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Planner

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Everything posted by Planner

  1. Aparently the land was used to service the retail units to the rear and had a consent for use for storage/deliverys and bins etc. Now if I was one of the neighbours, I think the lesser of two evils is a dwelling which fits in with the surrounding streetscape (which apparently it does according to the council officer and committe that aproved it). Interestingly only four letters of objection where recieved by the Council - wonder why the other 6 in the picture suddenly decided to crawl out of the woodwork for the photo shoot?! NIMBY's one and all.
  2. I suspect the flimsy lock situation is likley to invalidate your insurance (or any you purchase) more than the scaffold.
  3. Not really. You have attempted to form a tenious link between a contract and the status of a planning consent (or lack of) which in your mind seems perfectly logical. I have equally attempted to create a tenious link between a contract and the status of a planning consent (or lack of) which in my mind seems perfectly logical. To take your argument one step further - the property isnt what you are paying for in this case, you are paying for the right to live in that property, a right which isnt reduced or removed by its planning status. An enforcement notice doesnt make a property 'illegal'. We dont know what the LL response to that notice has been from the information posted, therefore we are not in a position to comment on the planning status of the property, which is lucky as it isnt relevant to the question that the o/p has asked i.e. can I break my contract and reduce rent payments?
  4. If I bought a television from a TV shop on HP and it later turned out that the shop in question never got the correct plannig through and its in fact still classed as a take away - would this make my HP contract invalid? - of course not. in a similar way Planning legislation has nothing to do with tenancy law. In terms of house insurance - theres two types - buildings and contents. If the tenant has there own contents insurance policy and the property security meets the specification required by that policy - wether or not the property has planning permission is of no relevance to the insurance company. In terms of buildings insurance, I wouldnt like to comment, but it is of no relevance to the tenant. In terms of whether or not the proerty is 'illegal', I dont think there is enough information provided here for us to make that determination - and I dont think thats the question being asked.
  5. Your not the only one, I agree. Wether or not a property has planning permission has nothing to do with a tenants contract and his liability to pay rent. As far as I can see theres no 'ace in the deck' for negotiating a rent reduction and no claim for compensation as there is no loss.
  6. Not particularly relevant as the project isnt going a head but a coffee shop (as opposed to a cafe), is classed by many authorities as an A1 (Shop), so planning permission for change of use may not have been required.
  7. Not sure of this has been posted? Some of you may recall that earlier this year the SOS for Communities and Local Government sent a letter to all Chief Planning Officers revoking all Regional Spatial Strategies (RSS). The RSS contained the previous Governments housing targets for each of the regions and individual local authorities. Off course, a number of the more NIMBY local authorities jumped on the band wagon and used this letter as an excuse to refusing housing planning applicationa. One such refusal resulted in Cala Homes High Court Challenge, which they have now won. Interesting times for house builders, despite this decision the NIMBYs appear in the ascendancy. http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010/nov/10/eric-pickles-housing-court And High Court Text attahced. Court.doc Court.doc
  8. Ohhhhh it looks lovley. I have a viewing lined up for tommorrow. Thanks for the link.
  9. The council leaders told the Work and Pensions Select Committee that could make it very difficult for low-income families to afford to live in London, reports the Observer. They warned that 82,000 families could lose their homes in London as a result of the housing benefit changes and revealed councils have already begun block booking accommodation in Reading, Hastings and Luton to help those forced out of the capital. Metro News 24th October 2010 'The demand for rental property will heat up even further in the medium-term and gazumping will become even more common as tenants look for any way in which they can get ahead of the competition,’ said Jonathan Moore, of easyroommate.co.uk.' Metro News Today? Hmm am I missing something?!
  10. The idea is to find a place you like, including fixtures and furnishings and then move in. Finding a place with unacceptable carpets and hideous furniture, moving in and then expecting it to be changed doesnt really work.
