Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
shallowthinker

Any Thoughts On Rowlands Gill?

Recommended Posts

Anyone have knowledge of what its like over in Rowlands Gill, particuarly Shearburn Towers and this property?

http://powering.expertagent.co.uk/(S(ukjcw...0-B794AA4D98D6}

Are the houses built well, they all seem to be on a flipping huge sloping hill, anyone know of ground stability problems?

Seems they are asking £50k more than Zoopla reckons its worth, but i guess zoopla is pants really and its guesses are way far from reality.

Asking prices in the area seem to have fallen +-11% over the last year mind, so with that in mind, would £340 be about right?

Any thoughts?

Edited by shallowthinker

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have family who live there and the house is nice enough. Not the most sensible internal layout in my opinion, but each to their own. Seems a nice neighbourhood though and very generous sized plots by today's standards, with access to nice countryside for walks etc. The problem is transport, as you'd be very reliant on a car.

The thing you have to remember with Zoopla is that it doesn't take into account changes made by the owners since purchase. Their garden looks pretentious, but would have cost some money, and when was teh conservatory added?

Having said this, Zoopla's falls from peak aren't as large as Nationwide/Halifax. What did it sell for in the past? Do you know what number it is?

Edited by tccambs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have family who live there and the house is nice enough. Not the most sensible internal layout in my opinion, but each to their own. Seems a nice neighbourhood though and very generous sized plots by today's standards, with access to nice countryside for walks etc. The problem is transport, as you'd be very reliant on a car.

The thing you have to remember with Zoopla is that it doesn't take into account changes made by the owners since purchase. Their garden looks pretentious, but would have cost some money, and when was teh conservatory added?

Having said this, Zoopla's falls from peak aren't as large as Nationwide/Halifax. What did it sell for in the past? Do you know what number it is?

I don't know when the conservatory was added, but could'nt have been more than 9 years ago as thats when the estate was built.

Its number 10, and apparently was sold for £340k in July '05.

Hard to tell the values of the properties there as not many similar ones have been bought or sold recently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't know when the conservatory was added, but could'nt have been more than 9 years ago as thats when the estate was built.

Its number 10, and apparently was sold for £340k in July '05.

Hard to tell the values of the properties there as not many similar ones have been bought or sold recently.

If you're seriously interested in it, then the best thing to do is ask. Vendors are normally only too happy to boast about the 'upgrades' they've made to a property.

If it turns out that the garden and conservatory are the same as they were in 2005, then you certainly wouldn't want to be paying as much as they did back then. Use the nationwide or halifax house price calculator (Google them) to get an idea of 'value' and offer below that to reflect aging of the improvements.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know those who love RG, and those who hate it. I'm rather closer to one of the latter, who got quite vocal when I suggested it! Problem with RG as a whole is that, like a number of communities up this way is that they built along roads, so that they tend to be long and thin, with little in the way of a centre. This is not too good if you are looking for the sort of "village" feel that people think of in more southern parts. It seems to be three-quarters housing estate, and only one-quarter anything else - which suits some, but not everyone.

RG is a car place - you can't drive/haven't got access to a car and you are rather stuck. 2 adults plus two small kids and you need 2 cars. Add in someone over 17 and you'll need three. It's a bit short on facilities of its own because everyone who lives there has to drive somewhere else to work, or shop or whatever.

Having said that, if you're a car person/car family anyway, and you are happy living in a strung out largely dormitory community, then RG is quite close to some nice countryside, and has some quite swish housing.

db

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I know those who love RG, and those who hate it. I'm rather closer to one of the latter, who got quite vocal when I suggested it! Problem with RG as a whole is that, like a number of communities up this way is that they built along roads, so that they tend to be long and thin, with little in the way of a centre. This is not too good if you are looking for the sort of "village" feel that people think of in more southern parts. It seems to be three-quarters housing estate, and only one-quarter anything else - which suits some, but not everyone.

RG is a car place - you can't drive/haven't got access to a car and you are rather stuck. 2 adults plus two small kids and you need 2 cars. Add in someone over 17 and you'll need three. It's a bit short on facilities of its own because everyone who lives there has to drive somewhere else to work, or shop or whatever.

Having said that, if you're a car person/car family anyway, and you are happy living in a strung out largely dormitory community, then RG is quite close to some nice countryside, and has some quite swish housing.

db

Thanks db and tccambs for your input.

I guess I'm a car dependant person really, got a few in the household already, mind we need them as where I live now is very similar to RG in the fact that the "centre" is strung out along a road, but its a noisier and faster road than in RG, with less facilities and not too pleasant to walk along because of this.

