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A Trip To Thamesmead

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Guest sillybear2
017.jpg

Very apt, hope we will seem more of these trips to the

edges of London.

Very 1984, hidden microphones in the countryside too?

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Guest sillybear2
I wouldn't live in Thamesmead if prices fell 99%. I told you. Last time I went there somebody threw half a house brick at me.

Though I don't doubt your feelings on Thamesmead I dare say your encounter was more the case of the person rather than the place. I'm sure you'd trigger similar Pavlovian responses in the middle of Kensington.

Anyone remember the Black Hyacinth Bucket that appeared on TV about this place?

Reminds me of Prypiat :-

Edited by sillybear2

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well that was pretty depressing.

it really highlights how pointless the last decade was.

Just wait and see how you feel after then next one is over.

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I wouldn't live in Thamesmead if prices fell 99%. I told you. Last time I went there somebody threw half a house brick at me.

What exactly were you doing at the time?

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017.jpg
Very 1984, hidden microphones in the countryside too?

Hidden................

Edited by ccc

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Anyone remember the Black Hyacinth Bucket that appeared on TV about this place?

You mean Nana Akua. She appeared on the Panorama programme last February.

I bought a BTL place in the infamous Tideslea Path that was featured in Panorama. It is one of the penthouse places in the third block (built by Fairclough - now taken over by Miller Homes). Nana was in the first block - the one that was built by Barratt.

I wouldn't have bought a place that I wouldn't live in myself - I expected West Thamesmead to be a dive as the flats were cheap (for London), but I was actually pleasantly surprised when I had a look around there. We spent a few hours walking around the area during the day and at night and went shopping there to get an idea of the type of people who were living there. We came to the conclusion that although it was clear that some of the residents didn't have much money, most of the people were very friendly. People actually talked to us when we were waiting in the queue at Iceland - not typical for in London where they usually just ignore you.

Last time I went there somebody threw half a house brick at me.

Sibley, I'm curious about where you were in Thamesmead and what you were doing at the time to cause such an extreme reaction! :ph34r: The only thing I've had is the kid's shouting "save the planet" as I drive past in my Navara Aventura.

There's a pub just down the road from the flat (Princess Alice) and this was doing a pretty good carvery Mon to Sat for £4.95. They were also doing a pint and a curry for £5, although I've always just went for the carvery. I drove past there last week and they had whacked the carvery down to £3.50, so it's even better value now.

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Guest sillybear2
I wouldn't have bought a place that I wouldn't live in myself - I expected West Thamesmead to be a dive as the flats were cheap (for London), but I was actually pleasantly surprised when I had a look around there. We spent a few hours walking around the area during the day and at night and went shopping there to get an idea of the type of people who were living there. We came to the conclusion that although it was clear that some of the residents didn't have much money, most of the people were very friendly. People actually talked to us when we were waiting in the queue at Iceland - not typical for in London where they usually just ignore you.

You're brave, I remember Nana being mighty pissed when the Nigerians moved in, it's all covered in that FT article earlier up the thread, the mortgage fraud, illegal sub-letting, repo's made it look like something out of Hillbrow in South Africa, but just with larger amounts of money involved. Nice to know where all that bailout money for B&B's mortgage book went I suppose :ph34r:

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You're brave, I remember Nana being mighty pissed when the Nigerians moved in, it's all covered in that FT article earlier up the thread, the mortgage fraud, illegal sub-letting, repo's made it look like something out of Hillbrow in South Africa, but just with larger amounts of money involved. Nice to know where all that bailout money for B&B's mortgage book went I suppose :ph34r:

Well there were a lot of repos in the block where I bought. These were probably from the original people who did the mortgage fraud and ran off with the cash back-hander that they got from the developer. They would then try to rent the place out to anybody they could to get a bit more money in before the bank repossessed the place. I did find, however, that some of these repos were being bought by owner occupiers so this is a good sign. We arrived early and were outside the entrance waiting for the agent when a guy came out of one of the ground floor flats and started chatting to us. He was one of the o/o that purchased a repo.

The company that was managing the estate went bust, so we needed to attend a residents meeting at a nearby school to propose and vote for members of the board of the new residents association. This gave us a chance to size up what the other residents were like. There was a good ethnic mix of people: there was a solitary native white SE Londoner, several other UK people and people from Africa, New Zealand and Asia. Most of the people attending were the owners, although there were a couple of tenants there. The majority of the people were professionals - there was (in no particular order) a nurse, social worker, quanitity surveyor, accountant, senior manager etc. Our tenant was voted in as one of the company directors, so he is taking an active part in the community and he has said he plans to continue to rent our flat for "2 or 3 years". We found a professional couple in their 50's and they like living in the flat too.

