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As my French partner has pointed out to me, her father has never shared his salary details, savings or any other personal finance information with her. Not because he doesn't trust his own daughter but because in France people just don't talk about money.

There's a very good reason for that. Tax avoidance. It's the national sport in France.

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immigration is now a source of concern.

Is NOW a source of concern??? huh?? What about the last 5 decades???? Were the concerned people visionaries who could see the mess the country was headed for, or German Hitler Nazis??

Forget house prices, the only issue in the UK today is that the English can no longer call their country their own.

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Cant say I disagree with your comments. Can I amend my title to

Civilisation is Fücked

That would make an interesting finals question for a philosophy degree, wouldn't it?

'Civilisation is Fücked. Discuss.'

Edited by The Ayatollah Bugheri
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France has its own problems, big problems too, but the central tenet of his article is correct.

As my French partner has pointed out to me, her father has never shared his salary details, savings or any other personal finance information with her. Not because he doesn't trust his own daughter but because in France people just don't talk about money.

When you attend any social event that has both French and British (or American) guests at it you will find the two groups naturally separate. The French groups will talk about food, sex, religion, and politics. Indeed they'll have heated arguments about food, sex, religion and politics and still remain firm friends.

The British will talk about their house prices. It's in the DNA.

:lol::lol::lol: Not any more it ain`t, it has been genetically removed by Great Crash 2 (The Big One). I do seriously wonder what effect crashing house prices and limited shopping due to no credit cards and no shops is going to have on a large section of the population. I think some people are really going to struggle!

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Yes of course you are. People tend to move if they can and they are unhappy with a place or situation. Ergo, most people responding expressing a significant preference between somewhere they live and somewhere they don't will prefer where they live. Your contribution would be more informative if you had been randomly placed between the two countries.

My job was relocated. Is that "random" enough? Did you actually mean "randomly:" or "unexpectedly"? They are not quite the same thing. Anyway, then I carefully decided to stay here, once my contract ended. Sorry about the "uninformative" nature of my contribution: was yours any better?

Are you seriously comparing an edited piece by the London correspondent of Radio France with British people in general? Lame. :lol:

Fair enough. I'll re-phrase it to appeal to the pedants among us: How many British journalists could create a piece that cogent, in a foreign language? Conversely, I know plenty of foreign ones who could do it in English. This guy can, for example. And I can. Can you? Thought not: Lame :lol:

I'm not saying that France or the UK are in general better places to live.

Neither did I. I just said that I felt happier in Paris than in London. Having actually tried both, for a decade. Have you? Thought not: Lame :lol:

Most people happy in a place are so because they feel they occupy a valued role there and have good relationships with sexual partners, family, friends and work colleagues. Whether this happy situation occurred because of particular qualities of that place is a different matter. However, they will often associate their success with particular qualities of the place and of course the selection of anecdotes that are brought up are hugely subject to their confirmation bias.

I completely agree with that paragraph. Fair point.

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Yes and their teens are rapidly adopting a binge drinking model.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/200...anddrink.france

And what is wrong with that? There has always been "binge drinking", except, before this phrase was invented, it used to be called just "drinking".

I'd rather have this than "binge lending", or "HPI" or "QE" or "managed inflation" or whatever the "answer" to the truly immoral debt "binge" is this week... <_<

Edited by Shao Kahn
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And what is wrong with that? There has always been "binge drinking", except, before this phrase was invented, it used to be called just "drinking".

I'd rather have this than "binge lending", or "HPI" or "QE" or "managed inflation" or whatever the "answer" to the truly immoral debt "binge" is this week... <_<

It's not just drinking though is it? I don't know how old you are but I can remember going out in my mad youth and getting pretty drunk on occasion. Most times we couldn't afford to get too leathered as it was expensive.

Teens are going out now and getting totally out of control drunk leading to health problems, accidents and violence.

It's gone from being the general exuberance of youth to a large social problem.

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Not having a go at anyone in particular, but isn't it just as gauche to talk about how much better it is in France than to boast about how much your house is worth?

It certainly is! However, nobody on this thread seems to be claiming "it" is BETTER in France. Personally, my comment just indicated that I, myself, feel happier here in Paris than in London: despite the strikes and dog$hit!

