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shlomo

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Everything posted by shlomo

  1. Have you heard of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deepwater_Horizon_oil_spill
  2. No, if they call it a British bank they will be able to fine less than if the call it Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation
  3. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-54225572 HSBC allowed fraudsters to transfer millions of dollars around the world even after it had learned of their scam, leaked secret files show. Britain's biggest bank moved the money through its US business to HSBC accounts in Hong Kong in 2013 and 2014. Its role in the $80m (£62m) fraud is detailed in a leak of documents - banks' "suspicious activity reports" - that have been called the FinCEN Files. HSBC says it has always met its legal duties on reporting such activity. The files show the investment scam started soon after the bank was fined $1.9bn (£1.4bn) in the US over money laundering. It had promised to clamp down on these sorts of practices. The scam was a Ponzi scheme - a notorious type of investment racket that pays existing stakeholders with money collected from new members. Lawyers for duped investors say the bank should have acted sooner to close the fraudsters' accounts. The documents leak includes a series of other revelations - such as the suggestion one of the biggest banks in the US may have helped a notorious mobster to move more than $1bn.
  4. If he was black and a white policeman did that people would be upset, the rules need to be same for everyone.
  5. It does because a lot of the money is stored by purchasing properties in London
  6. They purchased a lot of flats especially the Chinese, so i am guessing they have lost a lot of money.
  7. I would guess that the shares in challenger banks would crash, that is my opinion and i have no training in finance and mostly talk shit. In answer to your question yes it should, if we have any EU people on here would love to know if you have been contacted by UK financial banks.
  8. Lloyds Bank confirmed to The Sunday Times that it will be withdrawing services from Holland, Slovakia, Germany, Ireland, Italy and Portugal - in a move that will affect 13,000 British customers. The bank, which is Britain's biggest banking group, started writing to its customers living in these countries since August, telling them that their UK bank accounts would be shut on December 31. Barclays also confirmed that its banking and credit-card customers living in the EU had started receiving letters. One Barclays customer, who lives in Brittany, confirmed to the Sunday Times that she had received a letter saying her Barclaycard will be terminated on November 16, despite being a customer for more than 40 years. Other Barclays customers living in Spain, France and Belgium have also confirmed that they received notice their Barclaycards will be cancelled
  9. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8752653/British-expats-Europe-stripped-UK-bank-accounts-weeks-post-Brexit-rules.html Tens of thousands of British expats who live in Europe risk having their UK bank accounts closed 'in weeks' due to post-Brexit rules. Lloyds, Barclays and Coutts are among a number of UK banks that have starting giving notice to expatriate customers to say they will close their accounts at 11pm on December 31
  10. I wonder how much we are going to lose from student loans.
  11. some people have not had a wage for 5 months, i know of one IT bod who paid himself dividends and he told me that cannot get anything from the furlough people. His was a IT Contractor and a few small business clients and he said brexit crashed him and then on top of that no furlough money. He is S hitting it, he does not talk to me anymore so cannot give you an update.
  12. A luxury rebound in China is fueling hopes of a rapid recovery for high-end brands. Yet analysts say the wealthy are likely spend very differently in the post-pandemic world. Many of the biggest brands in China — including Louis Vuitton, Hermes, Gucci and Prada — are seeing rapid bounce backs in sales as stores reopen in China, according to Claudia D’Arpizio, partner at Bain & Co who focuses on luxury. After a steep and sudden drop in the first quarter, many top brands will end up positive for 2020 in China given the strong sales, she said. The Hermes store in Guangzhou, for instance, hauled in $2.7 million in sales the day it reopened in April —believed to be a record for a boutique in China. The burst of sales has created a new retail term for the post-lockdown rebound: “revenge spending.” The idea is that consumers were shopping starved during their quarantine and are overcompensating by splurging more than usual. “We’re seeing people come back to the stores quite quickly,” D’Arpizio said. “It’s not yet at the same levels yet as it was before the crisis. But revenge spending is happening — and also to some degree in Europe. The people who are coming back into the stores are strongly motivated to buy.
  13. Does he own a house in London on mortgage, and can the work be done from any location?
  14. I am not saying that, I am talking about a mindset, I know bus drivers who own houses that would have sold for £1m + in 2016 In my opinion that is the biggest draw for the UK not benefits or liberal democracy
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