Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
R K

China Shuts Down Hotmail, Twitter, Flickr

Recommended Posts

the more I hear about the chinese, the more I am liking them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/worl...icle6414510.ece

Two days before the 20th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, China's censors moved today to limit the access of the country's increasingly tech-savvy population to vast swathes of the internet.

The first victims were the rising population of tweeters, who use the micro-blogging service Twitter as a platform for humour — often scatological — and political comment.

Then the popular photo-posting service Flickr disappeared, as did the Hotmail e-mail service and Microsoft's new search engine, Bing. The blocks did not stop there, however: MSN Spaces also disappeared

The timing is scarcely a coincidence. Thursday marks the 20th anniversary of the entry of the People’s Liberation Army into Beijing on June 4 1989 to crush seven weeks of student-led demonstrations centred in Tiananmen Square.

The response of users was immediate — but could only be seen by those able to navigate their way over the Great Firewall of China, for example via proxy servers.

Flypig, who maintains a famous and irreverent blog in China, said: “Now the 3 web services I cannot live without — Twitter, Flickr, YouTube — are all blocked in China. Cheers, motherf***ers!â€

Twitter has become increasingly popular in China over recent months, partly because it allows words or phrases that bring up an automatic ban or block on most internet service providers in China — such as 6/4 (or June 4). Indeed, mentions were rife about Charter 08 — a document issued online late last year by a group of prominent intellectuals and scholars calling for greater freedoms of speech and democracy. Any attempt to write the words Charter 08 on the internet in China or to reach a site containing references to it are blocked....article continues...

Gordon must have got a semi reading that.............

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gordon must have got a semi reading that.............

we will have the same when Internet 2 is revealed. You will have to pay a subscription direct for the service it has been rumoured, so you can't bypass the system.

Then they will shut the old internet down.

Of course it will still exist, as things always have a habit of doing, but only for the illiterate technical savvy, so that's about 2% of the UK populace then.

(do you know I have been spelling populas like that, but apparently I have been spelling it incorrectly :unsure: )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
we will have the same when Internet 2 is revealed. You will have to pay a subscription direct for the service it has been rumoured, so you can't bypass the system.

I assume you don't mean this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet2

http://www.internet2.edu/about/

Of course it will still exist, as things always have a habit of doing, but only for the illiterate technical savvy, so that's about 2% of the UK populace then.

Illiterate? Why?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Which bit were you reading? The advert for chnlove.com ?

I can confirm (being in China) that hotmail has been blocked as of a few hours ago for me. I was going to setup a HTTP tunnel so I could get youtube working anyway, now I just have much more motivation as my hotmail address is my main one and i'm certainly not going to use Gmail :rolleyes: Google have enough of my personal information.

This is a lot more than it looks, Google have probably been pushing China to do this for years with various bribes and incentives. Looks like China finally bit, after all Microsoft already hates China with a passion for it's blatent copyrighting of just about everything in the world (including Windows just about everywhere). Though it's quite nice being able to watch almost every Western TV show/ movie via high quality on demand stream (for free) ;)

Honestly the Chinese government probably realised they had nothing to lose, Google is still being kept in check by Baidu here which still has a bigger share of the market so there isn't risk of monopoly.

Yahoo will be next.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
we will have the same when Internet 2 is revealed. You will have to pay a subscription direct for the service it has been rumoured, so you can't bypass the system.

Then they will shut the old internet down.

Of course it will still exist, as things always have a habit of doing, but only for the illiterate technical savvy, so that's about 2% of the UK populace then.

(do you know I have been spelling populas like that, but apparently I have been spelling it incorrectly :unsure: )

Who are "They"? The lizard people?

You don't really believe what you've just written do you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yep.

Yep, you don't mean this, or yep you do? :huh::)

I haven't seen anything that would suggest Internet2 is a closed shop with heavy restrictions. The main difference is it uses Ipv6 and high bandwidth fibre optic connections.

I can use IPv6 with my current ISP and I effectively already pay a subscription to access the current internet: my ISP pays for upstream connection to other networks on the internet.

Do you have any links?

oops, I meant literate. :unsure:

:lol:

Just checking. ;)

Edited by 'CrossTheBreeze

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yep, you don't mean this, or yep you do? :huh::)

I haven't seen anything that would suggest Internet2 is a closed shop with heavy restrictions. The main difference is it uses Ipv6 and high bandwidth fibre optic connections.

I can use IPv6 with my current ISP and I effectively already pay a subscription to access the current internet: my ISP pays for upstream connection to other networks on the internet.

Do you have any links?

Have a look through this thread.

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/ind...=114993&hl=

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't we have a similar scheme in the UK,

"Communications firms are being asked to record all internet contacts between people as part of a modernisation in UK police surveillance tactics.

The home secretary scrapped plans for a database but wants details to be held and organised for security services.

The new system would track all e-mails, phone calls and internet use, including visits to social network sites. "

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/8020039.stm

She got fired for porn and expenses rule breaking btw for all the Chinese readers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

internet2.

its the same as internet 1 but with a new name.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here it is, Flypig. not much to read though.

https://twitter.com/flypig

Whats a VP tunnel?

like internet 2 is the same as internet 1 a VP tunnel is the same as a VPN tunnel but with a word removed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks I took a look and it appears there is confusion about the term "Internet2". It was originally used from 1996 onwards by a non-profit organisation working to create a higher speed network. CERN have been involved as they would like to transfer large volumes of data collected during particle accelerator experiments.

"Internet2" seems to now be used by to refer to some kind of government controlled internet. To me they appear to be two different things.

