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I dont wish to be harsh but I have little sympathy for those who get made redundant and moan

In these troubled times you should prepare for the worse and make sure you have sufficient capital for your needs and alternative stratagy for earning money, not simply relying on your employer to provide or the state. Quite frankly apart from the seriously ill I would not have any form of state handouts

Quite frankly the worse it gets the better the financial position of those of us who STR. I am now thinking that 60 -70% falls may be nearer the truth. We currently rent a large house in the catchment area of the best school in the county for £2,250 per month. and the landlord has been dropping hints that they would sell for £750k; it was worth £900k last year and if things go the way I feel they will I am looking forward to looking him in the face and offering £350K cash.That moment would be priceless

I work for a firm of accountants that specilise in bankruptcy and receivership and I have a business on the side doing maintenance work for blocks of flats in my area. We have an agreement with the owner of teh blocks of flats and our contracts are very secure. My wife works part time in the police and runs an internet mail order company specilising in cheap clothes and household items and is doing very well. We saw the downturn and took appropriate steps to ensure that we were in secure jobs with a secure fall back position. We save over 60% of our net income and have two children under 12 years of age. We both left school at 16 and jsut rolled up our selves and got on with it. Apart from the money we will inherit from our parents we have had no lucky breaks

What I fear is that the government will take pity on those who have over extended and keep interest rates low which effects my STR fund and stops the correction we all are hoping for. We also need to get rid of these meaningless jobs and start on manufacturing to create wealth and this will need in my opinion a realisation that if we are to become competitive then the minimum wage should be abolished.

There will for sure be initialy much pain but prices/incomes/rents etc will then fall into kilter.

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I dont wish to be harsh but I have little sympathy for those who get made redundant and moan

huh? what do you think people will be happy? Not every body has the luxury of a secure job, if i lose mine i reserve the right to bitch and moan. No sympathy? No sympathy for those who've built a life dedicated to a craft to have see all they know wiped out? No sympathy because people have been f++cked over by a govt

Quite frankly the worse it gets the better the financial position of those of us who STR.
I work for a firm of accountants that specilise in bankruptcy and receivership and I have a business on the side doing maintenance work for blocks of flats in my area. We have an agreement with the owner of teh blocks of flats and our contracts are very secure. My wife works part time in the police and runs an internet mail order company specilising in cheap clothes and household items and is doing very well.

oh i see, you're alright jack.

hope your cyclical business serves you well.

Edited by slurms mackenzie

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the only difference between an str and a btl is one got lucky with the market so don't be too smug!

having said that, i do appreciate the guts it takes to sell up and i'm busy saving for a deposit but in london that might still take a while. we'll see!

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I dont wish to be harsh but I have little sympathy for those who get made redundant and moan

In these troubled times you should prepare for the worse and make sure you have sufficient capital for your needs and alternative stratagy for earning money, not simply relying on your employer to provide or the state. Quite frankly apart from the seriously ill I would not have any form of state handouts

Quite frankly the worse it gets the better the financial position of those of us who STR. I am now thinking that 60 -70% falls may be nearer the truth. We currently rent a large house in the catchment area of the best school in the county for £2,250 per month. and the landlord has been dropping hints that they would sell for £750k; it was worth £900k last year and if things go the way I feel they will I am looking forward to looking him in the face and offering £350K cash.That moment would be priceless

I work for a firm of accountants that specilise in bankruptcy and receivership and I have a business on the side doing maintenance work for blocks of flats in my area. We have an agreement with the owner of teh blocks of flats and our contracts are very secure. My wife works part time in the police and runs an internet mail order company specilising in cheap clothes and household items and is doing very well. We saw the downturn and took appropriate steps to ensure that we were in secure jobs with a secure fall back position. We save over 60% of our net income and have two children under 12 years of age. We both left school at 16 and jsut rolled up our selves and got on with it. Apart from the money we will inherit from our parents we have had no lucky breaks

What I fear is that the government will take pity on those who have over extended and keep interest rates low which effects my STR fund and stops the correction we all are hoping for. We also need to get rid of these meaningless jobs and start on manufacturing to create wealth and this will need in my opinion a realisation that if we are to become competitive then the minimum wage should be abolished.

There will for sure be initialy much pain but prices/incomes/rents etc will then fall into kilter.

If the above truly reflects your opinion, and your not just having a bad day, you are a nob.

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Ah, but you never know what's round the corner. Those of us who are OK today will probably be OK tomorrow, but what about the day after tomorrow? How safe is your pension, for instance?

