around about 2006

all of a sudden every town and village had there "brocante" or car boot voir jumble sale all of the old stuff came out of the cellers

tv would report that someone had found a "picasso" and became rich etc

then the problems started as antique dealers were complaining that people didnt buy in there shops anymore as they were out buying off street sellers

i think that it died due to "overkill"

asfor the "brocantes" they still contnue today but they are what i call "rubbish sales" literally

people seem to only go there for something to do on a sunday

nobody seem to buy anything and sellers dont seem to sell anything

the antique fayres i've been to as a buyer seem very quiet with dealers offering discounts without even asking them, when they look up from their library book or knitting

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Antiques and the lower end of the Art market have been in decline for a long time though - quite simply the people are not there who buy/collect this stuff anymore - the middle-age demographic is no longer interested in that stuff to the extent that their parents were...

The high end is quite a different matter though.

Maybe, although Sotheby's and Christies have been and still are laying of swathes of their workforces.

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Modern living seems to be minimalist, uncluttered and with rooms dominated by a sofa, a big plasma and one vase with a few curly twigs in it.

I think collecting anything (other than dvd's) will become a very, very minority pursuit.

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Nowadays people don't want/need nic nacks and cluttering tat, they want to be free from the worthless rubbish that surrounds them....true wealth is not that china ornament or pretty picture. ;)

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Guest redwine
Modern living seems to be minimalist, uncluttered and with rooms dominated by a sofa, a big plasma and one vase with a few curly twigs in it.

I think collecting anything (other than dvd's) will become a very, very minority pursuit.

i think that collecting is a "passion" i remember collecting subbuteo football teams i was really into it looking for "huddersfield town" or "hartlepool utd"

its just a hobby nothing to do with making money you are looking for something and you have to find it

nothing more than a harmless hobby but good fun when your a kid with little or no money

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i think that collecting is a "passion" i remember collecting subbuteo football teams i was really into it looking for "huddersfield town" or "hartlepool utd"

its just a hobby nothing to do with making money you are looking for something and you have to find it

nothing more than a harmless hobby but good fun when your a kid with little or no money

I used to collect china cats and was convinced they would one day be worth a fortune, the more purrfect they were the more I believed they were worth, the more rare they were the more I believed people would pay for them...after years of dusting them and polishing them and looking at them I decided I no longer wanted them so I tried to sell them, but no one wanted to pay the price I thought they were worth...so I took what I was offered and have never looked back. ;)

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Modern living seems to be minimalist, uncluttered and with rooms dominated by a sofa, a big plasma and one vase with a few curly twigs in it.

I think collecting anything (other than dvd's) will become a very, very minority pursuit.

thats true

Nowadays people don't want/need nic nacks and cluttering tat, they want to be free from the worthless rubbish that surrounds them....true wealth is not that china ornament or pretty picture. ;)

some of them are living in worthless rubbish, they are yet to find that out,

certainly the charity shops have more collections on sale than before, usually no fast takers unless mega cheap.

myself i collect bits of paper with a hologram and the queen's head on pref saying 50

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Modern living seems to be minimalist, uncluttered and with rooms dominated by a sofa, a big plasma and one vase with a few curly twigs in it.

I think collecting anything (other than dvd's) will become a very, very minority pursuit.

i think that collecting is a "passion" i remember collecting subbuteo football teams i was really into it looking for "huddersfield town" or "hartlepool utd"

its just a hobby nothing to do with making money you are looking for something and you have to find it

nothing more than a harmless hobby but good fun when your a kid with little or no money

IMHO proper collecting is going and not coming back, other than at the very top end.

There are many reasons for this, to throw a few out:

"Instant" collectibles - as peddled by QVC, buy all the rings in a set. You get them all without leaving your armchair and they are made new to order.

Kids' instant collectables - I collected stamps. Now you can buy the characters off a TV show and play with them. It's less interesting but more fun.

Cheap animated objects - when you can buy and interact with a Wii, Laptop, electronic game etc. then some coins or medals aren't going to be that compelling.

Loss of aesethic sense - if you don't stop and really look at something, just glance at it, then a nice looking vase from matalan serves the same purpose as a genuine art deco object

Loss of front rooms and glass fronted cabinets - when I were a lad everybody's grandparents had display items set out in a formal room. My parents' generation had lost that front room and the display items with them.

Smaller houses - nowhere to put the stuff.

Mobile society - people move more and accumulate less. On one move the chap helping me asked why I had so many books. I asked myself the same! If I'd only moved once I would have accumulated more.

When I saw some toy train collectors on James May's show they were all old men who had played with trains when they were younger and kept that interest going. Can't see that happening with video games, people want the latest edition every time.

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Guest redwine

i think that collecting starts for most people when they are kids most kids even today like to collect something but then they grow out of it

video games nintendo,playstation etc aren't collectables once you have played a game you get rid of it and buy another

and they tend to be more for the dark winter nights not like now when kids are outside

Antiques always was and still is a up-market world a bit like "classic cars" they are still collected but you need lots of money this still goes on today

people do buy gold coins of another generation readers of "mags" like "peoples friend"etc

most familys do have objects in there homes that they may have bought in an antiques shop or on holidays

as you said smaller houses limit your space so you can't buy much of this stuff therefore it has become a very small market for a seller

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was at 3 boot this morn

- hobbyist stall holder at one told me antiques etc not selling because 'peoples homes minimalist/not collecting as much any more/collecting not so popular as it was'

- so seems opinions on this thread are widespread, but probably it'll all restart at some point

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