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Steep Rise In Tenant Evictions


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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7903101.stm

Surely tenants should have more protection from being given days notice of eviction as it's not their fault if the slumlord defaults. :angry:

Edited by ʎqɐqɹǝʞɐɥs
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They did say on the news this morning that they're looking at more protection - and they advised all tenants to open all letters marked to The Occupier and not assume it's junk mail, just in case.

They did point out a lot of lenders have no idea there are tenants in the property - and pointed out the slight issue to be overcome is that is the relationships are LL:Tenant, LL:Lender - and there is no relationship between Tenant:Lender.

Maybe all tenants should just squat in the houses and claim their Human Rights... after all, criminals do what they like and then bleat about Human Rights - and this is the PERFECT Human Rights issue.

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7903101.stm

Surely tenants should have more protection from being given days notice of eviction as it's not their fault if the slumlord defaults. :angry:

The concept of borrowing money to buy a property for the sole purpose of letting it out has always been abhorent to me. One of the few worst legacies of the last Tory government.

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'Steep rise' in tenant evictions

There has been a "steep rise" over the last six months in numbers of tenants evicted after landlords defaulted on mortgages, Shelter has warned.

Tenants can get just days' notice to leave their home, says the charity, which wants ministers to "act quickly to give tenants far, far longer".

The government says legislation coming into force in April could entitle tenants to up to seven weeks' notice.

It says it is also considering reforms to give more protection to tenants.

About three million homes in England and Wales are rented from private landlords.

"What we're seeing already is a steep rise in the number of tenants, entirely blameless individuals, who are becoming homeless because their landlords can't pay their mortgage and their homes have been repossessed," said Shelter chief executive Adam Sampson.

"What the government must do is to act quickly to give tenants in those circumstances far, far longer to find themselves somewhere else to live, in a housing market where housing is in desperate short supply."

“ The landlord is often in denial that this is going to happen ”

Ian Potter

Association of Residential Letting Agents

Tenants can have no idea that their landlord is in arrears and be given just days to leave, as was the case for Mike and Karen Smith last year.

"We really liked living there. We had friends there and we didn't want to move," they said.

"We literally spent four days on the internet, ringing up and walking around trying to find somewhere to rent. And trying to do that all - and pack - it was difficult."

The length of warning can depend on the type of mortgage held by the landlord - if it is not a buy-to-let mortgage, the lender might not even know the property has been rented out.

Ian Potter, of the Association of Residential Letting Agents, said: "The landlord is often in denial that this is going to happen and once the court proceedings take place and he's lost his property, he's lost interest and therefore doesn't bother to tell the tenant."

Advice

The government is considering a major overhaul of the sector, although it will not say when this might happen.

"What we are trying to do is to get rid of the unfairness," said housing minister Iain Wright.

"If a tenant is up-to-date with rent and if they're not in arrears, it's unfair that they have their home taken away from them.

"We're trying to work with Shelter and others to protect the tenant as much as possible."

Current advice to tenants is not to ignore post addressed to the occupier, which could contain a valuable warning.

Have you been affected by the themes in this story? Have you faced immediate eviction? Tell us about your experiences.

Story from BBC NEWS:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/uk/7903101.stm

Published: 2009/02/21 08:25:41 GMT

© BBC MMIX

Labour and the Tories before them have had decades to sort the law out on this, and have done precisely nothing. What do they do all day long in Westminster? Read Penthouse or Playgirl?

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Slight digression of topic but the tenancy laws are disgraceful as it is without this. Anyone can be made homeless with 2 months notice with no justification or reason whatsoever. You can't sack someone for no reason so why the hell can you make them homeless.

The law needs to be changed to allow tenants more security. They should be given at least 12 months notice providing they have paid rent etc.

Shameful.

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Maybe all tenants should just squat in the houses and claim their Human Rights... after all, criminals do what they like and then bleat about Human Rights - and this is the PERFECT Human Rights issue.

Tis a bit difficult to assert this (made up) right when there's a burly bailiff with a court order and two policemen in tow outside your door.

tim

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Tenants should have some sort of security in the case of their landlord going bust. They should also be given first refusal to buy their home. They might not be willing or able to do so, but they should be given the opportunity.

Perhaps some clever legal professionals could band together to form a group that protects tenants from eviction by attending evictions and looking for every possible opportunity to sue or prosecute individual bailiffs and their employers if they do not obey the letter of the law, including forgotten ancient laws.

On the BBC News piece on these unjust evictions, they spoke to a man from Shelter who ended by mentioning the 'extreme shortage of supply in the housing market'. What???

Edited by blankster
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Just entered my comment. Not sure what the Beeb does with them.

