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Or when driving going out of my way to let people in.

As long as you don't do it with pedestrians, in case some boy racer comes flying along the other way and mows them down. Then how would you feel. :(

EDIT: typo

Edited by Ethel
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You can check out their web cam at http://www.ex-tokyo.com/webcam.htm , looks like some dude is falling asleep at the bar ,

been too long since I have been there , portions waaaaay too big ......

i used to eat two of those meals , im 12 stone not 24 stone by the way. tthen it was off to seventh heaven for an expensive purv up, shagged most of them tho. the ex bar dump the next day was spectacular.

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Guest mattsta1964

Whever I read articles like that, i'm reminded of George Carlin's excellent comedy on the utter decadence and folly of mankind.

The UK and America in particular, have lived in a weird parallel universe for decades, spending money we don't have on zhit we don't need.

Carlin joked about 'Saving the planet'

The breathtaking arogance and stupidity of mankind

'Ask those people in Pompeii who are frozen in time, encased in white hot ash, whether they were thinking about 'saving the planet'

'Or the Hawaiians who build their homes on the slopes of a volcano and then wonder why there is lava flowing through their living room.

He finished up by remarking.......

'Don't worry about the planet going anywhere soon. The planet isn't going anywhere. WE ARE

PACK YOUR ZHIT PEOPLE

You're going away'

I suppose the same can be said for the dire state of the economy and the dire quality of the politicians we elect to rule our lives.

Let's face it, through our own ignorance, stupidity, apathy or sheer greed, we got what was coming to us.

We allowed these dumb, stupid cocksuckers to spend our future inheritance. They have left our children and the the rest of us a pretty ghastly future.

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I have been saying out loud for the last few years WHENEVER I met with poor service or idiocy of the private and public sector - "what we need is damn good recession".

Couldn't care less, don't give a damn, don't care, not my job to deal with it, the Govt should do something, I will just put it on the credit card, I am a properdee developer, BTL is my pension".

All phrases that characterise the moral and financial bankruptcy of the UK.

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I think we can forgive the french for a bit of smugness here- they've been sneered at by the brits and the yanks for a decade for being 'stuck in the past.'

True, but for the frogs to say we have a problem with multiculturalism is a ripe as some really smelly french cheese. Paris riots anyone?

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Spot on.

I have longed dreamt of a move to Narbonne for the climate/geography but underlined by this point. People in the UKplc have lost the art of conversation and debate. They hate opinions and shy away from good natured discussion on matters that involve a degree of thought.

I find it cringe inducing talking to certain friends when you end up in a game of boast tennis, not really listening to the other person and seeing which nuggets you can drop into a conversation to reassure you that you are better off and almost by proxy a better person than the person you are talking to. What ********.

UK culture is as flat as a fart. In fact it is a fart repackaged and brought on the never never.

So true.

Here in Germany, conversations which I have with friends feature around real life and people, food, travel, children, opinions, philosophy, science etc.

When Im in the UK, its never too long before the conversation turns to TV shows and their "in jokes" catch phrases and the like.

Thank God fate engineered that I leave the UK.

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Guest X-QUORK
The British will talk about their house prices. It's in the DNA.

I've got Irish blood, I think that's why I always want to discuss fiddles an da loike.

Some HUGE generalisations being presented in this thread.

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The original article and many of the followups are wrong.

Because they start from this premise that all everyone in the UK does is show off about their material possessions, and that they have nothing else to discuss, and that people judge each other by the amount of "bling" they are wearing/driving etc.

I don't know *anyone* who, on meeting up, fills me in on their new TV, car or whatever.

Who are all these people? I don't drive a new car, although I could easily afford one if I so chose.

I don't worry or even think that people look down on me because of my 8 year old Peugeot 306. Or my 46 year old Humber, for that matter.

I don't have a plasma telly, and not one friend has expressed disgust or derision at this.

I usually go to fairly cheap places on holiday - no round the world cruises, or 5 star hotels. I probably could, but I don't see the point.

Of all the people I know, none of them go on about how much they earn, or their flash cars. From this I conclude that the assertion that everyone in the UK is utterly shallow and materialistic is b0llocks.

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So true.

Here in Germany, conversations which I have with friends feature around real life and people, food, travel, children, opinions, philosophy, science etc.

When Im in the UK, its never too long before the conversation turns to TV shows and their "in jokes" catch phrases and the like.

Thank God fate engineered that I leave the UK.

I can't ever recall reading a single thread on here, or anywhere else on the web that I frequent where people are debating how good strictly come dancing is.

Except when we are slagging off MP's for talking about it in the house instead of fixing the feckin economy...

There are many, many brits posting on topics that don't revolve eastenders etc. Some of us still even read books, for fun!

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I don't necessarily agree with the article, but probably the most revolting thing I have ever heard is that our idea of reconciliation in N Ireland is to pay everyone off with twelve grand. I mean, that is so f*cking morally desolate that when I first heard it I thought it must be a joke.

But it gets worse....

