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Mr. Wapkaplett

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Everything posted by Mr. Wapkaplett

  1. Thanks, I think this is likely to be a policy that runs, even with a left wing government as it makes sense to fee up more land, wherever it is, but as pointed out it may have to go to appeal and then higher, which is a ballache. I may have a chat with my Parish Council and see what their views are. I do prefer a well written EU law which has very defined articles, but the UK seems to like it grey for the lawyers to get a good payday. Still, these policies are worth exploring.
  2. The caravan act of the late sixties is worth a look at, with some amendments it's pretty much the same. Ok for the times. Now, the parks are slowly being purchased by well financed companies and the high ground rent, rules and the replacement of old caravans are all very much a reality for all year round parks. The concept of a mobile home is sound, from about 2005 the main manufacturers started to improve design with insulation, c/h, d/g etc. The trouble is, the concept of renting a pitch, putting a 5k ten year old van on and then living well is just not possible legally or practically. So
  3. Hi All I have not posted for years but follow the forum from time to time. Naturally I agree with the sentiment that the housing market is way overvalued especially in the south. It will of course correct, like always but rarely have we seem the state intervene so much in a market since the New Deal in the US. Now Osbourne is a slippery fellow but it seems he has made or will make changes to the rural exception policy on housing. It will go from allowing "social" housing outside of a development framework to extend to "affordable" housing, which has to be sold at a 20% reduction to market va
  4. If I owned a property outright and let it, would I be able to look at the following scenario? Take advantage of an equity release scheme, giving me say 50% (75k) of the value of the property. I then invest that in ING getting £3750 gross. The rent is say £600pcm so that is an annual total of £10,950 gross. I am 40, not 65, which might be a problem. All sounds nice at the top of a market, but what are the pitfalls and problems. Is it actually possible? PS: Unfortunately it is hypothetical at the moment. WapKap
  5. I am seeing quite a few SSTC boads going up and friends recently had an asking price offer on a two bed semi. There are some properties which are obviously overpriced and not shifting, but it seems ones at sensible prices are getting interest. Sensible being a subjective word. The bottom end of the market seems to bit a bit quieter, flats & small houses seem quite highly priced to me and perhaps need to be dropped to sell. I agree that property is overpriced in general, but south of Cambridge in real terms prices have been fairly stagnant for 18 months. I would suggest that places like
  6. About 15 years ago, Scandinavia began an interesting social shift, which is still noticeable today. What happened is that good value childcare became widely available, allowing both partners the ability to work. Women in western societies generally begun to consider careers etc. My personal experience of this is from colleagues of 10 years ago, who were very pleased at the progressive nature of their country, but amazed that the cost of living slowly rose so that two incomes were the norm'. I am sure this is what has happened in the UK, generally two incomes are required for setting up home
  7. Hi all As you all know the international property market is pretty dead and possibly heading south, so why do you still come to this site? I would suggest that it is for a laugh, good argument and mainly because you want house prices to drop so you can have a chance at the easy buck. Making money, real, serious money out of property since 95 has been a ridiculously easy thing to do, so much so that so many never cottoned on until 2001. Anyway, now it's gone, it may go up or go down but investment will be unattractive for a few years so why don't you chaps look elsewhere, lots of 12-15% opp
  8. The thing is, what are we intending on doing about it?
  9. I would suugest writing to Prescott about this in the first instance as he is old labour stock, and he may well be cretin but does have real power. The redistribution of land does seem essential if we want a society that is not beholden to 1000 years of oppression by the upper class. Obviously the government pay them for their land, and sell it to the masses. How does one go about this without invasion/revolution? No idea, but popular opinion would be swayed if people realised how much they could gain, however the middle classes have small vested interests now (house) so if the price of lan
  10. I have just read Kevin Cahill's Who owns Britain, a book I found recommended on this site. If you have not read it, read it. Essentially the book is a history of the titled classes control over land, law making and their ultimate wealth & power. It compared the UK to Ireland, where a redistribution of land followed the potato famine in 1845. In Ireland now, there are no real "landowners" of the scale in the UK. The average farm has about 64 acres and is family owned. As a result of the majority of the population owning the land and political vested interests being less, they pay ZERO co
  11. Baic 70's flats in Royston, Herts - 2 beds 1989 - 64k 1994 - 32lk Now - 115k Ex local 6th floor 3 bed, bad block in Hackney. 1995 -38k Now 130k 2 bed ground floor flat newbuild Cambdidge 1988 - 64k 1994- 40k Now - 120-140
  12. Thanks for replies. So if we have a situation where the market dips and people buy their fist place, that is good news for them. As educated and seemingly pretty sharp people you would no doubt consider buying two at near bottom of the market as this makes sound financial sense, as property is the ideal investment vehicle, it is tangible, has steady and sometimes remarkable capital growth and a good monthly dividend. We all work for our cash and it is nice to get a little help from investments so my point is, fine buy your flat/house at the bottom of the market, great fundamentals, but onl
  13. If house prices fell by 30-40% or even more, I imagine most of you ftb would buy. The question is would you buy if HPI was linked to inflation, say 2-4% a year and not dependant on market forces, therfore no upturn after the crash. Do you look at property as a place to live or that plus a nice little earner. Honest answers appreciated.
