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Left2014

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About Left2014

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  1. My biggest problem with Brexit is that it is a horrendous and unforgivable distraction. It distracts us from the very real problems that we have. Brexit is a faux problem designed to make us think that our binary choice, Remain or Leave, matters for our future more than the other intelligent, well thought out policies that the government could be developing. Neither of the two faux choices we were given in the referendum will matter at all if we do not fix the structural problems in our society and economy. We need to start asking sensible questions: Why does it matter so much that Japanese companies invest in the UK? Where have all our indigenous manufacturers gone? How do we make our indigenous manufacturers more competitive? James Dyson commented that the engineers are better in Asia, one of his reasons for basing his operations in Singapore. Why do we not have good engineers in the UK when British history is filled with great ones? We have a housing crisis, where many are forced to rent when they would prefer to buy. How is this going to be resolved? Do Leavers or Remainers have the solutions, one that does not involve population decline? A choice for either Remain or Leave will not answer any of these questions, but we are forced to reframe everything we think about in the context of these artificial constructs. This forum is about this "Brexit" phenomenon, and what happens next? My hope is that I never hear the word Brexit ever again and the whole pointless exercise disappears from people's minds and gets replaced with something more important. At this point, I hope that either Brexit gets cancelled or we leave with No Deal on the 29 th of March. If we extend or delay then we are just prolonging the agony and will continue to be distracted from more pressing matters.
  2. Not to mention, Singapore is a mercantilist mini-state that gets away with things that a larger country might not ... like exchange rate manipulation, for example.
  3. My worry is that Brexit will remove some very good reasons to invest in the UK, and not replace them with other good reasons. Some politicians have advocated a Singapore model to enhance our competitiveness. I have lived in Singapore for over 5 years, and, to be frank, it may not appeal to a great many people in the UK. And, it will require people to undergo huge cultural changes.
  4. In a sense, it is difficult to ascribe individual closures to Brexit, over, say, the normal churn in the economy. But if you look at the figures, there has been a noticeable slowing of inward investment into the UK since the referendum. You could argue that this is due to the "uncertainty", and not by the decision itself. Will the conclusion of the negotiations reverse the trend, that is the question?
  5. No, not exactly. I'm saying there are strong incentives not to mention Brexit as a rationale for your decision making. Even if it is really the reason ... companies tend to do better by appealing to the masses and appearing to be apolitical.
  6. Just to be clear, most companies make decisions based on a number of different factors, and, while Brexit may be one of those reasons, they are likely not to say it. Companies are aware that 17+ million people voted for Brexit, a particularly large number of potential customers, and they do not want to alienate them unnecessarily. So, Brexit is causing companies to leave the UK, but it is a quiet exodus.
  7. The whole debt is money is the foundation of the Ponzi scheme ... rising house prices are just the side effect. I say "rising" but really, in the long run, they stay the same price - it's just the yardstick keeps changing size. It's a bit like trying to predict the speed of the car next to you on the motorway without looking at your own speedometer.
  8. It's certainly possible, but, for me, it always comes back to this plot ... https://tradingeconomics.com/united-kingdom/money-supply-m1 There's so much new money, and it has to go somewhere. I'm of the opinion that *most* of the rise in house prices doesn't reflect *real* price rises, just the effect of several decades of money creation ... some of the rise in prices may be part of a bubble, but a large chunk may not be ...
  9. Good post. People always point the finger at capitalism and say it has run a muck. But we've not had capitalism in its purest form for a long time, if ever.
  10. Also, coffee shops are an important part of the economy these days. So, if everyone stopped buying their coffee then some people would lose their jobs, and they'd be even less likely to be able to buy a home. Saying that we should stop focusing on any part of the economy so that we can all focus on keeping house prices high is misaligned thinking. We should all stop focusing on keeping house prices high and make sure the money goes to more productive parts of the economy.
  11. Check her pockets ... they're probably stuffed with cash ...
  12. Hello, I'm a long time observer of HousePriceCrash, but I joined only recently. I'm searching the news sites, but I see no mention of any prosecution proceedings against the directors of Carillion. How can this be? This has to be a clear case of deliberate mismanagement, not unlike the BHS scandal. If the whole board of directors don't go to jail (and have their assets stripped to help pay down any of Carillion's debts) then my disdain for British politics will be complete.
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