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My job was relocated. Is that "random" enough? Did you actually mean "randomly:" or "unexpectedly"? They are not quite the same thing.

I meant randomly, as in we perform an experiment where we randomly situate people and force them to stay put. Then we see who prefers where. Since you chose to stay, you are clearly more likely to prefer your life in Paris all other things being equal. The point I was making is that comments on a thread like this are generally all self-selected and therefore not representative. I was not seriously suggesting treating you as a lab rat.

Anyway, then I carefully decided to stay here, once my contract ended. Sorry about the "uninformative" nature of my contribution: was yours any better?
It made a substantive point about selection bias. If you want an opinion on London/Paris, I would prefer London because I met a divine girl from their, am sipping a glass of wine and about to visit a jazz club. (no not really).
Fair enough. I'll re-phrase it to appeal to the pedants among us: How many British journalists could create a piece that cogent, in a foreign language? Conversely, I know plenty of foreign ones who could do it in English. This guy can, for example. And I can. Can you?
If I lived in Paris for three years to polish up my French and research the country, and was provided with a French editor, damn right I could. If I was one of those who actually studied French, had Francophone relations or previous residencies, i.e. exactly the sort of people that spend three years being a foreign correspondent then it would be a piece of piss.

Your point remains poor. Aside from the fact that your amazement at this feat of linguistics is rather bizarre, there are obvious and good reasons why there might be more good Anglophone French than Francophone English aside from general characteristics of society (humility!) that you try to support with this comparison.

Neither did I. I just said that I felt happier in Paris than in London. Having actually tried both, for a decade. Have you? Thought not: Lame :lol:

Never mind that you can't seem to keep up with basic reading comprehension in English (no wonder you are so impressed Monsieur Monin). If I say that I am judging living in France vs England in general when prefacing a remark it does not imply that I think you were saying that. Further, whether I have lived in Paris and London for a decade each or not is irrelevant to anything I said, since I specifically avoided making a comparison between them.

I completely agree with that paragraph. Fair point.

And for all I know I would agree with you about Paris.

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I object to the article on the grounds that the poor sod works in London, which is a bleak, depressing sink hole where there simply isn't anything to talk about except money, teenage knife murders and how black the filthy air makes your snot go.

:lol::lol:

With house prices out of favour there are still mobile phones to talk about.

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As an englishman living in Tunisia which is a francophile country and meeting lots of french I find that they have borrowed and spent at a smilliar level especially in Paris and the indemand cities.

You try and be an average guy and buy an average house with no gift from parents in France its the same.

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That idea derives from 'American dream' ideology originally - Thatcher only appropriated it.

Not quite - John Wesley and the early Quakers were keen on it.

I had to smile at his multi-culti dig. Islam is taking quite a hold over there. It might not be too long till the famous French beaches are covered with covered women.

Maybe we do live under a just God. Could loss of your country to "les beurs"be the final payback for killing a million Algerians?

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...comments on a thread like this are generally all self-selected and therefore not representative.

True, I suppose. The very name of this site tends to reduce the sample-size and concentrate the opinions of people who already have a common point of view.

Never mind that you can't seem to keep up with basic reading comprehension in English
I would prefer London because I met a divine girl from their

Presumably you mean "there"? :lol:

If I lived in Paris for three years to polish up my French and research the country, and was provided with a French editor, damn right I could. If I was one of those who actually studied French, had Francophone relations or previous residencies, i.e. exactly the sort of people that spend three years being a foreign correspondent then it would be a piece of piss.

OK, I believe you. Now let's see you go ahead and actually do it. It's easier to believe somebody is "damn right" if they can actually prove it.

Your point remains poor.

Yeah, I respect your right to that opinion.

whether I have lived in Paris and London for a decade each or not is irrelevant to anything I said[...]

However, it IS relevant to everything that I said; because I have done it. So, although my "point remains poor" I suppose it does have the considerable advantage of being based upon experience. What, precisely, is yours based upon?

And for all I know I would agree with you about Paris.

I suspect that may be true. However, I guess the only way to find out for sure is for you to do as I suggested above: try it. And then write an article about it. In French. Seriously, give it a try! It's a "piece of piss" once you've learned the language and the culture. Within "three years".

I wish you all the best - honestly. No harm in a respectable joust on the forum; and you are a worthy adversary who deserves respect, and has mine.

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