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DementedTuna

Time To Start Stockpiling Food?

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Looking very likely that sterling is about to collapse... it will happen the second the government announces full nationalisation and quantitive easing. These options have been pinging around the media for some time now.

What would be the immediate effect of this on the supply chain? Anyone from the 70's remember what happened last time we went bankrupt? I'm guessing it wouldn't be complete anarchy, the lorries would still do their deliveries, but we'd start to see some serious price hikes with people turning off the gas and cancelling a few of their monthly bills (mobile, internet, sky tv) to save money for food.

I'm more concerned about overnight inflation than anything else... loaf of bread suddenly doubling in price etc. worth getting out of sterling and into food?

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Looking very likely that sterling is about to collapse... it will happen the second the government announces full nationalisation and quantitive easing. These options have been pinging around the media for some time now.

What would be the immediate effect of this on the supply chain?

About to collapse?

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Cheap tinned toms are already 33p everywhere. That's insane. I think stockpiling food was so last year - you've lost out by not buying them!

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Cheap tinned toms are already 33p everywhere.

Toms only ever go up. There is pent up demand. Its a small island, we cannot grow any more toms. Get in now before you miss the boat.

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Looking very likely that sterling is about to collapse... it will happen the second the government announces full nationalisation and quantitive easing. These options have been pinging around the media for some time now.

What would be the immediate effect of this on the supply chain? Anyone from the 70's remember what happened last time we went bankrupt? I'm guessing it wouldn't be complete anarchy, the lorries would still do their deliveries, but we'd start to see some serious price hikes with people turning off the gas and cancelling a few of their monthly bills (mobile, internet, sky tv) to save money for food.

I'm more concerned about overnight inflation than anything else... loaf of bread suddenly doubling in price etc. worth getting out of sterling and into food?

I wouldn't be concerned so much with inflation so much as to whether there will be anything on the shelves. At various times during the 1970's there were shortages of basics (bread, flour, sugar etc). Often this was because of a genuine shortage - but equally it was caused by panic-buying on the strength of nothing more than rumour.

Nobody died of starvation as a result (I like to think Grocer Heath gave us a guiding hand). But the infrastructure for food delivery was very different then. Most people bought daily/weekly from high street shops. Equally, there were many regional/independent retailers and multiple suppliers.

Contrast that with today where many people shop less frequently but buy larger quantities; where distribution is focused on perhaps half a dozen national companies, where just-in-time is the norm, and where access to food distribution requires most people to have a car, and the supply-chain is done nationally.

Some might argue that this is a much more efficient distribution chain but you don't have to be deep-green politically to recognise that national distribution although efficient (in terms of profits) is much more vulnerable to systemic shocks. The likes of Tesco, ASDA et al may have inadvertently created a very fragile chain, and the concentration of food distribution into the hands of a few established national retailers a single-point of failure.

I wouldn't be concerned about price, I would be concerned about continuity of supply.

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Toms only ever go up. There is pent up demand. Its a small island, we cannot grow any more toms. Get in now before you miss the boat.
Housing analogy? Nice one. Many of us were priced out of the housing market for many years during the bubble. What if you get priced out of the food market for that period of time? :ph34r:

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Toms only ever go up. There is pent up demand. Its a small island, we cannot grow any more toms. Get in now before you miss the boat.

:lol::lol::lol:

I like your posts.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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