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What Blimey Actually Means

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http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/102137.html

Cor blimey

Meaning An exclamation of surprise.

Origin A euphemism (specifically a minced oath) derived from 'God blind me'.

First recorded in print in Barrère and Leland's A dictionary of slang, jargon and cant 1888–90, 1897.

An alternative spelling was used, slightly earlier, by Arthur Morrison in A child of the Jago, 1896:

"Gawblimy, not what?"

It is also sometimes spelled gorblimey.

Thats why 8 out of 10 of us prefer to say "bo||ocks!"

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Guest AuntJess
http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/102137.html

Cor blimey

Meaning An exclamation of surprise.

Origin A euphemism (specifically a minced oath) derived from 'God blind me'.

First recorded in print in Barrère and Leland's A dictionary of slang, jargon and cant 1888��"90, 1897.

An alternative spelling was used, slightly earlier, by Arthur Morrison in A child of the Jago, 1896:

"Gawblimy, not what?"

It is also sometimes spelled gorblimey.

Thats why 8 out of 10 of us prefer to say "bo||ocks!"

'Crikey' too has connections with Christ - "Christ kill me" or summat similar.

'Bloody' - as in Bloody Hell - comes from "By our lady" which refers to the Virgin Mary.

Most old cuss words are religious in origin.

Better stick to " well I'll go to our house", " flippin' eck", or even " stone the crows".

That way you won't come under the blasphemy laws that way, which threaten to be in place afore long here. :rolleyes:

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They were in place for hundreds of years actually Aunt J: and as society crumbled into ignorance and uncouth language and behaviour, they were rarely invoked.

Now the new ones of course will be focused at those who take the name of the prophet in vain.................

Etc.

It has been of interest to me that Eric Arthur Blair's (George Orwell) book "Down and out in London and Paris" written in the 1930s accurately forecast the degredation of common language and particularly how the "F" word would become common coin: whereas when Orwell wrote the book (which recounts his own most interesting experiences) such language was only the province of tramps and the lowest in society.

Now, of course, it is depressingly common: as are other similar epithets.

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Guest X-QUORK

I can't remember which one, but there's a swear word that derives from "See You Next Tuesday".

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Guest AuntJess
I can't remember which one, but there's a swear word that derives from "See You Next Tuesday".

:P

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And Orwell covered this one too in the book earlier mentioned.

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I can't remember which one, but there's a swear word that derives from "See You Next Tuesday".

don't be a silly SYNT, :P

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