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Is My Krugerrand Dodgy?


Krug
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Hi, I recently purchased 8 1 oz krugerrand gold coins. All dated 1974 1976 1980 1981

One coin is from 1974.

The 1974 coin seems slightly different to the other years, it has an ever so slightly darker colour to the others. It has less well defined ridges all around the circumference. The ridges seem to be more numerous as well.

It also has some small round stains on it which wont rub off. The stains are dark red in colour.

It is however the same weight, diameter and thickness as the other coins. It also emits a long high pitched ping when tapped. Same as the others.

Should I be worried?

Thanks

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Hi, I recently purchased 8 1 oz krugerrand gold coins. All dated 1974 1976 1980 1981

One coin is from 1974.

The 1974 coin seems slightly different to the other years, it has an ever so slightly darker colour to the others. It has less well defined ridges all around the circumference. The ridges seem to be more numerous as well.

It also has some small round stains on it which wont rub off. The stains are dark red in colour.

It is however the same weight, diameter and thickness as the other coins. It also emits a long high pitched ping when tapped. Same as the others.

Should I be worried?

Thanks

If it really is exactly the same weight, diameter, and thickness as the others (and assuming the others are genuine) then this is genuine too.

One of the things that makes gold so practical as an investment is its ease of validation, the only elements that are "heavier" are either more expensive or too toxic to handle!

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As has been said the dimensions and weight mean it is real. You may find this link helpful regarding the red spots.

http://www.taxfreegold.co.uk/redspotsongoldcoins.html

Very interesting, thanks. Explains some stains on my sovereigns too.

I found a good way to clean grimey old soverigns is to soak them in neat flash for a few minuets and then scrub with the wifes tooth brush before rinsing in hot tapwater. I know some would object to this but they would be nutters imo.

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Very interesting, thanks. Explains some stains on my sovereigns too.

I found a good way to clean grimey old soverigns is to soak them in neat flash for a few minuets and then scrub with the wifes tooth brush before rinsing in hot tapwater. I know some would object to this but they would be nutters imo.

Scrubbing with the wife's toothbrush is not recommended as great damage can be done .....

to you, when she finds out. :unsure:

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I know some would object to this but they would be nutters imo.

there is nothing worse than an EF+ coin on ebay that has had a light polish.

even an aunc coin that has a bit or tar on it should never be cleaned. there really is no point, and make buyers MORE CONCERNED about the authenticity.

if you dont like it, take it to a pawn brokers and sell it.

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there is nothing worse than an EF+ coin on ebay that has had a light polish.

even an aunc coin that has a bit or tar on it should never be cleaned. there really is no point, and make buyers MORE CONCERNED about the authenticity.

if you dont like it, take it to a pawn brokers and sell it.

Let me explain. Say I had two identical sovereigns, except one is contaminated with dirt. I clean the coin by disolving the dirt. Now both coins look the same. So whats the problem with cleaning the coin?

IMO its as stupid as suggesting that you should not clean a classic car, an old oil painting or antique furniture.

I did not say anything about polishing the coins, only cleaning.

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Hi, I recently purchased 8 1 oz krugerrand gold coins. All dated 1974 1976 1980 1981

One coin is from 1974.

The 1974 coin seems slightly different to the other years, it has an ever so slightly darker colour to the others. It has less well defined ridges all around the circumference. The ridges seem to be more numerous as well.

I have various years krugers and the edges appear different too. Some look thinner but they all weigh correctly.

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Very interesting, thanks. Explains some stains on my sovereigns too.

I found a good way to clean grimey old soverigns is to soak them in neat flash for a few minuets and then scrub with the wifes tooth brush before rinsing in hot tapwater. I know some would object to this but they would be nutters imo.

Take a common Sovereign like a 1914 London mint George, if you had a fleur de coin (FDC), a proof quality coin, it would be worth about £400. Put your fingers on it and you will add a grease stain that is immediately visible under magnification and will change the colour of the coin in a few years. As soon as you put your sticky fingers on it, its value drops to £240 because it has now dropped a grade to uncirculated (UNC).

So you think that you should clean it using something slightly acidic to remove the grease, like a bit of Flash, and give it a bit of a rub, those slight scratches have now made it extra fine (EF) or about £160. Rub a bit harder or drop it during the rubbing and bruise the edge and it becomes very fine (VF) or fine (F). It doesn't matter which because it is a quite common coin the 1914 London, there are a lot of them about and VF, F, Fair and poor quality is worth the same as bullion value (BV) or spot gold value +/- 10% depending on where you sell it. If you think that UK numismatic coin collectors are pedantic bastards with their 8 levels of quality of (BV, poor, fair, fine, very fine, extra fine, UNC, FDC), then consider the US with their 45 levels that represent the same set.

