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pilchardthecat

Thought For The Day

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Too much and for too long, we seemed to have surrendered personal excellence and community values in the mere accumulation of material things. Our Gross National Product, now, is over $800 billion dollars a year, but that Gross National Product - if we judge the United States of America by that - that Gross National Product counts air pollution and cigarette advertising, and ambulances to clear our highways of carnage. It counts special locks for our doors and the jails for the people who break them. It counts the destruction of the redwood and the loss of our natural wonder in chaotic sprawl. It counts napalm and counts nuclear warheads and armored cars for the police to fight the riots in our cities...

Yet the gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages, the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials. It measures neither our wit nor our courage, neither our wisdom nor our learning, neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country, it measures everything in short, except that which makes life worthwhile.

Robert F. Kennedy

University of Kansas

March 18, 1968

Had a point, didn't he?

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Never heard that before. Very good.

No wonder he got gunned down, in country where whispering the word 'liberal' is risky without getting anywhere near the left!

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Guest Steve Cook
Too much and for too long, we seemed to have surrendered personal excellence and community values in the mere accumulation of material things. Our Gross National Product, now, is over $800 billion dollars a year, but that Gross National Product - if we judge the United States of America by that - that Gross National Product counts air pollution and cigarette advertising, and ambulances to clear our highways of carnage. It counts special locks for our doors and the jails for the people who break them. It counts the destruction of the redwood and the loss of our natural wonder in chaotic sprawl. It counts napalm and counts nuclear warheads and armored cars for the police to fight the riots in our cities...

Yet the gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages, the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials. It measures neither our wit nor our courage, neither our wisdom nor our learning, neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country, it measures everything in short, except that which makes life worthwhile.

Robert F. Kennedy

University of Kansas

March 18, 1968

Had a point, didn't he?

yes

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He did have a point, and it's somewhat ironic that one side-effect of the recession/depression/whatever is that many people will come to realise that the most important stuff isn't at the bottom of a bank statement. If only they'd found this out a little bit earlier...

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What a wonderful quote.

He would of been the best president ever.

That sentiment, if followed, would have ensured our society valued our only assets properly. Life, health, family, friends, and our planet.

Thanks for posting that. I too hadn't heard that one.

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What a wonderful quote.

He would of been the best president ever.

That sentiment, if followed, would have ensured our society valued our only assets properly. Life, health, family, friends, and our planet.

Thanks for posting that. I too hadn't heard that one.

The saddest thing, for me at least, is that the media machine doesn't allow any room for real thinkers in public life or politics anymore

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Sentiment like Kennedy's lead the emergence of measures like Gross National Happiness.

You might also find this interesting too. I guess much of this is niche thinking but it does shed lght on the nasty neolithic nature of those vested interests who have exploited their positions of power to ramp the property market - Anne Ashworth for instance.

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Remember that our addiction to growth in material consumption is not a psychological or moral phenomenon:

It is a built in feature of a monetary system where money is generated as debt and then interest charged, such that the amount of money owed to the banks at any time is greater than the sum of positive balances in existence.

The only way to "sustain" such a system is for ever increasing amounts of money to be borrowed into existence.

Hence the need for perpetual "growth" is mathematical, not psychological.

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Guest theboltonfury
Yes he would have been the best president ever...thats why he was shot.

I bet Obama is looking over his shoulder these days. No open top cars for him!

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Never heard that before. Very good.

No wonder he got gunned down, in country where whispering the word 'liberal' is risky without getting anywhere near the left!

....I remember were I was when I heard that the second Kennedy had been shot. My brother fixing his Ford Pop as usual (one of the old black ones made in the 50's but looking like something out of the 30's!)....unusually hot day in Spalding, smell of melting tar.

I started reading that and thinking 'do they still make napalm!? Perhaps he was 40 years too early.

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I thought that was because he was intent on going after those who killed his brother. They got to him first.

Who did? What evidence do you have that Sirhan Sirhan did anything other than act alone?

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Remember that our addiction to growth in material consumption is not a psychological or moral phenomenon:

It is a built in feature of a monetary system where money is generated as debt and then interest charged, such that the amount of money owed to the banks at any time is greater than the sum of positive balances in existence.

The only way to "sustain" such a system is for ever increasing amounts of money to be borrowed into existence.

Hence the need for perpetual "growth" is mathematical, not psychological.

I think it's both, that's why we're really up against it! But if you can win the psychological battle to a certain extent, avoiding the debt treadmill becomes easy.

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I think it's both, that's why we're really up against it! But if you can win the psychological battle to a certain extent, avoiding the debt treadmill becomes easy.

True.

It always bothers me though when people address the moral issue without considering the mathematical one.

Too often those who advocate "simple living" - I'm thinking of archbishops and gurus, for instance - fail to acknowledge that the consequence of their advice being followed would be the collapse of our monetary / financial system, with mass insolvency.

Now you might argue that that would be a good thing, and I have some sympathy with that view. But it needs to be made clear that that is what they are proposing.

As for avoiding the debt treadmill, yes it is easy for the enlightened few to do it, but, as above, a mathematical impossibilty for the masses to do it without catastrophic social consequencs.

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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