18 months ago we were saving 50% of our joint income each month - now we save nothing. But we do at least own our house outright (scrimped and saved to pay mortgage off 11 years early)

Edited by blankster

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I dont wish to be harsh but I have little sympathy for those who get made redundant and moan

In these troubled times you should prepare for the worse and make sure you have sufficient capital for your needs and alternative stratagy for earning money, not simply relying on your employer to provide or the state. Quite frankly apart from the seriously ill I would not have any form of state handouts

Quite frankly the worse it gets the better the financial position of those of us who STR. I am now thinking that 60 -70% falls may be nearer the truth. We currently rent a large house in the catchment area of the best school in the county for £2,250 per month. and the landlord has been dropping hints that they would sell for £750k; it was worth £900k last year and if things go the way I feel they will I am looking forward to looking him in the face and offering £350K cash.That moment would be priceless

I work for a firm of accountants that specilise in bankruptcy and receivership and I have a business on the side doing maintenance work for blocks of flats in my area. We have an agreement with the owner of teh blocks of flats and our contracts are very secure. My wife works part time in the police and runs an internet mail order company specilising in cheap clothes and household items and is doing very well. We saw the downturn and took appropriate steps to ensure that we were in secure jobs with a secure fall back position. We save over 60% of our net income and have two children under 12 years of age. We both left school at 16 and jsut rolled up our selves and got on with it. Apart from the money we will inherit from our parents we have had no lucky breaks

What I fear is that the government will take pity on those who have over extended and keep interest rates low which effects my STR fund and stops the correction we all are hoping for. We also need to get rid of these meaningless jobs and start on manufacturing to create wealth and this will need in my opinion a realisation that if we are to become competitive then the minimum wage should be abolished.

There will for sure be initialy much pain but prices/incomes/rents etc will then fall into kilter.

I don't usually post here, more of a browser myself but I do agree that OP is a nob. Just think, if everyone done what you said you have, you would just be as f**ked as everyone else so don't complain about it!

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I dont wish to be harsh but I have little sympathy for those who get made redundant and moan

In these troubled times you should prepare for the worse and make sure you have sufficient capital for your needs and alternative stratagy for earning money, not simply relying on your employer to provide or the state. Quite frankly apart from the seriously ill I would not have any form of state handouts

Quite frankly the worse it gets the better the financial position of those of us who STR. I am now thinking that 60 -70% falls may be nearer the truth. We currently rent a large house in the catchment area of the best school in the county for £2,250 per month. and the landlord has been dropping hints that they would sell for £750k; it was worth £900k last year and if things go the way I feel they will I am looking forward to looking him in the face and offering £350K cash.That moment would be priceless

I work for a firm of accountants that specilise in bankruptcy and receivership and I have a business on the side doing maintenance work for blocks of flats in my area. We have an agreement with the owner of teh blocks of flats and our contracts are very secure. My wife works part time in the police and runs an internet mail order company specilising in cheap clothes and household items and is doing very well. We saw the downturn and took appropriate steps to ensure that we were in secure jobs with a secure fall back position. We save over 60% of our net income and have two children under 12 years of age. We both left school at 16 and jsut rolled up our selves and got on with it. Apart from the money we will inherit from our parents we have had no lucky breaks

What I fear is that the government will take pity on those who have over extended and keep interest rates low which effects my STR fund and stops the correction we all are hoping for. We also need to get rid of these meaningless jobs and start on manufacturing to create wealth and this will need in my opinion a realisation that if we are to become competitive then the minimum wage should be abolished.

There will for sure be initialy much pain but prices/incomes/rents etc will then fall into kilter.

Um, okay...

The internet's a strange medium, don't you find? Sometimes, what you write comes over in a totally different way.

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What I fear is that the government will take pity on those who have over extended and keep interest rates low which effects my STR fund and stops the correction we all are hoping for.

Ok, so you have made money out of the housing boom, err I mean housing con, and you dont think it would be right for your "money" to be eroded?

Personally, I don't take pity unless it's someone who has lost their own hard-worked for money.

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"nob" isn't a word that i have ever used before. But in this case, to join the majority, yes, I agree the OP is a nob. Mr/s what ever your name is, there is a number of us who have found ourselves in a fortunate position for selling at the right time and can make a good deal in the future; but that does not mean we make offensive remarks about honest workers who have lost their jobs and might not have been earning enough before to save up several months' worth of earnings for a rainy day. Quite frankly, we must have some sympathy.

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Quite frankly the worse it gets the better the financial position of those of us who STR.

not really, unless you have moved your funds out of sterling.

otherwise this monster is eating your £ savings at quite a decent rate.

sucker !!

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make sure you have sufficient capital for your needs and alternative stratagy for earning money, not simply relying on your employer to provide or the state.

and yet your wife is employed by the state

btw, tax is theft and when state sector employees receive their pay they are handling stolen goods.

My wife works part time in the police

and she's in the filth

Edit spell

Edited by InternationalRockSuperstar

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What I fear is that the government will take pity on those who have over extended and keep interest rates low which effects my STR fund and stops the correction we all are hoping for.

In what way are interest rates affecting your STR fund?