Everyone objects to this, but not because money has no f*cking relation to lives but because they don't agree with who gets it. So the government are [email protected] of the first order, but so are all the media nd people who simply argue about the shareout.

I have yet to hear ANYONE in the media savage this diisgusting idea, so maybe the author is right and the country is officially sh1t.

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I don't necessarily agree with the article, but probably the most revolting thing I have ever heard is that our idea of reconciliation in N Ireland is to pay everyone off with twelve grand. I mean, that is so f*cking morally desolate that when I first heard it I thought it must be a joke.

But it gets worse....

Everyone objects to this, but not because money has no f*cking relation to lives but because they don't agree with who gets it. So the government are [email protected] of the first order, but so are all the media nd people who simply argue about the shareout.

I have yet to hear ANYONE in the media savage this diisgusting idea, so maybe the author is right and the country is officially sh1t.

Probably got nothing to do with reparation, the govt are will just be doing it so they go out and spunk the money on cars to help the economic recovery in NI.

I have a suspicion that peace in NI has in some part been bought with public sector jobs. If these have to be culled it could sadly all flare up again.

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Probably got nothing to do with reparation, the govt are will just be doing it so they go out and spunk the money on cars to help the economic recovery in NI.

I have a suspicion that peace in NI has in some part been bought with public sector jobs. If these have to be culled it could sadly all flare up again.

Perhaps true, but the fact remains that whatever their motives the media have not identified the utter desolation of the concept, which speaks volumes imo.

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As a Brit living in Paris, on a modest wage, I am so much happier than I was in London (on a huge salary- ten years ago). Don't get me wrong: I know France has its problems. Tomorrow, for example, the whole country is grinding to a halt because of a strike - that's pretty annoying. However, every time I return to the UK (London or elsewhere) I am reminded of how lucky I am to call Paris, "home"..

Through sheer hard graft, I learned how to speak their language and understand their culture. As well, or better than the French themselves do; just like the journalist who wrote the article that the OP quoted. Honestly, how many British people could write an article like that in French - or any other language? Not because "it's a useless language - nobody speaks it in business," - but just for the cultural challenge of trying a new language? Humility is such a useful trait; in business and elsewhere...

I remember pulling into Waterloo (when the Eurostar still went there,) having had an amazing 2-hour conversation during the journey from Paris with a divine French girl of about 20. She symbolised everything that I love about France: she was beautiful, clever and utterly cultured. Unlike some English girls of that age, she wasn't at all wary or cautious about talking to me. We talked about books, food and politics. (Yes, I do still see her :rolleyes: ) It was her first trip to England as an adult. As we arrived in London, the train stopped just outside Waterloo, while a local commuter train made its exit to those lovely grimy suburbs. That train, too, stopped. We found ourselves right next to a stationary carriage full of people in suits. A window in the other train was lowered and a commuter proceeded to puke voluminously, all over the side of the train, right opposite our window - all of 50cm away. All the time gurgling and swilling from a can of beer. A suit-wearing commuter, presumably a well-paid professional. It happened to be a woman.

I know it's not that amazing to see someone chuck-up because they've been binge-drinking. Well, it is unheard of here in Paris: but in the UK, it is not that unusual. But what a welcome for a French person to a weekend in the UK! A metaphor for decadent consumerism?

I'm enjoying a glass of wine and then I'm heading out to a Jazz club here in Paris, so "santé" to everyone at HPC! Between the UK and France, I know where I feel happier, and I'm looking forward to another decade on the continental side of the Channel.

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Perhaps true, but the fact remains that whatever their motives the media have not identified the utter desolation of the concept, which speaks volumes imo.

When the Daily Mail thinks the amount of sympathy you get depends on how much your house is worth, sadly it's to be expected. In the same way they spectacularly missed the point with the Ross/Brand affair. Focusing on the misdemeanour being the fact it was broadcast, as if, if it hadn't been ringing up a pensioner and shouting that at him would still be ok.

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When the Daily Mail thinks the amount of sympathy you get depends on how much your house is worth, sadly it's to be expected. In the same way they spectacularly missed the point with the Ross/Brand affair. Focusing on the misdemeanour being the fact it was broadcast, as if, if it hadn't been ringing up a pensioner and shouting that at him would still be ok.

Actually, that's a good point! I'd never thought about it that way, but you're spot-on. Why is the "broadcast" part even an issue?!

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Agree entirely with the eloquent argument presented by the writer in the OP's post.

To me, the sign of Britian now should be that of an estate agents or letting agents board.

With the main sign removed, and the pole holding it snapped in two.

Then, cross the two pieces of broken wood and stick the sign at the head of it.

Hey presto, an instant skull and crossbones warning of the death of this industry that represents everything rotten about this country.

We HPCers should create these artifacts en mass, leaving them outside the doors of every bank, estate agency and government office across Britain.

Call it non-violent direct action!

Got the idea from an act I carried out two years ago when wrecked, putting the totem outside the office of a major chain of EAs who had repeatedly been rude to me...