Most of the repos I have seen around there had Halifax mortgages - we bought our place from Halifax (pre-auction). My hope is the new people buying the repossessed flats will either be O/O or will be "sensible" BTL people who will secure professional tenants rather than just renting their flat to anybody. Buying into Tideslea was risky, but it offered a better yield than other places I looked at (Ipswich, Colchester, Beckton etc). I looked at occupancy rates for the flats I was interested in. I would go round on a Saturday evening and count the proportion of flats that had lights on - Tideslea had around 65% occupancy, Ipswich was around 50% and 1 estate I looked at in Colchester only had around 35% occupancy! :ph34r:

Poor transport links are one of the biggest drawbacks with Thamesmead - I was hoping that the Thames Gateway Bridge was going to go ahead. Boris Johnson seems to be opposed to this bridge, which is a bit disappointing. Using the Woolwich free ferry is fun, but very slow and there is always some traffic hold-ups between Woolwich and the Blackwall Tunnel. The bridge would only have been around 300m (as the crow flies) from our flat and we were looking forward to seeing the bridge from our balcony. Part of the development around the bridge was supposed to be some bars and restaurants, so this would have been an easy walk along the Thames Path.

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Guest sillybear2
The company that was managing the estate went bust, so we needed to attend a residents meeting at a nearby school to propose and vote for members of the board of the new residents association. This gave us a chance to size up what the other residents were like. There was a good ethnic mix of people: there was a solitary native white SE Londoner, several other UK people and people from Africa, New Zealand and Asia. Most of the people attending were the owners, although there were a couple of tenants there.

That's good, but they've all basically bought into the latest incarnation of socially engineered collectivism, everyone is hostage to the worst residents, or residents/tenants that are unable or unwilling to pay their service charges. That's obviously why the original management company went bankrupt, everyone else is left picking up the tab. Whilst not unusual in London such high density developments are an anathema in other parts of the country, it's easy to see why tens of thousands of these flats lie empty.

Btw, the acid test, would you live there yourself? ;) And not in a "if I had to" sense, would you choose to live there?

Edited by sillybear2

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Very depressing. Would be fascinating to see it juxtaposed with video footage of the egalitarian utopia infused planning meetings that set it all in motion. I bet there's not much evidence of contrition from the architects of these hellholes.

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Guest sillybear2
Very depressing. Would be fascinating to see it juxtaposed with video footage of the egalitarian utopia infused planning meetings that set it all in motion. I bet there's not much evidence of contrition from the architects of these hellholes.

Barratt's computers never show any remorse ;)

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Right that's enough.

I told you lot Thamesmead was a s***hole last month when you were harping on about 60% drops and how you'd love to move to Thamesmead.

It's a nightmare. Everywhere in South London is. I know. I work there.

I wouldn't live in Thamesmead if prices fell 99%. I told you. Last time I went there somebody threw half a house brick at me.

Good luck with the new home if you want to live there.

You sound a tad narked old chep.... :lol:

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In 2007 I carried out a similar exercise to the one in the blog by photographing the area I grew up in.

Like much of Britain it has gone downhill over the years. There's good reason to suspect this has happened all across the UK - just look at those books on Britain's Crappest Towns.

If the British are looking to show a bit of pride and enterprise they could do worse than form local businesses to rennovate areas to undo the neglect. The idea would be to photograph the area, blog it just like above, show it to locals, get them to agree to a plan of action and pay for it to be implemented.

I mean things like jet hosing things like chewing-gum on pavements and mould and vandalism on walls, repainting, removing scrap, planting, pruning and the like. But they can also go further by beautifying an area with innovative ideas like colour lighting schemes to brighten up miserable winter evenings. They actively do this in Singapore and did for a while at Westonbirt Arboretum.

The British so have been obsessesed with the properties they own they turned their backs on both the communities they inhabit and business opportunities to raise their sense of well being.

Here's some people whose pluck I admire.

Guerilla Gardening.

That's something I could never understand - if no-one chooses a property by seeing it in isolation from the area its in, why has there been so much focus individual properties and so little on their settings?

Edited by Dave Spart

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Belvedere and Erith aren't much better.

I worked in Erith for a short while. The stench coming from the industrial plant chimneys was completely overwhelming. Virgina Water it is not.

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nothing says more about labours lost decade than this picture. an advert for aspirational consumerism and one of their orwellian observation towers

utterly depressing

5pijqp.jpg

Edited by pete.hpc

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  • 197 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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