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beatrice

Repairs To A Grade 11 Building

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Good evening everyone

This is my first post so please excuse my naivety.

Does anyone have any advice as to whether there are grants available to replace a huge old fashioned boiler in a Grade II building please? The house is used as a business but the cost of a replacement is crippling.

Many thanks

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Good evening everyone

This is my first post so please excuse my naivety.

Does anyone have any advice as to whether there are grants available to replace a huge old fashioned boiler in a Grade II building please? The house is used as a business but the cost of a replacement is crippling.

Many thanks

That's a new metaphor for Gordon Brown in Downing Street.

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Doesn't it just lol

To answer your question,I don't think so.I live in a mid 17th C Grade II farmhouse and the listing seems to be mainly negative.For a definitive answer speak to the Conservation Officer at your local council.Be aware though that it may alert them if you are doing anything else and these types are a right royal pain in the butt.

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To answer your question,I don't think so.I live in a mid 17th C Grade II farmhouse and the listing seems to be mainly negative.For a definitive answer speak to the Conservation Officer at your local council.Be aware though that it may alert them if you are doing anything else and these types are a right royal pain in the butt.

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Thanks for replying profitofdoom. I had heard that, so I don't think I will go down that road as yet It just seems that 50k to remove and replace a boiler is frightening for my friend. Maybe it would be cheaper for us to go to college and train as a Gas engineer LOL.

:blink:

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Thanks for replying profitofdoom. I had heard that, so I don't think I will go down that road as yet It just seems that 50k to remove and replace a boiler is frightening for my friend. Maybe it would be cheaper for us to go to college and train as a Gas engineer LOL.

:blink:

50K? Bloody Hell, Is it a Grade II listed gas fuelled power station?

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Thanks for replying profitofdoom. I had heard that, so I don't think I will go down that road as yet It just seems that 50k to remove and replace a boiler is frightening for my friend. Maybe it would be cheaper for us to go to college and train as a Gas engineer LOL.

:blink:

Often cheaper to install more than one domestic gas boilers, these are pro rata often cheaper than the industrial size ones. Try posting your question on www.diydoctor.org.uk under gas/central heating.

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I think someone is taking the mick out of you.

I live in a grade II listed. Get to know your conservation officer and get to know what he's done in the past to other buildings (i.e. what has been passed). ;)

It also depends on the type of listing you have. Grade I is the worst because you can't touch anything, however there are listings in the grade II listing so you need to find out exactly what yours is.

BTW always get three quotes and find out as much as you can before you ask for quotes. Its a bit like cars and women show the mechainc you know a bit and they won't rip you off.

Good luck. ;)

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I think someone is taking the mick out of you.

I live in a grade II listed. Get to know your conservation officer and get to know what he's done in the past to other buildings (i.e. what has been passed). ;)

It also depends on the type of listing you have. Grade I is the worst because you can't touch anything, however there are listings in the grade II listing so you need to find out exactly what yours is.

BTW always get three quotes and find out as much as you can before you ask for quotes. Its a bit like cars and women show the mechainc you know a bit and they won't rip you off.

Good luck. ;)

This isn't strictly true. No grade of listing has the effect of freezing a building in it's current state for ever. If it did that then it would most likey end up being counter-productive because buildings would rapidly reach a point where no one would buy them because they were so out dated. For any listed building you only need permission to do something which changes the character of the building, not for every tiny detail change.

The grade of listing doesn't doesn't dictate what you can or can't do, it only refers to how historically or architectually important the building is. Obviously though, the grade of listing may affect how the decision is arrived at but it's very much down to the character of the individual building its self.

I lived in a top floor flat in a grade I building and had no problem at all geting permission to extend into the loft space and put a spiral staricase in. The only thing they wanted leaving in place was an original internal wall which had a window in it which I simply enclosed with a new facade.

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This isn't strictly true. No grade of listing has the effect of freezing a building in it's current state for ever. If it did that then it would most likey end up being counter-productive because buildings would rapidly reach a point where no one would buy them because they were so out dated. For any listed building you only need permission to do something which changes the character of the building, not for every tiny detail change.

The grade of listing doesn't doesn't dictate what you can or can't do, it only refers to how historically or architectually important the building is. Obviously though, the grade of listing may affect how the decision is arrived at but it's very much down to the character of the individual building its self.

I lived in a top floor flat in a grade I building and had no problem at all geting permission to extend into the loft space and put a spiral staricase in. The only thing they wanted leaving in place was an original internal wall which had a window in it which I simply enclosed with a new facade.

In the end the decision rests with the Planning Committee.A Conservation Officer will make recommendations but it's up to them to decide whether to allow alterations.So butter up your local Councillors,ask if they need a new duck house (North of the Wash :Pigeon Loft)

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Your standard grade 2 listing generally doesn't restrict what you do to the inside of the place at all.

We own 3 or 4 grade 2 listed houses that we have fixed up for renting out, and have not had any problems with internal work, including changing heating boilers. We would however have to re-roof in the same old-style tiles, and replace windows with the same wooden type, not UPVC etc.

As another poster pointed out, in a big old house it can often be cheaper and easier to fit two smaller combi boilers to heat and provide hot water to different parts of the house.

I have done this with my house - we have two standard combi boilers, one for the top half, one for the bottom half.

Another advantage of this method is that if one boiler stops working, we can use the other bathroom to have a hot shower until the other one is fixed!

We recently replaced an old boiler in a 6 bedroom, 3 floor grade 2 listed 300 year old house, and it cost around £2800 + VAT supply and fit.

I have never heard of the old central heating boiler itself being of sufficient architectural interest to make its replacement with a modern one a requirement.

For a start, they only last 10 or 20 years, so cannot be part of the real historical fabric of an old building.

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Your standard grade 2 listing generally doesn't restrict what you do to the inside of the place at all.

We own 3 or 4 grade 2 listed houses that we have fixed up for renting out, and have not had any problems with internal work, including changing heating boilers. We would however have to re-roof in the same old-style tiles, and replace windows with the same wooden type, not UPVC etc.

As another poster pointed out, in a big old house it can often be cheaper and easier to fit two smaller combi boilers to heat and provide hot water to different parts of the house.

I have done this with my house - we have two standard combi boilers, one for the top half, one for the bottom half.

Another advantage of this method is that if one boiler stops working, we can use the other bathroom to have a hot shower until the other one is fixed!

We recently replaced an old boiler in a 6 bedroom, 3 floor grade 2 listed 300 year old house, and it cost around £2800 + VAT supply and fit.

I have never heard of the old central heating boiler itself being of sufficient architectural interest to make its replacement with a modern one a requirement.

For a start, they only last 10 or 20 years, so cannot be part of the real historical fabric of an old building.

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Hello

Sorry for not replying sooner, I have been away for a while. Thank you so much for the advice. My friend is now looking into the possibilities you suggested.

This has been a great response for my first posting , thank you all so much xx

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