By all means clean your coin if you want to, it's yours and if you do you then there will be fewer coins in the better grades and that will make mine worth more ;)

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The poster said "grimey old sovereigns". This is not a description of a proof coin. A bullion coin does not lose value by such polishing.

By all means clean your coin if you want to, it's yours and if you do you then there will be fewer coins in the better grades and that will make mine worth more

The problem with investing in any collectibles is that prices are dependent on the number of collectors. When kids played with train sets, they grew up and had the money to buy the set they always wanted. Yet the next generation didn't play with trains and so attribute no value to these old toys. Having the finest example of a coin only has value to coin collectors. Everyone else is only interested in the coins as bullion, the value of the metal. They have no interest at all in coin collecting and see bullion possession as an alternative to keeping the money in the bank.

I pay for an ounce of gold. I wont pay double the price for a highly polished piece of gold. The extra polish has no value to me, only to you. Its why the numismatic world is so full of fakes. Anyone can surface scan a coin down to the sub micron level with a laser, cut the die using the same image, and punch a bunch of proof coins. Its going to get more like the art world where providence is everything since production of identical fakes is so easy.

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The poster said "grimey old sovereigns". This is not a description of a proof coin. A bullion coin does not lose value by such polishing.

...

The point I am making thod is that the poster may not realise that the 'grimey old sovereign' could be that rare one and worth more than its scrap bullion value without it being a proof, it could look just like a circulated bullion coin. A 1880 Melbourne Short Tail in Fine condition, is worth approximately £1,000 but the long tail version of the same year only bullion value, yet both were coins in circulation, so they are scratched and battered, if it was a VF short tail add £500, EF add twice that. Find any I will happily give you the price of a bullion coin for it.

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Say that I buy a sov on ebay and its filthy. I clean it with flash as described,which had no effect on the metal content, only the dirt. It turns out to be rare and desireable to a collector. How would a dirty coin be worth more than a clean one and how would he know that it used to be dirty? And if it was rare but dirty, ie a metal detector find, are you seriously telling me that it shouldnt have the earth removed from it? Again im talking about cleaning, not polishing which would remove metal, and is obviously a bad idea. Do coin collecters never clean a coin regardless of its contamination?

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Say that I buy a sov on ebay and its filthy. I clean it with flash as described,which had no effect on the metal content, only the dirt. It turns out to be rare and desireable to a collector. How would a dirty coin be worth more than a clean one and how would he know that it used to be dirty? And if it was rare but dirty, ie a metal detector find, are you seriously telling me that it shouldnt have the earth removed from it? Again im talking about cleaning, not polishing which would remove metal, and is obviously a bad idea. Do coin collecters never clean a coin regardless of its contamination?

Using your example they would send it away for restoration or depending on their knowledge, skill and tools do it their self. Under magnification they would lift dirt that is freely coming off using a dental pick especially around the areas that can identify the coin. All gold coins contain other metals such as copper, silver, zinc and the coin will be treated to chemically stabilise it to reduce oxidisation of the other metals. The coin will be placed into a neutral PH chmical solution and cleaned using ultrasound. There are a large array of chemicals that the restorer can use to remove 'dirt' on coins from sodium bicarbonate to nitric acid but they know through a knowledge of chemical reactions and experience which, just how long and at what strength each treatment needs to be.

If it is one of the rare ones then when it is identified it can be professionally cleaned but until then it is worth just leaving the coin as it is, the dirt does not affect the bullion price or its numismatic value.

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Using your example they would send it away for restoration or depending on their knowledge, skill and tools do it their self. Under magnification they would lift dirt that is freely coming off using a dental pick especially around the areas that can identify the coin. All gold coins contain other metals such as copper, silver, zinc and the coin will be treated to chemically stabilise it to reduce oxidisation of the other metals. The coin will be placed into a neutral PH chmical solution and cleaned using ultrasound. There are a large array of chemicals that the restorer can use to remove 'dirt' on coins from sodium bicarbonate to nitric acid but they know through a knowledge of chemical reactions and experience which, just how long and at what strength each treatment needs to be.

If it is one of the rare ones then when it is identified it can be professionally cleaned but until then it is worth just leaving the coin as it is, the dirt does not affect the bullion price or its numismatic value.

Sounds expensive. Just clean it with flash. :P

Edited by endgame
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