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The private rental market will get even more competitive -- owners will try to hang on to the property in their name for as long as they can and ride out what they hope will be a blip - simply they will try to get someone that covers at least part of their commitment.

this can be seen in the number of landlords signing up to social accomodation schemes with the council and assigning properties to tenants over a long term.

They know that the returns on renting are p*** poor unless they get a capital gain into the equation and they will hold out until the bitter end to get it.

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"And now onto the current situation. I have recently had the chance to maybe get a job in slough and had a brief look at the rental market back in Camberley area where we used to live (not quite a year ago yet) and was shocked at the increase in rents that have occured! Considering that two years ago, property seemed to be applenty and rents were kept down, now they have shot up. This personal experience seems to have been corroburated by national studies (RICS - rental)."

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/ind...p?showtopic=446

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People shouldn't just take yours & my words for it BBB, they need to get off the sofa and take a look outside. Not talking to you Gerd, just to anyone that's listening.

Do you like my new signature below?

"The experience of being a property bear can be described as two very dark, long period's of time, bridged by a slither of light."

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"And now onto the current situation. I have recently had the chance to maybe get a job in slough and had a brief look at the rental market back in Camberley area where we used to live (not quite a year ago yet) and was shocked at the increase in rents that have occured! Considering that two years ago, property seemed to be applenty and rents were kept down, now they have shot up. This personal experience seems to have been corroburated by national studies (RICS - rental)."

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/ind...p?showtopic=446

1 mans proposition - perhaps he's easily shocked.

People are too late to sell to rent. Most folk will hang on grimly

There are loads of rentals on the market up for negotiation.

IMHO

Oh and from what I've read TTRTR you seem honest. BBB I'm just not sure about you I think I smell B*****!

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Hey, stop hijacking my bearish posts for your bullish means :angry: :D

What that post indicated was that the BTL's ARE selling up and getting out of the market, which is a bearish sign. Less rental property more people priced out of ownership and into rented, ergo rents rise.

I don't think people will try and hold on to a falling asset, some will, but most won't, IMHO.

Topher Bear

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i don't know - the number of FTBs has already dropped so much - almost by half from its norm over past 18 mos. or so and yet rents have not risen. I can only speak from my experience of London but there always seem to be heaps of available properties and I've never had a landlord who wasn't willing to cut the rent from the advertised price.

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My father has rented out a property to a lovely couple for the past 8 years. He has never put the rent up and does not intend to. Why.? Well, they take great care of the property and maintain it well and he has continuous rent year after year with no gaps. Our landlord increased our rent in July by £10 a month, not a huge amount but we requested that it stayed the same and he agreed.!!

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Hey, stop hijacking my bearish posts for your bullish means  :angry:  :D

What that post indicated was that the BTL's ARE selling up and getting out of the market, which is a bearish sign.  Less rental property more people priced out of ownership and into rented, ergo rents rise.

I don't think people will try and hold on to a falling asset, some will, but most won't, IMHO.

Topher Bear

Bearish on prices, but not on rents. This is a rent thread & thanks very much for contributing!

Apologies for using your post again, but it just sounds so honest & unbiased that I am continually drawn back to it when the question is raised again.

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Are you all bonkers?

Rents will be cut.

At present an average house costing £170,000 will mean £1,028 PCM on a 95% repayment mortgage at 5.75%

To rent the house at 6% yield then the rent is £850 PCM

Post-crash, the same house can be bought for £102,000 (40% drop) then the mortgage payment will be £616 PCM on a 95% advance at the same rate, or if rates get cut, £503 PCM at 3.75%.

Your rents are going to have to come down by 20%+ to remain in the same ball-park!

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Rent must fall - there is now simply too much property.

Especially now all the new developments are not going to sell. Bell End Homes etc are going to have to become giant landlords themselves if they intend to survive the next 2 years, and they WON'T be getting stonking rents for their cruddy little 'designer' flatlets. Nice kitchen but IT'S IN THE MIDDLE OF NOWHERE!!!

Sanity returns, rents fall, the property market collapses, and the economy is revealed for what it is, a sham, propped up by loony debt and wicked speculation by people who should have known better...

Those of us with cash, on yer marks...! :-) Bring it on!!!

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Are you all bonkers?

Rents will be cut.

At present an average house costing £170,000 will mean £1,028 PCM on a 95% repayment mortgage at 5.75%

To rent the house at 6% yield then the rent is £850 PCM

Post-crash, the same house can be bought for £102,000 (40% drop) then the mortgage payment will be £616 PCM on a 95% advance at the same rate, or if rates get cut, £503 PCM at 3.75%.

Your rents are going to have to come down by 20%+ to remain in the same ball-park!

If your assumptions were correct, then rents would have risen steadily as prices rose.

What you don't seem to have factored in above is the much higher rates needed for a real crash.

Higher rates = higher costs for both landlords & OO's = pressure on rents resulting in rises.

No higher rates = no crash = no need for major shift's in rents.

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My father has rented out a property to a lovely couple for the past 8 years. He has never put the rent up and does not intend to. Why.? Well, they take great care of the property and maintain it well and he has continuous rent year after year with no gaps.  Our landlord increased our rent in July by £10 a month, not a huge amount but we requested that it stayed the same and he agreed.!!

Lou, when you asked for the rent not to be changed, did you not worry about him kicking you out? we've just had our rent raised today by £10 per month, in total that's 2 raises he's done since we've been here, giving him an extra £20 per month. Whilst I would prefer the rent to remain unchanged, I don't want to risk losing where we are. We are good tenants and maintain the property well. Unsure whether to just sign it off, or quible it?

Thoughts anyone? :(

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Err sorry, and I can't even blame booze for this one :P

% increase on the £10 raise is 1.24%!

Doesn't sound much does it? still grieves that he has the power to do it though

Is that so bad? You've said you don't want to leave, if you haven't done it already, why don't you agree to the rise in exchange for a longer tenancy contract?

Might make both you and your landlord happy to have certainty for a while.

£10 pcm is £120 pa which is not enough to move house for. You said you have kids right? Not worth the argument with the landlord if you ask me.

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  • 439 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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