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R K

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Posts posted by R K

  1. Thanks VMR/RK,

    you have both given me something to think about...I can now go off and do some more research...just one final question:-

    On the 'big day' (retirement) you have a number of choices (due to recent changes) that basically involve taking a lumpsum, and/or buying an annuity and/or draw-down. Now my understanding is with an annuity to pay £x's and get a fixed amount in return whilst you are alive BUT have no access to the capital that you paid (correct?)...and a draw-down is simply leaving the capital with the pension company (invested in a share portfolio) and taking a % return on the yearly profits YET you still maintain the capital sum (and so can take bits of that tax-free over a period of time) correct?

    Thanks for you help so far.

    VMR has ably summarised your options but there is one other benefit under the new "flexible" pension rules & that is that you can bequeath your SIPP if you die to, say, your children. If you have children that may be something to consider. Depending on whether you die before/after 75 affects the taxation treatment to some extent. Also it sits outside (i.e. in addition to) your estate which may also be a consideration. hargreaves Landsdown site covers all of this pretty well imo (observation not recommendation)

  2. You've got my number, and no mistake.

    Ghost Bird, on 06 Jul 2016 - 12:23 AM, said:snapback.png

    Spoken like a true investor. You never did mention your property portfolio's LTV. Where is it at now?

    Im still waiting for you to apologise for your unfounded, unwarranted & nasty personal attack against me.

    I dont know who you are but if I dont receive your apology I shall ensure I will find out via the website owners or by other means if necessary. Are we clear?

  3. Breaking news. Already aggrieved by 'gay cure' slander, Crabb reacts to news of an endorsement from R K the only way he reasonably can.

    You can stop trolling me now ok.

    A reminder of the forum you are posting in:-

    House prices and the economy
    This is the main discussion forum where you can have your say about house prices and the economy
    It is not called "ghost birds personal trolling forum"
    If you dont have an on topic non-trolling post you wish to make as per forum rules then I suggest you refrain.
  4. Spoken like a true investor. You never did mention your property portfolio's LTV. Where is it at now?

    It's my honest assessment of where we are at

    You may have a different one I couldn't care less

    I ignore adhoms and trolls so try your little mind games with someone else. I don't play

    If you don't like my posts put me on ignore.

    FYI I don't have & never have had a property portfolio so you're barking up the wrong tree there sunshine

    However your post(s) do speak to the irrational paranoia rife on this site. If you don't want a house are not interested in house prices or the economy rather just wish to personally attack other posters one wonders what you are doing here in the first place.

  5. Carney's pronouncements in reaction to the vote is probably as much to blame for the fall in the £ as the vote itself. Just like 2008 in fact when the Bank slashed rates and printed.

    Added to that his misery and 'risks'. Well perhaps keep it to yourself mate. Why scare the horses just to prove you're 'right'.

    Perhaps with rates close to ZLB he was rather hoping he could talk ££ down. First mover advantage & all that, same as Merv in 2008/9.

    It has worked rather well so far. ££ down to 1.30 and hes not had to cut rates even 1 bp. genius.

  6. Yes, I do wish just one journalist asked him what circumstances would trigger an actual real rate rise.

    Absolutely.

    My guess is they (BoE) will fixate on the pass through to wages rather than headline CPI. Ive said for several years they will likely want to run the economy "hot" for as long as they can get away with. Downside risk is stagflation for a time. All Brexit does is delay that for a time

  7. Central banks, the world over, have immense influence... but, I suspect, they are not entirely unaccountable.

    I think the GBP-USD exchange rate is one of the clearest indicators of the nature of central bank policy. It looks, to me, that our exchange rate is being left to market forces... and only CPI is being targeted.

    I suspect that the word 'uncertainty' is being used in a very specific way. Mervyn King, in his (first) book, talks about the distinction between 'uncertainty' and 'risk'... essentially, I understand, 'uncertainty' to relate to those unknowns that one can't reliably predict, measure or actively manage.

    CPI will likely be up +3-5% into 2017 (££, oil base effects etc)

    They will ignore it as they did in 2011

    I think hotairmail referred to this in the past as "volaflation"

  8. Should this be read as admitting that the cycle has turned?

    For how much longer?

    Personal view? It will likely be a short-lived response.

    On some measures Brexit shock was on scale of Lehman shock. Seems way overdone to me. That also turned out to be a rather excellent long term asset buying opp & a (low) turning point. Some asset markets (equities notably) had a subsequent panic low 6 months later for instance in Feb/Mar 09 but outcome was the same.

    Carney (to his credit imo) has got on top of this quickly & decisively unlike the shower in Westminster

  9. Helia Ebrahimi @heliaebrahimi 4m4 minutes ago

    Breaking: BoE decides to scrap new capital requirements until next year in aftermath of referendum shock #brexit

    Helia Ebrahimi @heliaebrahimi 4m4 minutes ago

    Breaking: BoE gives £5.7bn capital boost to banks in hopes of seeing banks boost lending to the tune of £150bn #brexit

    Bank of England @bankofengland 3m3 minutes ago

    #FinancialStabilityReport – July 2016 http://ow.ly/bEmk301TSs5

    Helia Ebrahimi @heliaebrahimi 6m6 minutes ago

    Today's £5.7bn capital boost for banks shd have a more immediate impact than the FLS scheme - but demand in the real economy has to be there

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