  11. Actually if its served before 4.30 on a business day its deemed served that day. If its served after 4.30 on a business day, it deemed served the next business day (so one to watch on fridays and/or bank holidays!)
  12. When faced with a potential LL repair/access, issue I always ask myself 'If given my work/family/health situation and I owned this house, could I expect to get the work done promptly/at all, with the conditions/access arangements I was proposing to impose?' . Everyones answer is likley to be different. You will know what to do based on your personal answer. Good Luck.
  13. I actually started to point out all the rubbish in this before realising it was a windup. Good bait, some actually fell for it!
  14. I wonder which runs deeper in a boomer? their Nimbyism or their greed? Would be intersting to see what would happen if that £120,000 plot was suddenly worth £2.5 million with residential planning permission. I have a feeling there just might well be a price on those 'quaint' rural views. Anyone fancing banging a planning application in?!
  15. Out of interest the sales density of food retails (sales density is sales per sq.ft of floor space) are as follows (for 2008/09): - Morrisons £1,325 - Tesco £1,256 - Asda £1,134 (2007/08) - Sainsbury's £1,150 - Waitrose £1,010 - Marks & Spencer £952 - Spar £564 These numbers always surprise me i.e. the big boys have the highest turnover while the 'posh' highvalue food retailers (Waitrose/M&S) are much lower.
  16. As sleepwello'nights has alluded to, pests and vermin in rented property are the tenants responsibility.
  17. You believe wrong! its most unusual. But helpful for you nonetheless. You obviously have some good cards in your hand as it is unlikley thay anyone else will want to take over the place if you threaten notice.
  18. While I have no particular views on the scaffolding, but I suggest you double check your contract. I have never heard of a contract that allows you to serve 30 days notice while you are still within the 6 months fixed term - what would be the point of the 6 months contract for an LL?
  19. This seems to imply that shop owners intentionally leave shops vacant for some kind of benefit? That simply isn’t the case. Shops are vacant because there is no demand for them. In terms of forcing vacant shop owners to ‘cough-up’ large amounts of cash for vacant property, many are already charged business rates on empty property. So I will reiterate, there is no benefit that I can see for commercial property owners simply leave property empty, as there is a cost involved already. In terms of renting them to Councils on short leases – as it’s already a free market and as you state, there are tons of vacant properties out there, why are they not already renting them to Councils? – answer must be no demand from Councils. Lots of people standing in the dole queue with skills such as photography, tattooing and arts and craft – why not give them 6 months to a year in rent free shops? - presumably this would then result in their replacement in the dole queue with all the existing photographers, tattooists and arts and craft shop staff in the neighbourhood from all the business who simply cannot compete with the newly arrived heavily council subsidised competition. I think your post and the subsequent agreement shows a profound naivety on how our system works. I see the exact same consequences to your suggestion here (if not worse), to those you pointed out to another posters suggestion in post 96.
  20. The headline changes are: 1) Gardens no longer classed as 'brownfield land'; 2) Minimum density of 30 dwellings per hectare removed; and 3) Persumption that all 'brownfield land' is suitable for housing, removed.
  21. "Never assume malice when stupidity will suffice." In terms of your blanket ban on viewings, while a sympathise with your view, will you be needing a reference for your next place? Dont take offence by the fact you have been served notice, this is a inherent 'danger' or process with renting which you may, unfortunatley, face again in a future rental.
  22. Lots of rubbish being posted on here, particularly the squating part! Op you have a valid contract, you are not a squatter. Wether or not your contract Is now a periodic wil depend on what and how you staying beyond the breakclause date was agreed. Was it agreed that three of you would remain and one would leave? If so its a periodic between three of you. If it was agreed, as per the breakclause that the notice could be withdrawn, then it was withdrawn and your all still in the fixed term. Can you explain in more detail what was agreed and how it was agreed.
  23. Pedro your still not right. The OP is still within the fixed term of their contract until the 9th of October. They must serve two months as per the breakclause, until the tenancy becomed periodic.
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