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If the above truly reflects your opinion, and your not just having a bad day, you are a nob.

why exactly?

in fact, if the country is ever going to be on an even rational keel, it is necessary that people actually start thinking ahead for the rainy days as well as the boom times.

there are millions that have almost NO protection against hard times.

the country will never be able to grow healthily if the people don't take healthy precautions themselves.

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I don't usually post here, more of a browser myself but I do agree that OP is a nob. Just think, if everyone done what you said you have, you would just be as f**ked as everyone else so don't complain about it!

Cavester. I think you need to direct that away from Mega and towards the correct poster.

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why exactly?

in fact, if the country is ever going to be on an even rational keel, it is necessary that people actually start thinking ahead for the rainy days as well as the boom times.

there are millions that have almost NO protection against hard times.

the country will never be able to grow healthily if the people don't take healthy precautions themselves.

'some' people barely earn enough to get by without the luxury of affording a home of their own, a pension. nevermind saving for a rainy day. what the posters view doesnt acount for are differences between the ones who might be lucky and have two incomes, one of which being a state one, and those that are quite simply dirt poor, un educated and un skilled.

it would be very nice if we could all afford these things, but perhaps he doesnt appreciate the comfortable position he has landed for himself. had he been born and then brought up badly in poverty on a sink estate, perhaps things and opportunities in life may have been different.

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why exactly?

in fact, if the country is ever going to be on an even rational keel, it is necessary that people actually start thinking ahead for the rainy days as well as the boom times.

there are millions that have almost NO protection against hard times.

the country will never be able to grow healthily if the people don't take healthy precautions themselves.

Due to the high cost of living over here, and the fact that most people arent on massive salaries, it becomes extremely difficult for them to be able to do this. Not everyone can make a speculative decision to STR and cash in many thousands or even hundreds of thousands, many people don't even have a house to sell!

Perhaps you could say that the older people, say over 45, would be in a position to do this, but for those who have started work in the last ten years or so, they would not be able to do this, unless they were very lucky and had the luxury of landing a very well paid job very early on.

It is even worse for single people like myself, as we don't qualify for any forms of tax credits whatsoever, or indeed any assistance. It seems that everyone like me would be better off packing it all in, declaring bankruptcy and throwing in the towel.

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they are paying his STR savings at a rate far below the real level of uk inflation.

Easy come easy go.

No good pissing and moaning about it.

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I work for a firm of accountants that specilise in bankruptcy and receivership and I have a business on the side doing maintenance work for blocks of flats in my area. We have an agreement with the owner of teh blocks of flats and our contracts are very secure. My wife works part time in the police and runs an internet mail order company specilising in cheap clothes and household items and is doing very well. We saw the downturn and took appropriate steps to ensure that we were in secure jobs with a secure fall back position. We save over 60% of our net income and have two children under 12 years of age. We both left school at 16 and jsut rolled up our selves and got on with it. Apart from the money we will inherit from our parents we have had no lucky breaks

So accounting services, property contracts, public sector, and retail ... very British of you ;)

Hardly likely to work for everyone currently losing their jobs though.

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why exactly?

in fact, if the country is ever going to be on an even rational keel, it is necessary that people actually start thinking ahead for the rainy days as well as the boom times.

there are millions that have almost NO protection against hard times.

the country will never be able to grow healthily if the people don't take healthy precautions themselves.

GingerWhinger's comments are highhanded and smug, two charachteristics that I dislike. As others have pointed out, many live hand to mouth, I know plenty of families to whom the £25 per term asked for by school to pay for swimming lessons was a struggle. I know one set of parents who both work in low paid jobs (shoe shop /delivery driver), who have never had the chance to get on the housing ladder even when prices were lower, a short period of redundency for them would take yeqars to recover from. Therefore whilst it would indeed be wonderfull if everyone was self sufficient in times are hardship, its unrealistic to expect. Im sorry if my use of the word nob is someway short of eloquent, but its just seemed to fit.

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Sad to say, I think this recesssion could be a kind of employment 'tree shake'. When a recovery comes, it will be among those still with work and still solvent. There could be a a lot of 'nouveau pauvres' who are left behind to contemplate the prospect of joining the underclass.

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in fact, if the country is ever going to be on an even rational keel, it is necessary that people actually start thinking ahead for the rainy days as well as the boom times.

there are millions that have almost NO protection against hard times.

the country will never be able to grow healthily if the people don't take healthy precautions themselves.

This is true, but if the precautions involve picking bits off the corpse and selling them to one another then it's self-delusion rather than a sound plan IMO.

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I dont wish to be harsh but I have little sympathy for those who get made redundant and moan

So if you got sacked, you'd dance around laughing and singing and buy everyone a drink?

Thats like saying "I dont wish to be harsh but I have little sympathy for those who get injured in an accident and get paralysed and moan, they should have taken out disability insurance"

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  • 284 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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