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Uk De Facto Bancruptcy - Prediction Of Bond Market Collapse In April

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Scary stuff, only weeks to prepare!

No manufacturing base, so down the pan.

That unfortunately is a lie, the uk is the 5th largest manufacturer in the world and apart from the gold ramping it was an ok vid....

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Top guy. :)

Anglo irish bank have done the freeze.

Hmmm... he's only a "top guy" if "top guys" do not need to be either accurate or employ sound reasoning.

The Irish bank freeze is not on deposits over $20m - but a freeze on deposits of those with a corresponding debt in excess of $20m. There's a difference.

Similarly, he talks nonsense about hyperinflation - and while I'd tentatively entertain the idea of de facto national bankruptcy, the extrapolations to a necessary economic collapse (inflationary or deflationary) is over-blown. There will be serious repercussions no doubt - but they won't be what this geezer (who I can only assume is on commission for selling precious metals) is saying.

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Hmmm... he's only a "top guy" if "top guys" do not need to be either accurate or employ sound reasoning.

The Irish bank freeze is not on deposits over $20m - but a freeze on deposits of those with a corresponding debt in excess of $20m. There's a difference.

Similarly, he talks nonsense about hyperinflation - and while I'd tentatively entertain the idea of de facto national bankruptcy, the extrapolations to a necessary economic collapse (inflationary or deflationary) is over-blown. There will be serious repercussions no doubt - but they won't be what this geezer (who I can only assume is on commission for selling precious metals) is saying.

Why not?

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That unfortunately is a lie, the uk is the 5th largest manufacturer in the world and apart from the gold ramping it was an ok vid....

Quick Google, possibly not the most up to date info. for 2007. Showed top 12:-

USA, China, Japan, Germany, Russian Fed., Italy, UK (7th)

He seemed such a nice man.

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That unfortunately is a lie, the uk is the 5th largest manufacturer in the world and apart from the gold ramping it was an ok vid....

Just wondering, does the 5th/7th statistic include stuff like manufactured jeans and shirts where they are shipped to the UK and we sew on one button and label it "made in the UK"?

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Quick Google, possibly not the most up to date info. for 2007. Showed top 12:-

USA, China, Japan, Germany, Russian Fed., Italy, UK (7th)

He seemed such a nice man.

do you have the link?

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Why not?

1. The observational facts which he reported were subtly wrong.

2. His extrapolation to predict future events are clearly fantasy - they are an exercise in non sequitur,

3, He is implying that an urgent investment strategy is to ignore the price of assets you acquire - which, given Occams razor, clearly suggests that he is a vested interest.

In short, there are an infinite number of ways in which our current malaise may play out - this guy is suggesting that only one or two are worth considering - yet he does not back up this view with anything more substantial than irrelevant (and factually incorrect) observations designed to be sensationalist.

The pitch is dressed up to make it sound serious - but, frankly, it is no more credible than "Come to the end of the world party - tickets cost you everything you have... but that won't matter, because the world will end anyway." The logical question, of course, is this: if the world will end immediately after the party, why would the organisers want to acquire my cash?

If hyperinflation (or a deflationary spiral to economic collapse) were to arise, owning assets, like owning cash, would likely be pointless - since there would, likely, be no way to defend them. One may as well concentrate on establishing useful skills and knowledge - which can never devalue to zero.

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1. The observational facts which he reported were subtly wrong.

Aye.

2. His extrapolation to predict future events are clearly fantasy - they are an exercise in non sequitur,

Well either deflationary collapse or hyperinflation are all but inevitable and anyone with any sense must have noticed by now that the government thinks it has infinite funds to throw at the banks. Hyperinlfations are all sort of similar - ie. they suck along similar lines.

I agree he didn't make a case for it, though.

3, He is implying that an urgent investment strategy is to ignore the price of assets you acquire - which, given Occams razor, clearly suggests that he is a vested interest.

Or if you think that your paper money is going to be worthless next week, buying anything right now is a good move.

In short, there are an infinite number of ways in which our current malaise may play out - this guy is suggesting that only one or two are worth considering - yet he does not back up this view with anything more substantial than irrelevant (and factually incorrect) observations designed to be sensationalist.

There are only two basic ways for this ot end though and that's a policy decision. You can't really put an economic case for "Gordon brown is a ******ing loon who will print sterling into oblivion" because there isn't one.

The pitch is dressed up to make it sound serious - but, frankly, it is no more credible than "Come to the end of the world party - tickets cost you everything you have... but that won't matter, because the world will end anyway." The logical question, of course, is this: if the world will end immediately after the party, why would the organisers want to acquire my cash?

If hyperinflation (or a deflationary spiral to economic collapse) were to arise, owning assets, like owning cash, would likely be pointless - since there would, likely, be no way to defend them. One may as well concentrate on establishing useful skills and knowledge - which can never devalue to zero.

Oh no! You've gone all Mad Max on me. people suffer in hyperinflations and depressions (and in good times to) because they are overwhelmingly moral. The biker leather petrol hunting fantasy is just that.

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If hyperinflation (or a deflationary spiral to economic collapse) were to arise, owning assets, like owning cash, would likely be pointless - since there would, likely, be no way to defend them. One may as well concentrate on establishing useful skills and knowledge - which can never devalue to zero.

I think he was refering to hyperinflation in the UK only? Is that an unreasonable assertion?

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I think you need to watch all the videos for that.

Yeah I have, I was refering to this video alone. I've seen this guys stuff before.

(Which is why I said top guy before watching all of this one, which is shakier than some of the others.)

Is hyperinflation in the UK solely, an unreasonable assertion?

I'd say it is. The US is going to go through the same thing for pretty much the same reasons. Lord knows what the euro will do - will it remain, will it falter, will it split up and if so along what lines...

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I think he was refering to hyperinflation in the UK only? Is that an unreasonable assertion?

I still think. we are more likly to see a currency crisis (say 50% devaluation of GB peso) and bond market implosion follwed by the IMF medical bill...

e.g they will probably print money to write off the banking debts but the inflation will be brief and coupled with a fall in real economic activity.... e.g iceland 2.0

Edited by jonpo

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Hmmm... he's only a "top guy" if "top guys" do not need to be either accurate or employ sound reasoning.

The Irish bank freeze is not on deposits over $20m - but a freeze on deposits of those with a corresponding debt in excess of $20m. There's a difference.

Similarly, he talks nonsense about hyperinflation - and while I'd tentatively entertain the idea of de facto national bankruptcy, the extrapolations to a necessary economic collapse (inflationary or deflationary) is over-blown. There will be serious repercussions no doubt - but they won't be what this geezer (who I can only assume is on commission for selling precious metals) is saying.

I agree, he's talking ********. For instance RBS has lost £28Billion, therefore all banks are bankrupt. If the UK had the Euro, it would be as ****ed as the PIIGS - but it doesn't and it isn't.

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I agree, he's talking ********. For instance RBS has lost £28Billion, therefore all banks are bankrupt.

That bits actually true though!

The whole system is insolvent.

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I think he was refering to hyperinflation in the UK only? Is that an unreasonable assertion?

Possibly; Yes.

It is a bonkers conjecture that would need a lot of credible support if anyone wanted it to even be discussed as a serious possibility. (There was none.)

It is an utterly unreasonable assertion - since assertions are, by definition, certain.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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