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Principia

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Everything posted by Principia

  1. https://www.parliament.uk/about/how/role/relations-with-other-institutions/parliament-government/
  2. @HDMHI - Yep, I am sure you are right, and that in reality there are a host of reasons for problems recruiting teachers. I just thought it was interesting that, in this example, the first reason quoted for the problem was not "poor class discipline" or "workload" or "government interference", but house prices. Yeah - maybe teachers salaries aren't exactly stratospheric - but, as has been said many times before on this website, the problem of unaffordability of house prices is not because salaries (in general) are too low, but that house prices are too high. I think this is the first time I've seen it stated so plainly in a report like this.
  3. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-35895321 Watch at least the first 50 seconds. The article gives a specific example of a school in Oxford. Head teacher is asked why she she got zero responses to adverts for five teachers. First answer - "House prices are too high". I wonder how many other recruitment problems (not necessarily teachers), have exactly the same reason? It seems to me that there are many other societal problems that exist, for which the main reason is probably "house prices are too high".
  4. You didn't sound cross. Just being realistic and telling it as it is. Liked the comment on the "silent majority" (or something like that) wanting the prices to fall. I thought you came across very well.
  5. Nice one Black Tuesday. (I assume you were the caller from Malvern).
  6. Probably not. Have a look at the BBC News version of the story: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7757830.stm As far as Barroso is concerned, a referendum would matter little: "I know that the majority in Britain are still opposed, but there is a period of consideration under way and the people who matter in Britain are currently thinking about it", he said. The "people who matter" obviously do not include the "majority".
  7. As far as Barroso is concerned, a referendum would matter little: "I know that the majority in Britain are still opposed, but there is a period of consideration under way and the people who matter in Britain are currently thinking about it", he said. The "people that matter" obviously do not include the "majority". (Barroso quote taken from the BBC News version of the story: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7757830.stm ) Edited to mention BBC.
  8. As explained by the various other posters, the line is exponential etc. The perception that it is heading towards the vertical is purely down to the scaling of the graph. If, say, in years to come, the trend line reaches £1,000,000, then you would need to re-scale the y-axis of the graph to fit this number on. In doing so, the line will be "flattened" out on the page. Even at such a high figure, the shape of the trend line would look remarkably similar to what it looks like now. You can demonstrate this yourself, if you take the data for the first half of the graph - e.g. take data before 1990, and ignore everything after that. When you re-scale the y-axis, the resulting trend will look pretty much the same as the current trend, rather than looking "flatter". The only way it would "look" vertical is if the rate of change suddenly increased over the period you were monitoring. E.g. if house prices suddenly increased at 100%pa. Even then, the shape of the trend line depends on the "type" of trend used (e.g. linear, power, moving average etc.)
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