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Whats Wrong With Britain

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buried in the policy document identified on this page is the answer to exactly what is wrong with Britain.

http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandsta...dance/DH_093354

Buried in it you will find "The challenge of offering over 15 million people a care plan" - that is 1 in 4 people, 25% of the population, man woman and child who are going to be offered a care plan.

Why is everybody in this country being encouraged to think of themselves as unable to look after themselves without institutional intervention? Its just ridiculous. It is why our taxes are so high and quite frankly I don't notice people feeling all that much better about themselves for all this insitutional poking and prodding. 15% I could almost live with (particularly with older people and children), but 25% ????

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Sounds like a recipe for disaster. If that many people are dependent on the state, it means the state has ultimate control over every aspect of their lives. This is communism pure and simple.

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It where social services put together a plan of how somebody will be looked after.

The truth is we aren't spending much time looking after each other and that's why most of that 25% will be elderly, nobody wants to wipe their Mum or Dad's backside anymore, they are too busy on holiday busy spending their free money.

Edited by Girly girl

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I would expect AT LEAST 1 in 4 people to end up requiring care of some kind. Wit the eradication of diseases that kill people young, many more will eventually develop Alzheimers, senile dementia or other mental illnesses that mean they can't look after themselves. Longer lives, yes, but what quality?

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daft question perhaps, but what's a "care plan"?

A "care plan" is a social or health based plan that sets out what a person's 'needs' are and how they will be met. It is generally devised between the person, their family, their a professional assessor/social or community worker.

This can range from anything from loneliness (which can be quite debilitating for some people - and affect their health, but in my opinion in general the work should be short and sweet not dragging onto a long term plan so the person has to concentrate on their 'troubles' endlessly, and get a personal budget that people that don't whinge don't, to address it 'personally' rather than be expected to use the existing community resources) to being in a situation where your disability is so great that you can only write with a computer strapped to a sensor on your neck.

Of course, the person with the sensor on their neck will quite legitimately need a lot of help to be able to do the things it takes to feel OK as a person. I don't have a problem with that person having a care plan (or even 2). But I think that for most people this just encourages and rewards whinging and hypochondria.

You will see that this is a policy for people with 'long term conditions' - ie a disabling state that will affect them long term, so that parameter of 15 million people must also be referring to those with a long term condition. Is Britain really that sick? If so, then from a Darwinian perspective my decision to leave this country is a good one.

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I would expect AT LEAST 1 in 4 people to end up requiring care of some kind. Wit the eradication of diseases that kill people young, many more will eventually develop Alzheimers, senile dementia or other mental illnesses that mean they can't look after themselves. Longer lives, yes, but what quality?

Isn't that what every good citizen dreams of? To own lots of stuff and stave of death as long as possible, by any means possible?

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Isn't that what every good citizen dreams of? To own lots of stuff and stave of death as long as possible, by any means possible?

So someone can wipe my bottom. Yeah. Really looking forward to that. Shame they can't get care workers becasue they pay them less than a checkout chick and nobody whats to do it. (and then they cut social service budgets so that there isn't any more money to pay them more) but that is only about 5% of people at most. The rest are doing fine. Its just we feel compelled to act like the control freak 'managers and judges' of other people that this society produces on mass.

EDIT: My problem is, they should focus STRATEGICALLY on less plans and FINANCIALLY on paying care workers more, so that their ever so clever STRATEGY involves delivering the plans AND the resources to implement them for the people who NEED IT. Not just another broad sloppy control measure to idologically tune people toward helplessness, and deliver 3rd rate care by people who are doing it becasue they are desperate for the £7 an hour it pays.

Edited by Elizabeth

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Where does that leave the other 75% of the population? Abandoned? :lol:

Tragically so. And all dealing with the abandonment issues on their own, without a care plan or a bean or an instititutional friend to help them through it. SOB. ;)

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The 25% care figure is not surprising really if it includes geriatric care, which is something many of us might need one day and is part of life in modern society.

What would be interesting to know is what percentage of the population is expected to need a care plan before they reach the age of, say, 70.

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Ok, chill out you lot.

To say one in four people have a long term health condition is not exactly news.

We have marvellous ways to meanlessly extend life so this number will only increase unless true cures are found for the big diseases.

TFH

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MacPrudence G Brown and his cohorts have banned smoking, are on their way to banning drinking and very soon obesity.

The people have supported all this.

