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A Story, Has Anyone Heard Anything Similar To This?

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A story was recently related to me... and I'd like your help to try and establish if it is accurate. The story goes something like this (this is a retelling of a retelling of a story... so the initial context is mine - and the last bit is as verbatim as I can manage.)

A couple absolutely adore dogs - they're dog daft - they run a business during the week looking after their dogs; take their dogs to shows at the weekend - and focus their entire day around their working dogs... (Dog mentalists, if you ask me, but I'm not a huge dog fan... having an allergy means dogs simply don't float my boat, personally.) Anyhow, this couple do dog-related holiday experiences and invite paying customers to enjoy doggy days... which, I'm informed, is great fun if you're a dog-mentalist-type... I can believe all this 100% - I've great evidence.

The story is one related by the dog-lovers to more recent customers, and it involves international finance. (As accurate as I can be from here on in...)

An American couple visited the dog-lovers and paid for the sheepdog trial experience. At the end of the day, the American couple explain that they love the dogs... and the owners are happy to have shared their passion. The American couple go further, and offer to buy the prize dog... and are rather insistent. The dog lover owners (who were two steps away in the chain of getting this story to me) say they were horrified - and politely declined. The Americans asked again to buy the prize dog - insisting that money was no object - they loved the dog and simply had to have it. The owners said that there was no way they could sell their dogs which were their sole passion - and the Americans left. A week later, a letter arrives in the post, with a blank signed cheque attached... the letter informs the dog lovers to fill in their price - whatever that is. The story ends with the dog lovers printing "NOT FOR SALE" across the cheque and mailing it back.

This story leaves me feeling very conflicted. The story is so emotive to me that I find it easy to feel overwhelmed... The story has an air of religion about it... and that makes me distrustful... I also wonder about the motives of some of the story tellers in a way a very emotional person (especially someone potty about dogs) might not. I've absolute confidence in the honesty of the person who told me this story - but I'm willing to consider that their judgement or interpretation might have been skewed by a love of dogs... they certainly didn't ask the questions I would have asked - for example - which bank's cheque? Was it a famous name? Was it an off-shore account? The story also has a moralizing aspect to it - and I'm a little distrustful of that - the villain seems so incredibly obvious... should the story be taken at face value? Could the Americans have been so socially and practically inept? Are there ulterior motives (no matter how perverted) that would justify the fabrication of this story as a sales pitch... perhaps by someone who has a warped understanding of a comment from a fellow dog lover?

So, my question - with which I'd like your help, is this: Is this story likely true (i.e. did the Americans in the story exist? I know the dog lovers exist and met.) Is the story fabricated as a defence against a perceived covetous threat... Is the story repeated anti-American propaganda? Is this propaganda intended to suggest a currency collapse has already happened in the USA? Is this a story from a long time ago, or from the recent past (which was what the story claims.) Has anyone else heard a similar story? If so, can you put a date on it?

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Yeah its called 101 Dalmations.

I assume this is an anecdotal. I don't mean to be dense but what answers are you looking for really? You hoping someone on here knows these people, or are you hoping for a philosophical muse on how more of these stories will pop up as people try to validate themselves in the new 'money isn't everything' period of austerity we are almost certainly going to "enjoy" over the next decade or so.

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All it suggests to me is that the Americans had a lot of money ( I don't think it says anything about the value of the money generally) and wanted the dog. It further suggests they thought that everything has a price and that they were so rich and onmipotent that they could get whatever they wanted.

We can't tell if it is just the personality of those americans or most americans ( though IMHO culturally they do seem to believe everything comes down to money in the end which British still don't....... quite), or indeed if it is just an allegory.

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Guest DissipatedYouthIsValuable

Yeah, I heard the same story the other night from a bloke who thinks he knows a couple who run a donkey sanctuary. Except that the couple who wanted the prize donkey were Korean chefs.

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I think you looking for so much more in what is a not particularly unusual story. Your over thinking, in a huge way. Why are there any 'bad guys' in this?

My missus used to keep horses. Occasionally she would be approached at shows by a keen 'in the moment' buyer'. Offers were always well over market price, but the damn animal did look fine on the day. She always refused. Some parents of spoilt brats, could indeed be as insistent as your 'Americans'. But for her, it was always no sale.

