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Fingers

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About Fingers

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    HPC Poster
  1. Fingers

    Forum Upgrade Issues

    I can't find the LoFi version any more - where is it?
  2. +1 - it sounds like they've assessed her for income based JSA rather than contributions based. Has she been making NI contributions?
  3. The heat generated during baking will warm the house up, so should net out against the central heating costs if you have a thermostat controlled system Fingers
  4. Fingers

    Ftb'ers At 7.9%

    How long can BTL replace FTB? Depends how the media decide to present the pensions crisis to us. A lot of people have lost trust in the govt and traditional pensions funds, and a cashflow negative BTL is just like a normal pension really - the yield goes positive somewhere towards retirement. I'm a bear by nature, but imagine if all the Locationx3 type TV shows started to slant their message to get people to think about pensions, and combine that with a few more pensions tax U-turns and govt scandals. Who knows.
  5. Fingers

    Reading

    I'm looking at 3 bed semi's in the woodley/earley/twyford area and find that quality is selling fairly quickly - sometime within days. The EA's don't return calls and certainly aren't chasing me to view places, so they're clearly not short of cash-in-hand buyers. Maybe it's just the spring madness... I'm staggered by the price of flats (or 'luxury appartments') around here - there are two bed flats on at 275k, which would buy you a 3 bed semi with a huge garden. Talk about vulnerable in a downturn... Fingers
  6. Fingers

    Euros As A Good Hedge Against Inflation

    I assume IEUT pays no dividends, so you need the pound to devalue at ~4% (subject to your tax position) per year just to break even? I suppose this is an argument for some well chosen Euro blue chips, but then surely the income of companies like BASF is so global, you may aswell buy ICI? Fingers
  7. Today the fickle media have decide that pensions are important... so I'll jump on their 24 hour bandwagon and ask: A) If we are all to be compelled to pay a proportion of our salary - say 5% - to a pension, then won't we see 1) reduced disposable income =economic problems, less money to buy houses, prices fall 2) increased money pouring into stocks and investment property (would these cancel out?) If we all save the same amount, then what's the point - when we retire there's still the wrong demographic to support the supposed 2:1 worker:pensioner ration. So you just get inflation as all the pensioner money is chasing the few remaining workers? If we get migrants in to work, then the ratio changes, they pay tax, and there's no problem. Why doesn't the govt just give everyone a £100,000 bond right now, adjusted according to your income, that you're not allowed to spend until retirement? Fingers
  8. Fingers

    Gold Vs Silver

    How does this compare to spread betting the value of Silver increasing, so that you can leave your capital earning 4.5% interest? Are the buy/sell spreads smaller? Fingers
  9. If the companies we're talking about are owned by british shareholders, then protecting profits by keeping workforce levels in line with demand should just mean that we have a more efficient private sector, and as you say, some more people out of work ready to go to new demand elsewhere. The thing that's difficult to quantify is whether a negative sentiment ripple would be caused sooner than would have been otherwise, and if some people lose their job earlier, then do their friends and family tighten spending sooner than otherwise, etc etc
  10. When the July 7th bombs went off, traders were told to switch off their automatic trading systems to prevent a downward spiral of stop loss selling. A good idea. Since the last recession, companies have moved their structures more towards outsourcing and flexible work contracts. We're also a far more goal/incentive driven as a society, and this can be seen inside companies in the form of middle and upper management bonuses based on revenue, profit, shareprice, etc. We've already seen announcements of layoffs from some big names, based on them (or their competitors) experiencing slightly weaker sales, and forecasting generally lower sales. Protecting profits and bonuses by reacting to events that haven't happened yet. Can this corporate agility, and lack of 'inertia' in the employment force, mean that a recession can go into a much tighter negative feedback loop than 15 years ago? Fingers
  11. Fingers

    Into Thin Air

    If a bank borrows £10 from the BofE and then loans out £100 to the general public, why aren't the interest rates they charge (BaseRate/10)+RiskPremium? Fingers
  12. Fingers

    Picking Shares

    What do you think of McDonalds, Growl? It's got a poor reputation and has been the butt of all the junk food bad press and a figurehead in it's market for attack, litigation, regulation etc. Nevertheless, it's a global brand up there with Cocacola, and it's share price is close to it's level in 1996. It seems to be that with good leadership it'll succeed in reinventing itself into a health food deli chain, and I don't think this is reflected in the current price. Undervalued? Fingers
  13. There's stiff competition in that market...
  14. Fingers

    1oz Gold Bars!

    Premium over gold is imporant, but so is resale potential. Coins like Britanias (and Krugers to a lesser extent) are more pleasing to own, and will sell more readily than anonymous bullion bars. Take a look at eBay completed auctions - you can easily sell at 1oz coin for ~£265 today - as the market is wider - collectors, investors, etc. There's a useful guide from Chards at: http://www.taxfreegold.co.uk/investmentadvice.html Fingers
  15. Fingers

    Stock Portfolio Trackers

    That's not quite white I mean. I want to see the total value of the entire portfolio, over time. So if I've invested 6k in 6 different companies, some have gone up in value, some gone down, I want to see a single line chart for the past year, so it'd probably tell me the portfolio was worth £5800 12 months ago, and £6800 today. Fingers
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