That "village feel" is a nice thing, but damn difficult to find a place up in the NE which has that feel and which also ticks all the other boxes for me (close to Newcastle for work, decent sized gardens for the kids, good parking at the front, contryside on the doorstep, etc.) Any ideas?

Anyways, i guess this estate is newly built, so might have decent standards for the foundations at least, even though the estate is built on a mound. With the shape of the mound the estates on, makes me wonder if its an old spoil heap from centuries old mining? Hmm, have to get down to the council and do a search about that.

tccambs: what do you mean by "the gardens looking pretentious"?

shallow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tccambs: what do you mean by "the gardens looking pretentious"?

Look at the pictures in the link you posted. They've got a pond, some earthworks, a bridge etc. All they need is a duck island.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Look at the pictures in the link you posted. They've got a pond, some earthworks, a bridge etc. All they need is a duck island.
and a moat :lol:

... and a house for the ducks, who would, in RG, want their own conservatory.

db

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks db and tccambs for your input.

I guess I'm a car dependant person really, got a few in the household already, mind we need them as where I live now is very similar to RG in the fact that the "centre" is strung out along a road, but its a noisier and faster road than in RG, with less facilities and not too pleasant to walk along because of this.

That "village feel" is a nice thing, but damn difficult to find a place up in the NE which has that feel and which also ticks all the other boxes for me (close to Newcastle for work, decent sized gardens for the kids, good parking at the front, contryside on the doorstep, etc.) Any ideas?

Well, you can't always get everything, but you might try looking at Heddon-on-Wall and, a favourite of mine, Horsley. Heddon has some attached "developments" - some better than others (Killiebrigs and surrounding roads not too bad, and many have good views). Horsley is lovely, but doesn't have its own school - some of the property on sale doesn't have much gardern (a little but not much) but gorgeous countryside out of your windows. e.g.

FromFMpdf.png

(Reasons to like Horsley #1 a view from one of the houses on sale)

Houses which might suit you include:

Horsley £385 5-bed

or

Horsley £385 5-bed another one!

Both of these have decent gardens, and both should be amenable to negotiation over price, since they've been on the market a while.

Horsley 4-bed Barn conversion £385

This one is labelled "semi" but take no notice - it's a barn conversion and has a wall adjoining another farm - building. And the views from this one are great - unlike the others it's a bit short in the garden department, but a nice family home all the same, and Horsley a real villagey feel.

Sounds like I'm selling in Horsely - which I'm not, but at point we did consider buying in it!

Both Heddon and Horsley have now been bypassed, so the A69, though close, doesn't go through the villages any more. These are also on the North bank of the Tyne, meaning that you don't have to find a Tyne crossing to get to work in Newcastle - which, believe me, is something that you might well get very tired of, very quickly.

Right down at river level is Wylam which is "highly sort after" - has its own station on the Tynedale railway and has some pretty older properties and certainly the villagey feel. It's negatives are the desirable properties seem to be expensive, and some of the places which look nice, but not too pricey are probably subject to flooding - make sure you check the DoE website for flood risks in anywhere that offers you a place close to the river. Wylam is mostly on the south bank of the Tyne, but has its own bridge and a link to the A69.

Rather further along the Tyne are Ovingham (pronounced ov-inge-ham - soft g (as in gin) and the "h" pronounced (as in ham) and Ovington (where the g is just part of "ing" with an ordinary "tun" on the end) - no idea why!). The former is a very old village, and is often called "desirable", which translated means, "a bit pricey", but if you can find a nice house that suits you there (and is not on the flood plain) then you would have the Northumbrian village dream with a reasonable commute to Newcastle without having the cross the river.

Ovington is, IMO, not quite as nice and doesn't have any shops, but those who live there say that it's a good place to be. Obviously it (like most of the others mentioned) is 2-car territory - especially if you have children of secondary school age.

If you fancy older properties you could try looking in Ryton Village. Ryton itself is a little town now, and "Ryton Village" is the oldest bit, and a Conservation area. Pretty and good communications, but you are south of the river. There isn't much classy modern housing, but you can find some if you look. It also has schools up to secondary school level, so you don't have to find a way to get kids to school. Ryton is also surrounded by green belt countryside, so you can be in good walking territory in minutes.

If you would consider a slightly larger place, then you might look at Whickham, which has lots of facilities, including the Metro Centre a mile or so away. There's housing at every level there and some bits of it have very nice views and access to good countryside. Again, you are south of the river, so you would have the crossing to do - or use the bus services which (my car-less friend in Whickham tells me) are quite good enough for those who work in Newcastle.