Regarding the thread you linked to, there only seemed to be two issues: Net neutrality and censorship of blogs.

Net neutrality has been pushed by some media organisations and large ISPs in the US already. This is more an issue about profit than anything else. ISPs would like to be able to treat some IP packets with higher priority than others so that, for example, traffic for certain sites has greater bandwidth. Working with content creators, they could then offer packages that provide a high quality stream from a particular site while other traffic is subject to delays and bandwidth restrictions. So far governments only seem to be involved due to lobbying by content providers and ISPs. Customers can change ISP.

The suggestion to censor blogs just shows how little politicians understand about the workings of the internet. Unless they could get worldwide agreement to censor blogs, a unilateral action by the EU would just push blogs onto non-EU servers punishing EU-based hosting companies.

Western economies now see lots of business via the internet and encryption is necessary for secure financial transactions. The same encryption technologies allow communication without logging or snooping by governments. It will be very difficult for governments to implement censorship without harming trade, although I'm sure they will try.

It will be up to customers to select their ISP appropriately.

My ISP objects to the EU directives. Here is an example of their response:

Logging outgoing email

The regulations require very little to be logged for our outgoing email services.

* Only customers actually using our email services are affected anyway - anyone sending email directly do not use the service we provide for email and so nothing is logged in relation to email they send

* 11(1): Sender details: We have to log the user ID - but we don't generate or process that while sending email, so nothing to log

* 11(2): Sender details: We have to log the user ID and telephone number where the communication enters the telephone network - again, not something we process while sending email so nothing to log.

* 11(3): Sender details: The name and address of the subscriber or registered user to which the IP, user ID or telephone number was allocated at the time of the communication. Well, we don't have user ID, or telephone number so it is down to IP. We process the IP, but not the associated name and address, so nothing to log. Note that we are not required to log the IP address itself!

* 12(2): Recipient details: The name and address of the subscriber or registered user to which the IP, user ID or telephone number was allocated at the time of the communication. We don't have any of that for outgoing email. Nothing to log. Note that this also relates to intended recipient - how would we know someones intention, we only know what they actually did and cannot read their mind.

* 13(2): The date and time of the log-in to and log-off from the internet e-mail. Our outgoing mail server does not require a log-in or log-off. So nothing to log.

In summary, our outgoing email services log NOTHING under this directive.

Black boxes

We have no so called black boxes to covertly monitor traffic and/or pass traffic monitoring to the authorities or anyone else. Obviously the law is such that we may have to add such black boxes, but we would resist as far as possible. We may even find we are not allowed to change this web page if ever that happens. However, I, as director, am happy to answer direct questions on this matter on irc (user RevK) or on usenet and you can get paranoid if I refuse to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They don't peer with anyone ?, that's impressive.

Could you clarify what you mean? I said they object to it not that they ignore it. They strictly comply with their interpretation of the directive and log as little information as possible.

Update

We have received a few comments on this, including some from a lawyer. It seems that some of what we have said is right and some just highlights the confusion in the drafting. It may be that to avoid invading peoples privacy too much we may have to take extra steps (separate companies for email maybe). We'll see. At the end of the day people with something to hide can do so easily, but everyone else - normal people with nothing to hide will find that their personal data is logged and available to all sorts of people unless we do take steps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks I took a look and it appears there is confusion about the term "Internet2". It was originally used from 1996 onwards by a non-profit organisation working to create a higher speed network. CERN have been involved as they would like to transfer large volumes of data collected during particle accelerator experiments.

"Internet2" seems to now be used by to refer to some kind of government controlled internet. To me they appear to be two different things.

Regarding the thread you linked to, there only seemed to be two issues: Net neutrality and censorship of blogs.

Net neutrality has been pushed by some media organisations and large ISPs in the US already. This is more an issue about profit than anything else. ISPs would like to be able to treat some IP packets with higher priority than others so that, for example, traffic for certain sites has greater bandwidth. Working with content creators, they could then offer packages that provide a high quality stream from a particular site while other traffic is subject to delays and bandwidth restrictions. So far governments only seem to be involved due to lobbying by content providers and ISPs. Customers can change ISP.

The suggestion to censor blogs just shows how little politicians understand about the workings of the internet. Unless they could get worldwide agreement to censor blogs, a unilateral action by the EU would just push blogs onto non-EU servers punishing EU-based hosting companies.

Western economies now see lots of business via the internet and encryption is necessary for secure financial transactions. The same encryption technologies allow communication without logging or snooping by governments. It will be very difficult for governments to implement censorship without harming trade, although I'm sure they will try.

It will be up to customers to select their ISP appropriately.

My ISP objects to the EU directives. Here is an example of their response:

your faith in the concept of freedom of speech & the capitalist approach to government designed new ventures, via their extremely clever marketing arms, is misplaced I fear.

You think censorship is difficult for government to implement I hear you say.

Go and stand outside of parliment & start slagging off the government, watch how quickly those new 2008 laws are implemented against your freedom of speech quest.

When the police arrive in their army style outfits, try to get your friend to take some photos & see what happens. :ph34r:

You don't have freedom, what you have is the illusion of freedom.

Just the same as the majority of hpi is illusionary for the UK home owners.

Watch what they do, not what they say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Who are "They"? The lizard people?

You don't really believe what you've just written do you?

Are you so educated and have you researched the isue to be 100% sure we don't have hidden powers telling our MP's what to do and say or better but bribing our MP's to do XYZ ?

i'm not sure i'm as smart as you or understand string theroy and in my world nothing happens by accident

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   292 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.