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Guest X-QUORK
As a Brit living in Paris, on a modest wage, I am so much happier than I was in London (on a huge salary- ten years ago). Don't get me wrong: I know France has its problems. Tomorrow, for example, the whole country is grinding to a halt because of a strike - that's pretty annoying. However, every time I return to the UK (London or elsewhere) I am reminded of how lucky I am to call Paris, "home"..

Through sheer hard graft, I learned how to speak their language and understand their culture. As well, or better than the French themselves do; just like the journalist who wrote the article that the OP quoted. Honestly, how many British people could write an article like that in French - or any other language? Not because "it's a useless language - nobody speaks it in business," - but just for the cultural challenge of trying a new language? Humility is such a useful trait; in business and elsewhere...

I remember pulling into Waterloo (when the Eurostar still went there,) having had an amazing 2-hour conversation during the journey from Paris with a divine French girl of about 20. She symbolised everything that I love about France: she was beautiful, clever and utterly cultured. Unlike some English girls of that age, she wasn't at all wary or cautious about talking to me. We talked about books, food and politics. (Yes, I do still see her :rolleyes: ) It was her first trip to England as an adult. As we arrived in London, the train stopped just outside Waterloo, while a local commuter train made its exit to those lovely grimy suburbs. That train, too, stopped. We found ourselves right next to a stationary carriage full of people in suits. A window in the other train was lowered and a commuter proceeded to puke voluminously, all over the side of the train, right opposite our window - all of 50cm away. All the time gurgling and swilling from a can of beer. A suit-wearing commuter, presumably a well-paid professional. It happened to be a woman.

I know it's not that amazing to see someone chuck-up because they've been binge-drinking. Well, it is unheard of here in Paris: but in the UK, it is not that unusual. But what a welcome for a French person to a weekend in the UK! A metaphor for decadent consumerism?

I'm enjoying a glass of wine and then I'm heading out to a Jazz club here in Paris, so "santé" to everyone at HPC! Between the UK and France, I know where I feel happier, and I'm looking forward to another decade on the continental side of the Channel.

Hmmm...that's all well and good. Doesn't change the fact that Paris is covered in dog sh*t.

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It irratates the hell out of me, it is rude and ignorant and smacks of a how deeply riven consumerism in UK society, i don't even think it is a class thing. I suppose it also reflects the erosion of concentration in our instantaneous google world.

Thank you for reminding me about that great film. I will watch Fight Club this weekend.

Fight Club is a product produced and distributed by that well known bastion of anti-consumerism 20th Century Fox (Prop. R. Murdoch).

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As a Brit living in Paris, on a modest wage, I am so much happier than I was in London (on a huge salary- ten years ago).

Yes of course you are. People tend to move if they can and they are unhappy with a place or situation. Ergo, most people responding expressing a significant preference between somewhere they live and somewhere they don't will prefer where they live. Your contribution would be more informative if you had been randomly placed between the two countries.

Through sheer hard graft, I learned how to speak their language and understand their culture. As well, or better than the French themselves do; just like the journalist who wrote the article that the OP quoted. Honestly, how many British people could write an article like that in French - or any other language? Not because "it's a useless language - nobody speaks it in business," - but just for the cultural challenge of trying a new language? Humility is such a useful trait; in business and elsewhere...

Are you seriously comparing an edited piece by the London correspondent of Radio France with British people in general? Lame. :lol:

I'm not saying that France or the UK are in general better places to live - however I will point out that people in general tend to lack insight into their motivations and to an even greater extent tend to confabulate reasons when talking to others.

Most people happy in a place are so because they feel they occupy a valued role there and have good relationships with sexual partners, family, friends and work colleagues. Whether this happy situation occurred because of particular qualities of that place is a different matter. However, they will often associate their success with particular qualities of the place and of course the selection of anecdotes that are brought up are hugely subject to their confirmation bias.

Edited by mirage
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There is much I agree with in the article, but when he came to the lack of equality, I could only think of the outer suburbs of Paris, where I visit my friend - a black British citizen who was a fully trained software engineer, fluent in French and who after working for a decade in IT for a major drug company, struggled to get ANY kind of employment in Paris.

Those suburbs, full of disaffected French youth, who told me - in pretty good English - that they could see no hope for their future and wanted to move to London, where at least they would have a chance of being judged on what they could do, rather than where they came from.

I would argue that same elements of the French character that make them good dreamers, also allow them to close their eyes and ignore problems under their noses. Britain ain't paradise, and we can learn a lot from France, but the key is to understand our relative strengths.

As well as the disaffected youth in the suburbs, cars on fire etc. I hear of the French Left apparently getting together with some Greek disaffected.

Tomorrow there may be some demonstration in France from the Left. (from memory)

www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/jan/25/france-picnic-protests-apple-pioche (the word 'pioche' had a simbal over the 'o'

which I could not type, it may not register) A little of what could down there. French Toast?

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Guest X-QUORK
Has calling them cheese-eating surrender-monkeys now gone out of fashion?

I've never liked that one, too neocon for my taste.

I actually love Paris, and much of the rest of France. My comment about Parisian dog turds was meant as a light-hearted dig at someone who's become so enamoured as to lose all objectivity.

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