Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Recommended Posts

It looks that way - German government considering putting Opel into 'trust'. Does that mean a sort of temporary nationalisation? Where would that leave Vauxhall?

The' trust' bit has been moved to the Europe pages on Bloomberg.

Edited by blankster

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It looks that way - German government considering putting Opel into 'trust'. Does that mean a sort of temporary nationalisation? Where would that leave Vauxhall?

At the mercy of Mandelson.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope they don't. GM are the biggest customer of the company I work for.

If they go pear shaped, so do a lot of UK jobs. Not just Vauxhall, but the massive OEM parts makers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I hope they don't. GM are the biggest customer of the company I work for.

If they go pear shaped, so do a lot of UK jobs. Not just Vauxhall, but the massive OEM parts makers.

OEM?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OEM?

Original Equipment Manufacturer.

It means parts or components supplied directly to a factory. Not a retail product.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Original Equipment Manufacturer.

It means parts or components supplied directly to a factory. Not a retail product.

OEM product can be retail.

Velcro branded velcro would be an OEM product.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
you mean not cheap rip of parts from China

Not necessarily, some manufacturers aren't interested in selling certain aftermarket parts and there is no OEM product available. Even franchised dealers won't use all genuine parts, most independents will use hardly any if they can avoid it. Some generic parts are superior quality to genuine.

OEM is a handy phrase and sounds better than telling customers they're buying a non-genuine part.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bond holders should get their money back before the shareholders, suprising that this still has a share price. I suppose if a miracle does happen, theres large sums of money to be made, but it seems to me that the shareholders should have been taken out long ago. Why are the bond holders being bent over a barrel still?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remain convinced this all a negotiating tactic to screw the bondholders... it will go technically bankrupt ( chapter 11) in my view then they'll also nail the unions down and we'll end up with something like:

Bondholders 20/30%

Unions 20/30%

sharholders 1/2% (basically wiped out)

Amercian govt 30/40% ( in exchange for another £20/30bn)

Saab sold, opel sold, vauxhall sold etc.

Unions wound back severely in terms of workers pay and conditions and retirement benefits etc

Plants closed

dealerships closed.

But you never know if they can then produce the right cars, well built and as efficiently as toyota they may stand a chance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gloomberg:

Transferred to Opel

GM said today that its European assets such as plants, sales organizations and technology have been transferred to Adam Opel GmbH, based in Ruesselsheim near Frankfurt, signaling a further separation of the European operations from its U.S. parent.

Consolidation of GM Europe a done deal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this is a prime example of crashioning in action. Keeping this company on life support, spreading the pain over a longer period. The recession wont be a sharp one because of such actions and by the time we should be recovering, more companies will have to admit they are finished which in turn just prolongs the agony even further.

What a mess

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not necessarily, some manufacturers aren't interested in selling certain aftermarket parts and there is no OEM product available. Even franchised dealers won't use all genuine parts, most independents will use hardly any if they can avoid it. Some generic parts are superior quality to genuine.

OEM is a handy phrase and sounds better than telling customers they're buying a non-genuine part.

Most people don't realize that 'generic' parts are often made by the same people. My company makes OEM parts for Ford, GM, Nissan and so on. We brand these parts with the customers logo. i.e. the Ford parts will have the Ford logo molded into the plastic casing, and packed into a 'genuine Ford' bag or box.

But, we also make unbranded 'aftermarket' parts. They are identical except for the lack of the logo, and plain packaging. (And they cost a lot less to buy from a motorfactors than the OEM would from a main dealer).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Most people don't realize that 'generic' parts are often made by the same people. My company makes OEM parts for Ford, GM, Nissan and so on. We brand these parts with the customers logo. i.e. the Ford parts will have the Ford logo molded into the plastic casing, and packed into a 'genuine Ford' bag or box.

But, we also make unbranded 'aftermarket' parts. They are identical except for the lack of the logo, and plain packaging. (And they cost a lot less to buy from a motorfactors than the OEM would from a main dealer).

I still remember the issue a motherboard manufacturer had using the wrong glue, all the different rival brands had the same problems and had to recall. It's like LCD or Plasma panels, Sony don't

make their own LCD panels they buy them from another manufacturer or as part of a group. Same with laptop batteries, or car air con systems, sometimes it's a close brand where everyone

thinks it odd, other times it's just seen as a part of a whole so ok.

Or Cisco router production in China, the factories realised the cost of the item was in it's design, marketing and support etc, so running production 24 hours a day instead of 18 they could sell anything extra for

the cost of materials and labour, plus profit. Some ended up in US defence networks after being marked up again for millions in free cash.

Brand counts for a lot, as does design, anything outside the production process.

Edited by Tom Peters

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If it does go under we'll get to see whether the markets have accurately priced the failure into the system!

My guess would be probably not enough. Its tentacles stretch so far I think it'll be a bigger cardiac arrest than Lehman.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well no. It may go bust but the name will live on as there are too many vultures willing to take huge amounts of state money to take over the name......As Obama says...it will emerge stronger as a result of insolvency.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I remain convinced this all a negotiating tactic to screw the bondholders... it will go technically bankrupt ( chapter 11) in my view then they'll also nail the unions down and we'll end up with something like:

Bondholders 20/30%

Unions 20/30%

sharholders 1/2% (basically wiped out)

Amercian govt 30/40% ( in exchange for another £20/30bn)

Saab sold, opel sold, vauxhall sold etc.

Unions wound back severely in terms of workers pay and conditions and retirement benefits etc

Plants closed

dealerships closed.

But you never know if they can then produce the right cars, well built and as efficiently as toyota they may stand a chance.

agreed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's just the British Leyland tactic of delaying the end of an essentially dead company by nationalisation/hiving/joint ventures to avert the short-term economic and social shock, but at the cost of a long-term dead weight on the national economy.

GM USA is dead. Not sure how GM Europe will survive the long-term decline in car sales, but it is at least potentially a much better company.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's just the British Leyland tactic of delaying the end of an essentially dead company by nationalisation/hiving/joint ventures to avert the short-term economic and social shock, but at the cost of a long-term dead weight on the national economy.

GM USA is dead. Not sure how GM Europe will survive the long-term decline in car sales, but it is at least potentially a much better company.

Disagree. GM USA will survive and will thrive, once it is shorn of the legacy liabilities which we are learning as a nation, as well as in individual companies, are easy promises to make in good times when the working population is growing and impossible to keep once times turn tough and the size of the workforce is shrinking. Those retiring from 5 years hence to 2030 are going to be the first generation to pay for their retirement twice, unfortunately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   295 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.