Some people also praise some of the villages north of Newcastle - close to Morpeth, but I'm less convinced and have not looked at them as closely, as we have looked at going to those parts.

It is also possible to work in Newcastle and live in Durham or Hexham, providing you check access to the A1 (in the case of Durham) and the A69 in the case of Hexham. They are both substantial places in their own right (Durham, of course, having a Cathedral and a University - both very fine), but the commute is noticeably longer.

I haven't mentioned going to the coast, which some people would do. There are properties there to suit most tastes and purses, but you need to be in the right area. You tend to find yourself a bit short of garden there, as salt air and gardens often don't mix but, by way of compensation you might find yourself a short walk from Tynemouth Long Sands, and the Metro goes out that way.

As you can see I'm better informed about the places up the Tyne valley from Newcastle, but if you have any other specific queries I might be able to give some further details.

db

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey db,

Thanks for that excellent post (above).

It also makes me happy that I've also considered all the same areas as you mentioned, explored them and checked-out many of the houses for sale there, and came to very similar conclusions about these areas too.

For me it basically boils down to the individual properties in those areas as some are vastly different from ones right next door with regards to parking, gardens, and proximity to the main access roads of course, and price - basically how desperate the seller is, and how much less they'll take!

I'm with the mindset that if a property has been valued by the EA's at £380k, in this day and age they'll have to accept about 15-20% less (depending on how much the price has dropped since the middle of last year) if they want me to buy the place. Some would call me unrealistic, but over time I'm sure I'll happen on someone unlucky and desperate enough - maybe. And if not, then I won't buy something which I presently consider overpriced. Got to bargain hard in times like these!

Also, for an example, without viewing the properties you highlighted - or the one in RG on the start of the thread, and having a quick look at previous sold prices and the way of the World at the moment, what would you offer (if you were interested and in a position)?

Cheers

-Shallow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As the original owner of the property I could tell you alot about the house, extensions, garden etc.

A "pretentious" garden !! I would love to know the definition of that...would TC care to explain. The gardens are all built on vaying inclines and were clay with very little top soil when sold. So what do you do with them...well we went for planting areas, lawn and water feature / patio... all pretty standard, with the work carried out by myself.

Conservatory was built in 2003.

The current owners were cash buyers, no mortgage, so doubt they will need to move in a hurry, andfrom my dealings with them they are unlikely to be prepared to drop the price.

As for as RG is concerned the biggest issue is commuting, the road to swalwell is a nighmare in morning rush hour, you can end up crawling along for about 2 miles or usually 30 minutes. Go through Burnofield...and you get the sunniside and team valley traffic. So no easy way to avoid it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As the original owner of the property I could tell you alot about the house, extensions, garden etc.

A "pretentious" garden !! I would love to know the definition of that...would TC care to explain. The gardens are all built on vaying inclines and were clay with very little top soil when sold. So what do you do with them...well we went for planting areas, lawn and water feature / patio... all pretty standard, with the work carried out by myself.

Conservatory was built in 2003.

The current owners were cash buyers, no mortgage, so doubt they will need to move in a hurry, andfrom my dealings with them they are unlikely to be prepared to drop the price.

As for as RG is concerned the biggest issue is commuting, the road to swalwell is a nighmare in morning rush hour, you can end up crawling along for about 2 miles or usually 30 minutes. Go through Burnofield...and you get the sunniside and team valley traffic. So no easy way to avoid it.

Right-o, fantastic nucf! Thanks for taking the trouble to register and reply.

The place does look good (although is a bit of a mess inside it now), and the garden certainly fits the bill for kids and pets, and well done for doing the work yourself as its a substantial plot to labour over!

So the conservatory is 6 years old, hmmm, my present one is 10 years old and most of it needs replacing now, with the double glazing seals leaking, and gaps appearing around the frames - seems that those things aren't built to last!

Current owners having no mortgage, not the best sellers for me to deal with, but, who's to say they didn't remortgage later on for some reason? And if they have something else exciting lined-up, they might not want to mess about too much and loose-out for the sake of accepting a few quid less on their present house....

Aye, I agree about the road to Swalwell and the bridge over to Burnopfield and Sunniside all being bottlenecks, best get on my bike if i ever end up in RG then...

So there's no land stability issues in the estate that you knew of?

How were the other neighbours as well? Open and social, or too busy working to pay for their houses to be bothered with eachother?

Cheers nufc,

-shallow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   295 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.