There are 2 outcomes to this.

Speak to anyone Irish, and they'll tell you, you NEVER turn down good money for a horse. Hence my Missus should have sold, and is the idiot in the scenario. As any horse owner will tell you, they can break a leg anytime.

Or, the 3 years she'd invested in bringing that animal on, to then achieve what she wanted to achieve, was priceless. My missus is emotive? or achieved something that she'd worked hard to get? That in itself has 'value', and yes its the buyers who set that value.

Either way, why should there be any negative reflections either side of this? The American viewed the dogs as priceless. They may be correct especially if they could 'earn' huge amounts from the US showing market, and set themselves up as credible trainers in the meantime...........

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Same thing happened to my football club.

Bunch of americans with no money and no interest in football wrote a cheque for £800 million which they didn't have. Turned out they borrowed it at extortionate rates from JP Morgan and an assortment of hedge funds.

It's a scam. Steer clear.

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This has the strong whiff of the urban myth about it. 'Love of an owner for his dog is beyond price..' etc. Plus 'Those bloody Yanks! - think their dollars can buy anything..' sort of stuff.

However, I personally would have entered 'five million bucks' on the cheque, and cashed it. Then scoured every dogs home and breeder for an identical collie. The dog found, he would have been despatched to them.

When they eventually complained that the dog lacked the skills they had seen him display previously, I would have given them some old toffee about sheep dogs being 'one-man dogs' etc.

Cash in the net. Hello Bahamas! and the high life. Job done.

Wily old world has nicely slipped a length up pushy new world, as historian Simon Schama might say.

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... and I meant to add. This particular story does indeed sound b*ll*x if only for one reason;

"the owners were horrified......"

They wouldnt have been. Good animals will have offers on them every week...................

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A story was recently related to me... and I'd like your help to try and establish if it is accurate. The story goes something like this (this is a retelling of a retelling of a story... so the initial context is mine - and the last bit is as verbatim as I can manage.)

A couple absolutely adore dogs - they're dog daft - they run a business during the week looking after their dogs; take their dogs to shows at the weekend - and focus their entire day around their working dogs... (Dog mentalists, if you ask me, but I'm not a huge dog fan... having an allergy means dogs simply don't float my boat, personally.) Anyhow, this couple do dog-related holiday experiences and invite paying customers to enjoy doggy days... which, I'm informed, is great fun if you're a dog-mentalist-type... I can believe all this 100% - I've great evidence.

The story is one related by the dog-lovers to more recent customers, and it involves international finance. (As accurate as I can be from here on in...)

An American couple visited the dog-lovers and paid for the sheepdog trial experience. At the end of the day, the American couple explain that they love the dogs... and the owners are happy to have shared their passion. The American couple go further, and offer to buy the prize dog... and are rather insistent. The dog lover owners (who were two steps away in the chain of getting this story to me) say they were horrified - and politely declined. The Americans asked again to buy the prize dog - insisting that money was no object - they loved the dog and simply had to have it. The owners said that there was no way they could sell their dogs which were their sole passion - and the Americans left. A week later, a letter arrives in the post, with a blank signed cheque attached... the letter informs the dog lovers to fill in their price - whatever that is. The story ends with the dog lovers printing "NOT FOR SALE" across the cheque and mailing it back.

This story leaves me feeling very conflicted. The story is so emotive to me that I find it easy to feel overwhelmed... The story has an air of religion about it... and that makes me distrustful... I also wonder about the motives of some of the story tellers in a way a very emotional person (especially someone potty about dogs) might not. I've absolute confidence in the honesty of the person who told me this story - but I'm willing to consider that their judgement or interpretation might have been skewed by a love of dogs... they certainly didn't ask the questions I would have asked - for example - which bank's cheque? Was it a famous name? Was it an off-shore account? The story also has a moralizing aspect to it - and I'm a little distrustful of that - the villain seems so incredibly obvious... should the story be taken at face value? Could the Americans have been so socially and practically inept? Are there ulterior motives (no matter how perverted) that would justify the fabrication of this story as a sales pitch... perhaps by someone who has a warped understanding of a comment from a fellow dog lover?

