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PropertyBear

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  1. Looks like the 3-bed bungalow with avacado bathroom suite in Dulwich has gone. It was on at £935k. http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-43323032.html How long before Land Registry figures come through?
  2. Vince Cable is my MP. I shall write to him again and tell him to stop talking about this and actually do something about it. Suggest hell-to-buy allowance is cut in half to £300k and stamp duty tax reformed to be more progressive (it's a small change with minimal risk of unintended consequences unlike a fairer land value tax which would be hard to implement). I'm sure he'll tell me the Lib Dems are planning 270,000 new homes in London by 2018, but it's not much help today after 15 years of waiting to get on the property ladder and we're running out of time to start a family.
  3. Long time member and lurker here too. I've finally given up ever seeing an end to the insanely high prices being asked for houses, especially inside the M25. My wife finally convinced me we need to buy before the H2B kicks in - and what do you know, they bring the scheme forward. Where we are looking in SW London (Twickenham, Hampton, Esher, Walton and surrounding) that supply has been poor but that it seems to be improving but at crazy money ~ +10-15% over 3 months. Estate agents say they've had a surge of interest as a result of H2B. Whether this is entirely truthful and if so, whether it is pushing up prices is not yet clear but "Help to buy" seems to be anything but help. I'm not sure if I need my sanity checking out before buying...
  4. I'm amazed at the wealth of intelligent, thoughtful and proactive people on this site, yet it seems to be a wasted force slaying down naive flamebaiters and discussing future economic misery. Wouldn't it be better to use this efforts as a positive force for change? Reminded of one issue by the Beeb's "Credit Crash Britain", I suggest using the power of this forum to start a well thought out campaign to protect tenancy rights. Credit Crash Britain on iPlayer : http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00fh..._of_the_Affair/ I check the Number 10's e-petitions and it seems there are a few petitions that could meet the right criteria Change the rules on short term tenancies : http://petitions.number10.gov.uk/For-Tenants/ Legislate to protect tenants in repossessed properties : http://petitions.number10.gov.uk/natbtldefaultsh/ Protect tenants from repossession at short notice when their landlord defaults on their mortgage : http://petitions.number10.gov.uk/protecthomes/ However, I'm not sure the wording of the petitions is ideal. What do people think about this and campaigning on this and other issues? Ian
  5. I'm amazed at the wealth of intelligent, thoughtful and proactive people on this site, yet it seems to be a wasted force slaying down naive flamebaiters and discussing future economic misery. Wouldn't it be better to use this efforts as a positive force for change? Reminded of one issue by the Beeb's "Credit Crash Britain", I suggest using the power of this forum to start a well thought out campaign to protect tenancy rights. Credit Crash Britain on iPlayer : http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00fh..._of_the_Affair/ I check the Number 10's e-petitions and it seems there are a few petitions that could meet the right criteria Change the rules on short term tenancies : http://petitions.number10.gov.uk/For-Tenants/ Legislate to protect tenants in repossessed properties : http://petitions.number10.gov.uk/natbtldefaultsh/ Protect tenants from repossession at short notice when their landlord defaults on their mortgage : http://petitions.number10.gov.uk/protecthomes/ However, I'm not sure the wording of the petitions is ideal. What do people think about this and campaigning on this and other issues? Ian
  6. Well, it's not really not that bad right now. There's been carnage in the financial markets but so far the impact has been fairly contained to the banks and financial institutions. Until we have substantial unemployment, insolvencies, repossessions, etc it's not really that bad. What I'm saying is that, yeah, it's going to get bad. But you're calling it early, probably because you hang around here too much. Ian.
  7. A friend who worked at Cadbury's said that their sales were always pretty flat, except in a recession when they went up a bit. The theory being that people buy chocs to cheer themselves up. Still, they might not want to cheer themselves up with an entire tin of Heroes!
  8. I agree. I wonder if more flats v houses are BTL too. There could be a deluge of flats going cheap in places like London. Houses should weather the storm relatively better.
  9. It's an interesting point. I did wonder this myself but it's a lot easier to convert a house into two flats than to buy two flats and convert them back into a house. Does anyone think houses will hold their value better than flats (particularly pokey matchbox studios) or that house prices have risen just as much as studios and will eventually fall proportionally the same? Maybe if the doommongers economic catastrophe really plays out, the government will own most of the conversion flats in any given street and will be able to convert them back for "hard working families". Hehe.
  10. Wonder whether pensions will be the next government bail out (perhaps in 20 years or so)? Maybe I'll register pensionfundcrisis.co.uk for my own retirement. }
  11. Well I've heard this doomsaying before around 1999 when all the computers were about to bring the world to a halt. Now it's oil and house prices. I don't really care so long as I can check up on the societal breakdown on my spanky new iPhone. And if push comes to shove, I can always eat/chew it. http://www.engadget.com/2005/01/12/the-ipo...chew-in-the-uk/
  12. Great post! I also used to work near Bradley Stoke and it was a god awful place (arguably still is). I think at one time it was the biggest housing estate in Northern Europe? Prof Douglas Wood, Manchester Business School says, "I think if inflation stays low, the best we'll see prices stay the same in pound note terms, and I wouldn't be surprised to see them gently fall over the next twenty years. I think at the end of this period we'll see house prices 20-30% lower in real terms than they are now." (Running time 37:10) Just one of the "respectable analysts" that got it wrong then. It's perhaps hard to forecast the changes in government policy (like buy to let), innovation in creative financial instruments and general societal sentiment towards home ownership but it seems like a foolhardy comment in retrospect!
  13. Ah, right! Thanks for clarifying that. I presume then, paraffin is zero rated for VAT too?
  14. As far as I can tell, (maybe someone can correct me) aviation fuel is taxed - just at a lower rater than petrol Effective duty rate per litre (£) Unleaded petrol that is not ULSP or SFP 0.5365 Other light oil (including leaded petrol) 0.6007 Aviation gasoline (AVGAS) 0.3003 Heavy oil which is not ULSD or SFD (diesel) 0.5694 http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/budget2007/bn53.htm Tax on aviation fuel will incentivise the airlines to use less of it (though they will complain like hell about it). The consequences of this will be that: - * they will run fewer flights and stick to heavily used routes to ensure they go with as close to 100% capacity as possible (seeing this in the US already) * they may fly slower - resulting in somewhat longer journey times * they will buy the most fuel efficient planes when it comes to replenishing their stock (which will take longer if they are using their existing ones less) The real problem is the rate at which this changes - too quickly and they will won't be able to adapt quickly enough. The less profitable airlines will go out of business (they are all running on pretty tight margins as it is). Personally, I'm looking forward to the trans-atlantic sub-ocenanic maglev system.... - Ian.
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