  14. As a profiteer of property over the past 10 years and slowly digesting all comments from this forum and other sources I have formed an opinion. Anyone thinking of buying in the next five years is insane. Stack up the evidence, look at sentiment and think logic. BTl is a complete waste of time now, and I have been involved since 94. The North is about to enter the abyss bigtime. TV property programs are soon to be gone, no doubt replaiced by a new fad. Think about our situation in the UK. It's over for property for the short term. Smart money will be hedging or selling. Now lets all calm
  15. I used to have a similar problem and found that extreme physical violence was an excellent solution, however I suggest you do move instead as once you have peace, you are a much happier bunny.
  16. I am afraid we come back to capitalism. Rich get richer, poor get poorer, in any crash or boom scenario. Ok you FTB,s get a better deal if you buy well, but in the up's n down's of 20th century capitalism you will find that the the poor find it harder on each cycle and the rich easier. Eventual upshot is the rich own everything, the poor rent. That is the future of cyclical markets.
  17. In 1998 I sat next to an astute Mancunian at a Winkworth action where lots of 2 up, 2 downs in Burnley, Oldham and such like were going for between 3-5k. My Mancunian chap was quite pleased because he had flipped them, buying them for about £1500.00. When the dust settles, you will find that the less deirable parts of the country will fall the furthest. The south-east will be ok, yes falls, but fundimentals are stronger. As for some parts of Wales, Ex-local east London flats, Un-regenerateable northern towns and other odd boom areas, the falls could be 90% as they are basically unsellable
  18. Ok, I appreciate this will be an unpopular post but I am afraid I am right. Our grandparents fought and rebuilt our country, our parents benefited from high inflation, public sell offs and decent pensions and we, the 18-40 years olds are picking up the tab. lets face it, the only way most of us will feel wealth, even moderate are with inheritance... nice thought eh? The simple fact is that society is now so divided with haves and have nots, you FTb's are rightly pissed at not being given a decent break and may well have to wait quite some time for your chance. It is a modern phenomenon and wi
  19. Anyone paying into any collective investment scheme is a loonie, especially in this low inflationary enviroment. If you think Equitable Life will be the last casualty, I beleive you are wrong. Save into HI accounts, take advantage of oppotunity when it comes and manage your own financial future.
  20. I think we are now seeing the market stabilize and are hoping for 20-40% drops over a few years, which is what it will take. This may happen, it may not. So many factors contribute; it's impossible for economists to get a real take on it. So you are faced with the unknown, a familiar investment scenario. So when do you jump in and buy the first flat or invest in that portfolio? When asking prices are 15% lower may be tempting, it may the bottom, we may fall 50% which is quite possible if you look at the fundamentals and how markets generally move. All that said, they may rise and we find ours
  21. Thanks for the interesting replies. The money is very real, however. There is a lot of wealth in the UK and it has to go somewhere. Sure the poorest will suffer in a falling market and the wealthier will benefit from picking up cheaper properties. Nothing new there. Wealth will be generated at some point. My point was simply that in 2004 in the UK everyone is a developer, dealer, entrpenur and know what things are worth. Oppotunity is hard to find and these situations never last. There must be a correction to stimulate growth. It's purely a question of when. That said, we could be about to e
  22. First time post. I won't bother with the various stats that many have posted over the time I have been looking at this board, needless to say that it is fairly obvious to all fair minded souls that property in the UK is too expensive. In accordance with this fact, it must, therefor suffer a correction. It is how this pans out which is of interest. Crash or stagnation, who knows. Another thing that is of interest, and I have observed this in US mutual fund markets over the past 3-4 years which have not performed especially well, but have seen reasonable subscription is "there is nowhere else
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