So, my question - with which I'd like your help, is this: Is this story likely true (i.e. did the Americans in the story exist? I know the dog lovers exist and met.) Is the story fabricated as a defence against a perceived covetous threat... Is the story repeated anti-American propaganda? Is this propaganda intended to suggest a currency collapse has already happened in the USA? Is this a story from a long time ago, or from the recent past (which was what the story claims.) Has anyone else heard a similar story? If so, can you put a date on it?

This is the plot for the children's book, That Rabbit Belongs to Emily Brown by Cressida Cowell.

The "dog" is a rabbit and the "Americans" is the The Queen.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/That-Rabbit-Belong...n/dp/1843624516

I can believe it as some people seem to believe that money can buy anything, and it can't.

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Sounds like ******** to me...

Unless you heard it straight from the dog lovers it holds no credibility, I have heard a number of Urban myths and the tellers always want to add a bit of a hook to make it seem more believable.

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Thanks very much, all. Urban myth or not, the story was real - I really heard it. What surprises me is that no-one seems to have mentioned the key ethical issues here:

The motivation of the alleged (possibly imaginary) buyers using the (definitely imaginary) money... and the ethics thereof.

The motivation of the alleged sellers - and the motivation thereof.

The ethics of offering an arbitrarily large sum - and practical consequences.

The legality of sending a blank signed cheque (this is plain and simple fraud...)

The relevance of personal belongings.

So, if this is a fairy story urban legend... I hoped someone would point me to a version of it on 'snopes' - or something like that. It matters to me if it is an original fairy story. Irrespective of the truth of the underlying story, the story itself I think a good one. While no-one answering here seems to get the points it raises, I've told this story to two real people... the first thought it fascinatingly rich and went away to have a think about it... the second, my landlord, initially, didn't get it... then, after some going around the houses, it turns out that something very similar happened to him last week - though he didn't get it in writing. He rents some fields to grow hey for his cows... paid up-front, in advance... however, last week he was told to mow the land before his crops were fully grown... (he reckoned yields down 20%) because the owners had double booked tenants, and had also rented the land for a celebrity party to pitch a big marquee and have a huge private party. My landlord was not asked for his permission - but told to mow. He says he could have dug his heels in - but he didn't see the point. The owners of the land were unapologetic and the only compensation he was offered was unlimited free tickets to their race track... but he doesn't gamble. He asked me if I wanted any free tickets... he'd no use... I agreed that I didn't need them, either. I commented that I'd have said that 7.2bn free tickets for next weekend would seem fair compensation - I could give them away... but would need to make sure that his venue was up-to-scratch for that capacity as I'd not be able to be responsible for any health and safety risks. The party in the fields is being organised by a Frenchman - who, my landlord says, nobody understands.

It's a funny old world - isn't it. Some stories work best on the internet and some in real life.

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I'm tied to it being a scam of some kind .. exactly how it works I don't know .. it may be that there is some detail missing that would point it out as a scam ..

The Dodgy cheque scam is pretty much as old as the cheque. I bank with Credit Agricole for Euro's. This was not known by the North African gentleman who tried to pay for some equipment with a CA cheque with a friend of mine. Very professionally done .. a nice little card with the "Cheque security line" +33 telephone number nice lady answers very professionally and speaks just the right amount of English. Gives him the security code that guarantees the cheque will be paid ..

The guys had in fact left the building with the goods before I turned up, but fortunately had used a minicab firm known to my friend. I phoned my branch of CA and they told me what I sort of knew the "Cheque security line" does not exist, this was a stolen cheque book and would we please ask the British police to phone the Surete if they picked up these gentlemen.

They did about an hour later at the hotel (not a shit-hole the police had to take them down the back stairs, guests at this hotel were not allowed to leave in handcuffs via the lobby) that the minicab driver had dropped them off at ..

Foreign cheques are always suspect (and British ones at that .. I don't know if you can call up the bank about a cheque here as you can in France but I suspect that "Data Protection" can stop that ..)

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