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The Plight Of The Downsizers: Record Number Of Middle Classes


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Now that's funny. Lucky they got any windows. The door was an optional extra. The previous owners wanted to take it with them.

Sssshhh! Don't give them ideas!

PS my parents once moved into a house... to find that the previous owners had removed all the lightbulbs :lol:

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I know of two who have downsized both bought in the area they knew and lived in, and another who moved closer to family. One bought a ground floor maisonette with small garden the other two bought two bed bungalows.

Maybe because stairs in the future could be a problem...change and fear for the elderly can sometimes stop them doing what is right for them but none of them have regretted it once they settled in. ;)

Unless people already have, or have good reason to expect mobility problems, I'm not sure bungalows are necessarily a good idea.

My folks moved from a house to a bungalow while they were still relatively young and mobile (mid 60s.) They did not choose the bungalow because of lack of stairs, but because they liked the area and there wasn't much else available.

However, after a couple of years they found that the lack of stairs (and therefore exercise in going up and down all day) had adversely affected their general mobility.

They moved again, to a house with stairs, reasoning that if eventually necessary they'd get a stairlift. The stairs never did become a problem and my mother was still well able to manage them when she moved into a home at 88.

I will admit she was lucky, though.

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I fully share your views on this. In my neighbourhood there are lots of retired people living in 4 bedroom detatched houses who give no indication that they plan to move. Historically, there has been very little churn on properties - at most only 2 properties have come on the market in the last 2 years. A few of them may be feeling the pinch, as a result of food and fuel inflation coupled with negligible returns on their savings, but they will cut their discrentionary spend to the bone rather than uproot and move away from the home that they have lived in for many years. Indeed, with such low interest rates and even lower trust in the banking system, they don't see any point to downsizing just to release cash.

Of course at some stage, the owners will get carried out in a box or be forced by ill health to move into a care home, but most will stay put as long as possible.

The house we bought last year had been owned by a couple in their 90's so this supports your views. That said we intend to live in it until our retirement too !

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If you intervene on the way up then you don't need to intervene on the way down.

that presumes intervention on the way up knows the pitfalls to avoid. A big presumption!

plus, using your own criteria, as we didn't intervene on the way up, we need to intervene on the way down.

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Hospital receptionist Mrs Jordan, 55, said: 'We put the house on the market for £575,000

And she, no doubt, expects another hospital receptionist to buy it with their current earnings.

And that, in a nutshell, is how overvaled your property is Mrs Jordan

edit for quote formatting

Edited by bajista
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The plight of the downsizers: Record number of middle classes desperate to bank the on-paper gains from property, albeit about a year and a half too late

Sorry, but that's how I read it. Houses bought by lots of people are still worth insanely more than they paid for them, and the notion that all that wealth is about to vanish will cause people to try and convert the remaining equity into cash.

So it's a bit like STR, only so late in the game they'll be lucky to get out evens.

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Unless people already have, or have good reason to expect mobility problems, I'm not sure bungalows are necessarily a good idea.

My folks moved from a house to a bungalow while they were still relatively young and mobile (mid 60s.) They did not choose the bungalow because of lack of stairs, but because they liked the area and there wasn't much else available.

However, after a couple of years they found that the lack of stairs (and therefore exercise in going up and down all day) had adversely affected their general mobility.

They moved again, to a house with stairs, reasoning that if eventually necessary they'd get a stairlift. The stairs never did become a problem and my mother was still well able to manage them when she moved into a home at 88.

I will admit she was lucky, though.

Most bungalows come with gardens, mowing the lawn and pruning the roses can do its part in keeping you fit, if not a walk to the shops, or a walk with a dog does the same thing.

It is not unknown for some elderly people to move their beds downstairs into the back room...one even told me they hadn't been upstairs for 3 years.

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However, after a couple of years they found that the lack of stairs (and therefore exercise in going up and down all day) had adversely affected their general mobility.

I fervently agree that the only way to keep your mobility is to use it.

As a GP I'm sometimes faced with concerned relatives who want me to tell grandma that she shouldn't keep going out to the shops on her own etc.

I'm usually very reluctant to do so for exactly this reason.

(Although as the poster above points out, moving to a bungalow doesn't have to mean a decrease in exercise, as long as you compensate in other ways)

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Sorry, but that's how I read it. Houses bought by lots of people are still worth insanely more than they paid for them, and the notion that all that wealth is about to vanish will cause people to try and convert the remaining equity into cash.

So it's a bit like STR, only so late in the game they'll be lucky to get out evens.

Yup -- very lucky indeed.

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  • 439 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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