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Found 10 results

  1. Thought I'd share a great talk from the economist Milton Friedman on Inflation and explains a lot of what's been happening with house prices. He even talks about inflation being divisive: winners and losers, and he specifically talks about housing in this regard. The bit between 34 and 38 mins(ish) is probably the most relevant to housing but the whole talk is worth listening to. We talk a lot about a divided society and I believe inflation is one of the leading causes.
  2. Of course, no sign of inflation here. Everything is fine. Move along. Supermarket products get smaller ... but prices stay the same size Hundreds of items, including toilet rolls and biscuits, see de facto price rise as package sizes shrink, according to research by Which? In its latest round-up of shrinking groceries, Which? found that toilet rolls, chocolate biscuits and orange juice were among the popular shopping items that had had a de facto price increase. Which? researchers found that Andrex had cut the number of sheets on its standard toilet rolls from 240 to 221 sheets – an 8% fall. The price had remained roughly £2 for four rolls, the watchdog found. Those who enjoy a McVitie’s dark chocolate digestive biscuit are also set to be disappointed. Which? found the packet had decreased from 332g to 300g, a reduction of more than 10%. These had sold in Tesco for £1.59 before the packet size shrank, but had increased to £1.69 afterwards, it said. Tropicana Creations Pure Premium orange and raspberry juice decreased from 1 litre to 850ml, a 15% reduction, yet it had remained at £2.48 in Asda. http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/apr/20/supermarket-products-smaller-size-prices-stay-same
  3. Hello all I am new to this valuable and hope you can share your thoughts. My partner and I have managed to save up about £50k which should be enough to cover deposit and costs for the purchase of our first home. The question is whether to buy now or wait? We are renting at the moment in a nice but smallish 3 bed semi and would like to buy something along those lines. Prices for such properties are from around £350k - £400k which I feel is very high. Around £300k gets you a mid terrace. Our ideal property would currently have a repayment higher than our rent cost. I am prepared to wait if it makes sense to. I have read a lot on here about BTL changes, rising inflation and possible interest rate increases, Brexit etc...so much going on! So I am confused on what to do. I'd rather not rush and pay over the odds only for prices to drop. Wait or buy now? All thoughts are welcome Thanks
  4. Today's inflation figures in May from the ONS: CPI 2.9% and RPI 3.7%. Student debt now accumulating interest charges at 6.7% p.a. Ouch.
  5. Worst decade for pay in 210 years, Recovery locked in now http://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/news/uk-in-worst-decade-for-pay-growth-for-210-years-says-thinktank/ar-AAo39a1?li=AA54rU and Rents to rise 20% http://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/other/rents-to-go-up-more-than-20percent-in-five-years-surveyors-warn/ar-AAo2p1L?li=AA54rU How does that work? Does Winston need to work harder to modify the stories?
  6. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/property/11700282/Mapped-How-much-has-your-house-price-moved-in-10-years.html Inflation adjusted prices over ten years aren't as high as I'd have thought for 90% of the country...
  7. There's been an increase in wealthy households - thank God for trickle down wealth and Help to Buy !
  8. LInk: Washington Post There are many threads at the moment about 'good and bad deflation'. Well, our own lovely George Osborne has argued that the UK has good deflation, while those foreign chaps have it bad. And on the Spanish thread, economist Edward Hugh suggests that 'good deflation' is by no means impeding the 'Spanish recovery'. . . may even be helping. So what should we think about Ukraine? I have a girlfriend from Ukraine staying at the moment who is soooh looking forward to paying off her credit card bill at the end of the month . . . buy with good money and pay back with bad. No deflationary, deferred purchase syndrome here. More like shop 'til you drop. So what does the team think? Could 39,000% inflation p.a. be good, more effective than QE? Crazy I know . . .
