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Pmax2020

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  1. This is the most bonkers post I’ve seen on this forum. I’ve just said a referendum on the constitution will reveal the will of the country though it’s worth mentioning that pre-pandemic some polls were showing YES as high as 58%. Furthermore the notion that the SNP got their highest turnout due to Indy being put to bed in 2016 is utterly delusional. Independence was at the heart of the SNP and Greens manifestos and it dominated every single televised debate. It was the main topic during 6 weeks of campaigning. Without a doubt at least 90% of SNP voters are overtly pro-Indy.
  2. How on earth do achieve that? Some nurses may choose to go to the rave themselves! Some will share busy family homes with partners that work in cramped factories and with kids that go to school. Some will invariably rely on the grandparents for childcare. Trust me, the last thing I want is to live in a society where governments have to tell us to stay at home but I guess I’ve given them the benefit of the doubt until a vaccine was rolled out. If the vaccine is ineffective against new variants then we have two options... A) Heavily restrict international travel for a generation
  3. No - the inherent thing you’re missing is no one is suggesting lockdowns are sustainable or that the harsh ones we’ve endured will come back. They simply won’t. We didn’t have the vaccination nor infrastructure to break channels of transmission last March. Be that simple barriers in shops, contactless payment/booking systems or IT provisions to support people working from home. (Some of my colleagues still don’t have laptops because demand is so high from suppliers). There’s also been a huge shift in attitude that wouldn’t of happened without the last 12 months. People are broadly m
  4. No - the inherent thing you’re missing is no one is suggesting lockdowns are sustainable or that the harsh ones we’ve endured will come back. They simply won’t. We didn’t have the vaccination nor infrastructure to break channels of transmission last March. Be that simple barriers in shops, contactless payment/booking systems or IT provisions to support people working from home. (Some of my colleagues still don’t have laptops because demand is so high from suppliers). There’s also been a huge shift in attitude that wouldn’t of happened without the last 12 months. People are broadly m
  5. That narrative is so tiresome. We live in a very complex, integrated society where the the behaviour of small minorities or even individuals could threaten the well-being of others during a pandemic. I don’t see how any intelligent person can argue that broad ‘controls’ are not required. Why should a nurse working in a covid ward get on a bus with someone who went to a sweaty rave the night before? You can’t trust people to be considerate.
  6. This winter will be the acid test as most of us will be vaccinated. I broadly agree with the framework of our UK lockdowns but felt pubs re-opening and the “eat out to support businesses” was utterly stupid. Shutting non-essential’ retail was unnecessary too. I have two young children so my wife and I spend our lives catching colds and throat infections continually throughout the year. They catch bugs at school, from friends, cousins, it’s a constant battle. Guess what happened last March? No bugs... no colds... nothing... nothing all year until restrictions eased in late au
  7. Water, timber, renewable energy, food & drink, oh and trillions of pounds in oil. Yup - no idea why Westminster is desperate to save the union!
  8. Multiplying the 52% pro-Indy vote last week by the 70% turnout is a flawed way of presenting matters. For starters you’re making an irrational assumption that the remaining 67% of the electorate that voted for traditionally unionist parties or indeed didn’t vote at all are all against independence. Only a referendum would reveal what the real appetite is and that’s the democratic way of asking people.
  9. I think the fundamental argument for independence is Scotland and England are just too different to share a union. Throughout my whole adult life I’ve been ruled by Westminster governments that don’t share the same ideals of our own parliament. No greater is the disparity evident than with Brexit. A Tory government elected with a paltry 36.9% vote share claim to have a mandate for an EU referendum that sees Scotland vote distinctly to remain, but England leave. We exit on whim with no plan and amidst a pandemic. Meanwhile our Holyrood elections see a majority (52.1%) vote share for
  10. I got it wrong. I can recall sharing links with friends and giving it the old “it’s happening!!!” patter. Its clear prices have remained healthy due to a shift in the way many work. In 18 months I’ll of saved about 10k on my commute, places being shut (family days out) and a couple of foreign holidays. Many of my friends have capitalised massively on childcare savings as they WFH with the kids kicking about. I’m tired of messaging friends links to properties with the old “this will never sell at that price”. Guess what... they sell... they all do!!!!
  11. I’d love independence but unfortunately many of our fellow Scots are too stupid and brainwashed to vote for it. I see Gove was straight up to Scotland this weekend after the SNPs landslide election win. In a parliament where it’s almost mathematically impossible to gain a majority, the mainstream media frame it as failure when the SNP defy all odds by getting tantalising close to one. They gained 3 more constituency seats meaning of the ‘first past the post’ proportion they won 62/73 seats. In the regional vote for the remaining 56 seats, 1,000,000 SNP votes returned just TWO seats w
  12. In Scotland you can find them within 6-8 weeks on Registers of Scotland website. Depends how fast they complete though I guess.
  13. I believe prices in London have taken a hit but I welcome anyone to give some solid examples of properties nearer the National mean price that have struggled. Sadly property is booming right now. Hosues are going up quicker than I can save!
  14. My experience of central Scotland is that anything decent goes to a closing date within a week. What’s more concerning is that places that would normally sit for a while and sell for a more modest price are also flying off the shelves. Properties with smaller gardens, major projects, or those in less than ideal spots in terms of busy road etc. Dunfermline threw up the perfect example recently - a row of terraced Victorian houses that tend to sell for 280-290k providing they are fully modernised and have the third floor attic conversion. A couple of months ago one appears on at ‘of
  15. I’m taking a step back from property for at least a year because every house I like has closing date set before I even get through the door. It’s the number of viewings the gleeful agents can’t stop boasting about that gets me. One place went “under offer” because the agent said they had a ‘crazy’ offer. It was a project but the buyers got cold feet according to the agent who rang me back to boast that I was one of 60 people that had a viewing either cancelled or put on ice whilst the initial offer was on the table. A friend of mine just listed his house at ‘offer’s in the region’
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