The law should require due diligence from letting agents. Just as they take references on tenants, they should check landlords. The land registry can confirm whether a property is mortgaged. If it is, the agent should be responsible for ensuring that the lender agrees to be bound by the terms of the tenancy in the event of a repossession, and lenders of course need to be empowered to release that information to an agent or prospective tenant. If that affects the terms of the tenancy, or even prevents it, then so be it.

Making agents liable for tenants costs and damages in the case of failure would help them focus on the issue.

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On the BBC News piece on these unjust evictions, they spoke to a man from Shelter who ended by mentioning the 'extreme shortage of supply in the housing market'. What???

To be fair to the bloke, he's obviously well intentioned, and it's hard not to be under that impression with the amount of ramping for the last 15 years, I'm sure he's genuinely concerned and believes that

Truly shocking state of affairs, if Labour don't do something then their "doing the rights things to help hard-working families" mantra will be exposed as the horseshit it is

On the plus side, this could well be the start of the end for BTL. If similar measures were put in place (which they won't be) to provide a year or whatever's support for having to move out like they have done for homeowners, there simply won't be the enthusiasm to lend to this sector

Die BTL, die. B)

Edited by pete.hpc
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The concept of borrowing money to buy a property for the sole purpose of letting it out has always been abhorent to me. One of the few worst legacies of the last Tory government.

absolutley!!!!!

criminalise BTL now!!!! Its just a form of slave trading. They dont just buy the property, they buy the tennent, then they can go round and 'inspect' their property. i looked at a property that had a tennant and the feelings i felt were wrong, no one should be able trade people like that.

The worst thing is if you can then also own the tennents employment rights, ie, their place of work. The worst aspect of that is the hidden chain because it does not have to be direct, its subliminal, but to address it directly, in its simplest form if you own a company that employs someone that is also a tennent of a property you own you have a very evil system in place. All you need then is for all the landlords and employers to share a common understanding to keep rent and pay at such a level that they can seriously control your effective freedom, but worse, even their reproductive rights, seperating male and female slaves in factory and office.

i dont care what anyone says, slavery is rife in our country, ive seen it all really, the way thay speak, you can feel it. i've seen children and you can tell they expect to own slaves, to trade in humans, ive seen children given charge of their parents factories, children in charge of lettings companies. The system is pure evil. The worst is that the slaves accept it as 'the way it is', 'cant choose your friends here'..... I call it the bus stop mentality. total acceptance..

not that its that simple, but thats a simplistic view of what IS happening.

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absolutley!!!!!

criminalise BTL now!!!! Its just a form of slave trading. They dont just buy the property, they buy the tennent, then they can go round and 'inspect' their property. i looked at a property that had a tennant and the feelings i felt were wrong, no one should be able trade people like that.

The worst thing is if you can then also own the tennents employment rights, ie, their place of work. The worst aspect of that is the hidden chain because it does not have to be direct, its subliminal, but to address it directly, in its simplest form if you own a company that employs someone that is also a tennent of a property you own you have a very evil system in place. All you need then is for all the landlords and employers to share a common understanding to keep rent and pay at such a level that they can seriously control your effective freedom, but worse, even their reproductive rights, seperating male and female slaves in factory and office.

i dont care what anyone says, slavery is rife in our country, ive seen it all really, the way thay speak, you can feel it. i've seen children and you can tell they expect to own slaves, to trade in humans, ive seen children given charge of their parents factories, children in charge of lettings companies. The system is pure evil. The worst is that the slaves accept it as 'the way it is', 'cant choose your friends here'..... I call it the bus stop mentality. total acceptance..

not that its that simple, but thats a simplistic view of what IS happening.

And the new tenancy laws only added insult to injury. They could have made a difference to regulation but all they did was let private sector agencies collect cash to sit on a windfall of interest and then not protect tenants. Down here a property agent that has just recently been put in recievership was making tenants sign tenancy agreements that involved repainting their houses (that is a £1,000 job? for a £700 bond). I only found this out because the people who were coming to do the clean up (carpet cleaning lady, house clearance lady, charity shop lady when I was dropping stuff off) all asked me if I had to repaint the flat - I was like. WHAT?

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Ironically, if you stop paying the rent, you have more rights! :blink:

Not if the bank takes over. If you pay your rent to the bank and the bank cashes the cheque (or even asks for it) they are acknowledging you as a tenant and you are under the tenancy laws.

It is only in the situation where you are renting a house bought with an owner occupied mortgage where the bank can do this. However they will exploit the impression (as the CML spokeswoman did on the BBC) that they have this general loophole in reposession cases to evict you with two days notice.

It's still a disgrace that the tenants have to bear the risk for the bank's negligence with the mortgage. The banks have the ability to check for other kinds of fraud and are far better to spot this fraud than a tenant is, and so should bear the risk. Pretending that they are not part of the contract is just that, a pretence.

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