  9. There's a review of the local plan in our area in Hampshire going on at the moment. I am looking to suggest to the plan that areas of land to be set aside for required housing have a proportion allocated for self-build for people tied to the local area, rather than being snapped up by developers to build tiny, cloned, faceless properties which they want 20-40% profit on. And subsequent speculation. Question is: How to ensure these are built and owned by people who actually LIVE in them? How about a restrictive covenant that holds the owner to not being allowed to sell for more than CPI for 5-10 years? I put together a quick sheet showing how land costs (£731,168 per Hectare in 1994 across England) extrapolates back to 1980 and up to 2013 by using ONS data, and an average of 30 dwellings per hectare. Build cost has been assumed as £10,000 in 1980. See below to see how, if prices were priced at Inflation, homes that cost £22,761 in 1980 would now cost £75,447 in 2013. The base inputs are in RED and all the other results are extrapolated. Land price input from 1994 as the earliest date in the sources. Year Inflation Land Price Build Cost Total Price per Hectare (England) Price / Dwelling @ 30/H 1980 18.00% £10,961.11 £11,800.00 £22,761.11 1981 11.90% £12,441.66 £13,204.20 £25,645.86 1982 8.60% £13,612.32 £14,339.76 £27,952.09 1983 4.60% £14,268.68 £14,999.39 £29,268.07 1984 5.00% £15,019.67 £15,749.36 £30,769.03 1985 6.10% £15,995.39 £16,710.07 £32,705.46 1986 3.40% £16,558.37 £17,278.21 £33,836.58 1987 4.20% £17,284.31 £18,003.90 £35,288.21 1988 4.90% £18,174.88 £18,886.09 £37,060.97 1989 5.20% £19,171.82 £19,868.17 £39,039.98 1990 7.00% £20,614.85 £21,258.94 £41,873.79 1991 7.50% £22,286.33 £22,853.36 £45,139.69 1992 4.30% £23,287.70 £23,836.05 £47,123.75 1993 2.50% £23,884.82 £24,431.95 £48,316.77 1994 2.00% £24,372.27 £24,920.59 £49,292.86 £731,168.00 £24,372.27 1995 2.60% £25,005.95 £25,568.53 £50,574.47 1996 2.50% £25,631.09 £26,207.74 £51,838.84 1997 1.80% £26,092.45 £26,679.48 £52,771.93 1998 1.60% £26,509.93 £27,106.35 £53,616.29 1999 1.30% £26,854.56 £27,458.73 £54,313.30 2000 0.80% £27,069.40 £27,678.40 £54,747.80 2001 1.20% £27,394.23 £28,010.55 £55,404.78 2002 1.30% £27,750.36 £28,374.68 £56,125.04 2003 1.40% £28,138.86 £28,771.93 £56,910.79 2004 1.30% £28,504.67 £29,145.96 £57,650.63 2005 2.10% £29,103.26 £29,758.03 £58,861.29 2006 2.30% £29,772.64 £30,442.46 £60,215.10 2007 2.30% £30,457.41 £31,142.64 £61,600.05 2008 3.60% £31,553.88 £32,263.77 £63,817.65 2009 2.10% £32,216.51 £32,941.31 £65,157.82 2010 3.29% £33,276.43 £34,025.08 £67,301.51 2011 4.48% £34,767.22 £35,549.41 £70,316.62 2012 2.83% £35,751.13 £36,555.45 £72,306.58 2013 2.60% £36,680.66 £37,505.90 £74,186.55 2014 1.70% £37,304.23 £38,143.50 £75,447.73 Sources Cat. Link Note Price Land https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-housing-market-and-house-prices UK / Hectare Density http://www.woking.gov.uk/planning/policy/localplan/density.pdf 30 Dwellings / hectare Inflation http://www.whatsthecost.com/historic.cpi.aspx CPI Inflation http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/datasets-and-tables/data-selector.html?cdid=D7G7&dataset=mm23&table-id=1.2
  10. Have you been trying to buy/sell a property in England and Wales and have found that vendors/buyers are difficult to commit even if an offer is accepted and ready to exchange? Have you lost most money, time and mostly patience with properties where things changed the last minute? Are you thinking of buying a property in the future and have your own family home but the news and house prices put you off on making this move? Do you think by changing the law, the process will be fairer and more transparent while stop house price inflation? If all the above sound familiar and bring bad memories of the property experience, then have a look at our petition and help us make a change. Share on Facebook and Twitter with friends and family. https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/make-house-buying-fairer
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