All these lives 'saved'

That's why we need the care plans

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Guest sillybear2

I agree, we should start shooting people, starting with the Labour cabinet, then outer party members.

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Does this mean that at anyone time 25% of the population will need a careplan?

If that's the case it will probably take 25% of the population to care for these people whilst the other 50% need to produce something to sell to fund it all.

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Guest sillybear2

The UK is facing a demographic time bomb, people have promised themselves too many unfunded liabilities, indexed linked final salary pensions, the best and most expensive public healthcare.

The older generations and government will rue the day they priced young people out home ownership, the national debt is a liability dumped on the unborn, the problem is they will remain just that, unborn.

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The UK is facing a demographic time bomb, people have promised themselves too many unfunded liabilities, indexed linked final salary pensions, the best and most expensive public healthcare.

The older generations and government will rue the day they priced young people out home ownership, the national debt is a liability dumped on the unborn, the problem is they will remain just that, unborn.

Some of this will have to be tackled with current pensions cut, unfortunately it's the only way to drastically reduce liabilities.

It won't be popular with those already receiving the income but its unfair to expect current contributors to keep paying in to fund a poorer lifestyle for themselves whilst those who didn't pay enough in continue to "live it up" at their expense.

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Guest sillybear2
Some of this will have to be tackled with current pensions cut, unfortunately it's the only way to drastically reduce liabilities.

It won't be popular with those already receiving the income but its unfair to expect current contributors to keep paying in to fund a poorer lifestyle for themselves whilst those who didn't pay enough in continue to "live it up" at their expense.

It'll never happen, people genuinely believe they've being paying into a massive 'pot' and these unfunded liabilites are owed to them, little do they realise they've simply benefited from being in the best position in a pyramid scheme, nobody will accept their benefits being "stolen" from them, nor acknowledge just how expensive they are. I can remember when I explained this to AuntJess, she was under the impression N.I. money was hidden away in a giant pot underneath HM Treasury and I was justifying excuses to steal it.

What will happen is liabilites will be abstracted up a notch to the monetary system itself, just like the bank bailouts, they will keep increasing taxes, accumulate debt and printing money right up until the mirage finally descends into mass civil unrest of what little remains of the working population. However, once the vast majority of people are either dependent on or working for the state there is no escape from the socialist dreamland, and this is the fate that befalls the UK, just an ever grinding down of general living standards and a flat lining 'real' economy.

Edited by sillybear2

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I would expect AT LEAST 1 in 4 people to end up requiring care of some kind. Wit the eradication of diseases that kill people young, many more will eventually develop Alzheimers, senile dementia or other mental illnesses that mean they can't look after themselves. Longer lives, yes, but what quality?

Just interested but can you show me a proper reference that shows we live substantually longer now than 100 years ago?

Are you sure the average age hasnt gone up simply because childhood deaths have bee lowered?

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So who's designing suicide booths?

I got told off on here last time I said that on HPC.

We have to think seriously about allowing people to end their own lives when they felt they had no quality of life left. We have the power to artificailly prolong life well beyond any use or enjoyment of our bodies and yet no doctor or politician is prepared to deal with the questions.

I for one do not want to be imprisoned in a body that no longer functions and have nothing left to live for. We happily say 'its a humane thing to put an animal out of its misery' but we will not let people decide on their own humane death.

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The older generations and government will rue the day they priced young people out home ownership, the national debt is a liability dumped on the unborn, the problem is they will remain just that, unborn.

How right you are. It already happened in Japan and is beginning to happen in the UK and USA except among immigrant populations who are transient and can just as easily go back to their old country.

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Guest sillybear2
What will happen is liabilites will be abstracted up a notch to the monetary system itself, just like the bank bailouts, they will keep increasing taxes, accumulate debt and printing money right up until the mirage finally descends into mass civil unrest of what little remains of the working population.

And it begins :-

£35 billion black hole in council pensions

Householders are paying up to £140 a year in council tax to help fill a £35 billion black hole in town hall pension funds.

The extra money is to bail out pension schemes for local government workers, which have been criticised as “gold-plated” and over-generous.

An investigation by this newspaper raised renewed criticism of the “final salary” pensions offered to council employees. Such pensions have been almost eradicated in the private sector.

The slump in share prices caused by the recession has hit pension fund investments hard and added to the scale of the problem.

Council chiefs admit that the situation was made worse when some local authorities took “pension holidays”, withholding contributions to their funds when the markets were strong.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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